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Tyre wont come off

GreggerGregger Posts: 71
edited April 2019 in MTB workshop & tech
WTB Nano (tubeless ready) tyre on my Giant Advanced rim

Trying to swap tyres
As per normal one side of the tyre came off OK
Tube out but the other side of the tyre seems almost welded/stuck in - could budge it atall
Never had this problem before
Is this because its tubeless ready?

Any thoughts/ advice

Posts

  • yonnyyonny Posts: 36
    Yes.
    The bead seats on the rim, it can be a nightmare to get them on/off mate.
  • JBAJBA Posts: 2,621
    The bead has locked in to the rim. Lots of brute force will get it free.
    “Life has been unfaithful
    And it all promised so so much”

    Giant Trance 2 27.5 2016 ¦ Bird Zero Mk1 ¦ Giant Revolt Advanced 2 2019 ¦ Giant Anthem 3 2015 ¦ Specialized Myka Comp FSR 2009
  • GreggerGregger Posts: 71
    Mole grip or C clamp job by the look of it then
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 1,980
    Lay the wheel down so that the rim is supported and the stuck bead is uppermost.
    Find something smooth and firm, like a hammer shaft; I use my mini-pump.

    Using the mini-pump/hammer shaft (whatever), press down on the tyre as close to the rim as you can get, press firmly and the bead will come off the rim. For it to work, there has to be something solid like a work bench or counter top underneath the rim (I once used a log). And you have to be able to get your weight onto the tool you are using.

    It has never failed me, so far. :)
  • GreggerGregger Posts: 71
    Lay the wheel down so that the rim is supported and the stuck bead is uppermost.
    Find something smooth and firm, like a hammer shaft; I use my mini-pump.

    Using the mini-pump/hammer shaft (whatever), press down on the tyre as close to the rim as you can get, press firmly and the bead will come off the rim. For it to work, there has to be something solid like a work bench or counter top underneath the rim (I once used a log). And you have to be able to get your weight onto the tool you are using.

    It has never failed me, so far. :)


    I hope your insured to give this advice!
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 1,980
    Gregger wrote:
    Lay the wheel down so that the rim is supported and the stuck bead is uppermost.
    Find something smooth and firm, like a hammer shaft; I use my mini-pump.

    Using the mini-pump/hammer shaft (whatever), press down on the tyre as close to the rim as you can get, press firmly and the bead will come off the rim. For it to work, there has to be something solid like a work bench or counter top underneath the rim (I once used a log). And you have to be able to get your weight onto the tool you are using.

    It has never failed me, so far. :)


    I hope your insured to give this advice!

    You are of course completely free to ignore my post and follow JBA's sound advice instead.
  • GreggerGregger Posts: 71
    Steve, the hammer thingy didnt work for me
    Put the blasted precious wheel in a vice and it eventually came off
    Carrying a bench and vice on the trail seems to defeat the point of a carbon tailed hard tail
    Now has Continental Race Sports on it and now I'll have to check if I can change a tube on these with levers alone
    Madness
  • larkimlarkim Posts: 2,284
    Go tubeless and you won't need to change tubes ...
    2015 Canyon Nerve AL 6.0 (son #1's)
    2011 Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc (son #3s)
    2013 Decathlon Triban 3 (red) (mine)
    2019 Hoy Bonaly 26" Disc (son #2s)
    2018 Voodoo Bizango (mine)
    2018 Voodoo Maji (wife's)
  • mark~pmark~p Posts: 52
    "Go tubeless and you won't need to change tubes ..."

    I would not be so confident in that statement. The number of times the MBUK testers or Wrecking Crew have commented that a tubeless setup has got a leak that cannot be fixed so they have put a tube in to get going again is quite high.

    Tubeless does have advantages but it is easy to overlook the fact that the can (and do fail) as well as wear out. At some point you will have to get the tyre off.
  • JBAJBA Posts: 2,621
    Tubeless is not infallible but it certainly hugely decreases the need to remove the tyre.
    There will always be punctures or tyre slashes that the fluid cannot seal so it is wise to carry a tube.
    “Life has been unfaithful
    And it all promised so so much”

    Giant Trance 2 27.5 2016 ¦ Bird Zero Mk1 ¦ Giant Revolt Advanced 2 2019 ¦ Giant Anthem 3 2015 ¦ Specialized Myka Comp FSR 2009
  • larkimlarkim Posts: 2,284
    mark~p wrote:
    "Go tubeless and you won't need to change tubes ..."

    I would not be so confident in that statement.

    Well, by definition if you are tubeless, there is no tube to be changed!! ;-) You're right, a trail-side big leak or cut can still wipe out a ride, and I always take a tube with me just in case. But on the sample of one teenage rider who got at least a puncture a week when riding local trails mainly down to hawthorns etc, he went over 12 months without a puncture after going tubeless.

    Just this weekend, he got a small cut in a tyre. Stopped for 30s until the fluid stopped leaking out, carried on a rode another hour.

    I can heartily recommend it, and in my case that's not even on tubeless-specific tyres or rims.
    2015 Canyon Nerve AL 6.0 (son #1's)
    2011 Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc (son #3s)
    2013 Decathlon Triban 3 (red) (mine)
    2019 Hoy Bonaly 26" Disc (son #2s)
    2018 Voodoo Bizango (mine)
    2018 Voodoo Maji (wife's)
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 1,980
    I can echo larkim (sort of).

    When I had tubes, I used to get a puncture resulting in a flat every 14 miles on average. Then I put Slime sealant in my tubes and never got another flat. :)

    Several years later, I went tubeless AND with sealant. Apart from two tyres that were faulty and tore at the bead in exactly the same place (manufacturing fault), I have had zero flats. I've had loads of punctures though; my best so far is over two dozen in one tyre. :shock:

    The reason for my success is that I carry some magic talismans! Oh yes! :lol:
    They are called a spare inner tube, tyre levers, mini-pump, tube patches, and tyre patches. Apart from the two duff tyres mentioned above), the only time they ever get used is on other people's bikes.
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