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Calculating saddle height

scotthunterscotthunter Posts: 140
edited May 2019 in Road beginners
Random question about saddle height.

I'm using the 109% of inseam for top of saddle to lower pedal, or 88.3% of in-seam for top of saddle to centre of bottom bracket, to work out correct saddle height.

In calculating your in-seam or inside leg, using the hardback book between legs method and marking a line on the wall when the long edge of the book is flat against the wall, are you supposed to do this with clothes on or not? As the difference can be 1 or 2 centimeters.

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Unless you usually ride naked, measure with clothes on...
  • dannbodgedannbodge Posts: 927
    When I did mine, I measured it whilst wearing my bib shorts.

    That 1-2cm can make a huge difference in comfort.
  • scotthunterscotthunter Posts: 140
    Imposter wrote:
    Unless you usually ride naked, measure with clothes on...

    So not from your perineum to the floor then?
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Imposter wrote:
    Unless you usually ride naked, measure with clothes on...

    So not from your perineum to the floor then?

    I think you're taking the guidance too literally. If you ride with clothes on - measure with clothes on. The net result will be the same in any case.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    Well I've just back-calculated from the saddle height determined by a bike fit and your 88.3%, and either my saddle's too high or my legs are longer than I thought.

    It feels perfect on the bike, so I think I need to do some faffing with a book, my perineum and a tape measure. It will bug me no end till I've checked.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    sit on bike wearing riding attire

    raise or lower saddle until it feels right.

    ride bike.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • scotthunterscotthunter Posts: 140

    Well the above mentioned method is the one favoured by Tour De France winner Greg Lemond and is widely used.

    I notice a big difference in peddling efficiency and power delivery by just a 1cm change in saddle height. I was actually riding with my saddle a good couple of cm lower than it should have been before using this method. I raised it to 74cm from BB (I’m 180cm) and instantly noticed an improvement.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    fill ya boots then. you seem to have it cracked.

    #sortedforsaddlesandwhizz
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Well the above mentioned method is the one favoured by Tour De France winner Greg Lemond and is widely used.

    Lots of methods/formulas to set saddle height - of which the Lemond method is only one..
    I notice a big difference in peddling efficiency and power delivery by just a 1cm change in saddle height. I was actually riding with my saddle a good couple of cm lower than it should have been before using this method. I raised it to 74cm from BB (I’m 180cm) and instantly noticed an improvement.

    Most people would notice a 1cm difference - which is significant by any measure.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    edited May 2019
    Imposter wrote:
    Well the above mentioned method is the one favoured by Tour De France winner Greg Lemond and is widely used.

    Lots of methods/formulas to set saddle height - of which the Lemond method is only one..
    I notice a big difference in peddling efficiency and power delivery by just a 1cm change in saddle height. I was actually riding with my saddle a good couple of cm lower than it should have been before using this method. I raised it to 74cm from BB (I’m 180cm) and instantly noticed an improvement.

    Most people would notice a 1cm difference - which is significant by any measure.


    and 2cm plus as above is massive. no wonder he felt a difference. don't need tour de france winner greg lemond to tell us that.

    #massive
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    are you accounting for reach, crank length & pedal stack?
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • KajjalKajjal Posts: 3,404
    The simplest way to get saddle height about right is sit on saddle and put pedal down in line with seat post keeping your foot flat. Then try to lift yourself off the saddle vertically in line with the seat post without pointing your feet. If you can’t do this you saddle is too high, if you can do it potentially you can raise your saddle. Best to be a little too low than too high as being too high means you are straining and over stretching to reach the pedals which causes various strains and injuries.

    Due to people’s varying build, flexibility etc. most systems are just a guide.
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 22,788 Lives Here
    Kajjal wrote:
    Due to people’s varying build, flexibility etc. most systems are just a guide.
    This, and more of this.
    I set the height pretty much as mentioned earlier in this post, but will then adjust over the next few rides if necessary until it feels right. I’ve never used a tape measure or used a book to give myself a wedgie.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    veronese68 wrote:
    Kajjal wrote:
    Due to people’s varying build, flexibility etc. most systems are just a guide.
    This, and more of this.
    I set the height pretty much as mentioned earlier in this post, but will then adjust over the next few rides if necessary until it feels right. I’ve never used a tape measure or used a book to give myself a wedgie.

    but its what my bestie at the shop/club said i had to do. and tour de france winner greg lemond (not to be confused with that other greg lemond who runs the eels stall in the fish market)

    #fishy
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • dannbodgedannbodge Posts: 927
    Having had a bike fit and then measuring my saddle height using the 109% to pedal top.
    My saddle was set to 90cm at the bike fit and the 109% is 90.45cm.

    I think that's pretty good tbh.
  • hdowhdow Posts: 146
    I've tried both %s and neither was right. The heel on the pedal was far better but ultimately the 'raise the saddle to the point just before your hips start to rock' method works for me. Any higher or lower and I start getting knee pain on longer, harder rides and I also lose a lot of power output. This I noticed doing reps when the saddle post slipped down a cm or so.

    Alternatively if your knees get sore at the front then raise the saddle, sore at the back lower it
  • scotthunterscotthunter Posts: 140
    hdow wrote:
    I've tried both %s and neither was right. The heel on the pedal was far better but ultimately the 'raise the saddle to the point just before your hips start to rock' method works for me. Any higher or lower and I start getting knee pain on longer, harder rides and I also lose a lot of power output. This I noticed doing reps when the saddle post slipped down a cm or so.

    Alternatively if your knees get sore at the front then raise the saddle, sore at the back lower it

    Trouble with the heel on the pedal method is that it depends on what shoes you’re wearing. For instance I wear MTB shoes with recessed SPD cleats and the rubber feet are almost 1cm thick.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    hdow wrote:
    I've tried both %s and neither was right. The heel on the pedal was far better but ultimately the 'raise the saddle to the point just before your hips start to rock' method works for me. Any higher or lower and I start getting knee pain on longer, harder rides and I also lose a lot of power output. This I noticed doing reps when the saddle post slipped down a cm or so.

    Alternatively if your knees get sore at the front then raise the saddle, sore at the back lower it

    Trouble with the heel on the pedal method is that it depends on what shoes you’re wearing. For instance I wear MTB shoes with recessed SPD cleats and the rubber feet are almost 1cm thick.

    The 'heel' method is not going to give you an exact measurement, regardless of what (if any) shoes you might be wearing. It is only intended to get you 'in the ballpark' from where you make your own final adjustments to suit. Pretty much like any other method. Relying on any of these methods to give you an exact scientific measurement is never going to work.
  • sungodsungod Posts: 12,678
    ^this

    forget lemond and all the similar methods, they have no scientific basis, humans vary, there can be no simple % that is 'correct'

    use a dynamic method, steve hogg's is pretty straightforward...
    https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bi ... can-it-be/
    https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bi ... oad-bikes/

    once you get the saddle height and position where you need it, you can move on to the bar height/reach
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Sutton_RiderSutton_Rider Posts: 436
    I've tried them all and found the best method, for me, was the heal on the pedal.
    http://www.qsl.net/g4gvb
    Ridley Fenix SL Ultegra Di2 - 2020
    Carrera Virtuoso - 2015
    ex Focus Cayo Ultegra Di2 - 2016
    ex Giant Defy 1 - 2015
  • webboowebboo Posts: 2,684
    I've tried them all and found the best method, for me, was the heal on the pedal.
    Did it cure the problem.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    webboo wrote:
    I've tried them all and found the best method, for me, was the heal on the pedal.
    Did it cure the problem.

    #wirebrushandparaffin
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
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