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First time out, advice?

gt8374uh9jiodpogt8374uh9jiodpo Posts: 51
edited April 2019 in Road beginners
Hello

After several years commuting and venturing out on to the country roads on a rather heavy old hybrid, after much research and waiting I have finally purchased a road bike (second hand). It needed new tyres so after spending 90 minutes (yes really) shouting, checking youtube, swearing at and eventually putting on some new rubber I am ready to take it out.

For the time being I will be running flat pedals until I am used to all the other differences. So does anybody have any advice for my first time riding a road bike?

Posts

  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,212
    1 thing.

    Just enjoy it. nothing more nothing less. Don't overthink it.
  • amrushtonamrushton Posts: 761
    Make sure you have 2 x spare tubes and a good pump ie it moves a lot air quickly so you are not faffing at the road side. Have you got tyre levers and can you use them - if not practise at home. Halfway from home is not the place to learn! Disposable gloves so you can keep your hands/road gloves clean.
    Remember to shoulder check before moving out to the centre of the road or turning right. Indicate clearly and in good time and anticipate what the driver may/may not do. Own the road ie ride away from the kerb (1m) and passing parked cars ride to avoid doors suddenly opening. Look around and enjoy yourself and dont spend time looking down at your gears. If there is an issue, staring at them wont fix them. Similarly dont spend time looking at your computer. Ideally pick a quiet route.
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,212
    Ffs.
  • 1 thing.

    Just enjoy it. nothing more nothing less. Don't overthink it.
    That's two things. :P

    Both very valid though and solid advice. Have fun and enjoy the journey.
  • yiannismyiannism Posts: 344
    Just have a spear tube, and a co2 bump. Learn how to change it if needed, be extra careful from those potential killers that are on the steel cages and they hate us. Thats all you need for now.
  • Oh yes my tyre levers had a lot of use yesterday, glad I got the reinforced ones. Will probably take a little bottle of washing up liquid on rides as lubricating the rim seemed to help getting the tyres on. Dont fancy a repeat performance by the roadside.

    I dont have a computer. Prefer to browse Google maps and print off a few pages for my route and use road signs. Country cycling had the wonderful advantage of being able to stop pretty much as and when you need.
  • homers_doublehomers_double Posts: 6,568
    At this rate you're going to need panniers.

    Forget the washing up liquid, a little practice and you'll have tyres off in no time.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • Taking off was easy. Getting the new ones on was horrid, especially the last few inches on to the rim. Subsequently read lots of reviews and many people say the same.
  • meursaultmeursault Posts: 1,476
    Taking off was easy. Getting the new ones on was horrid, especially the last few inches on to the rim. Subsequently read lots of reviews and many people say the same.

    If you have 25mm or even 28mm you will find those easier to get on and off.
    Superstition sets the whole world in flames; philosophy quenches them.

    Voltaire
  • Carry a Kool Tool or VAR levers to make getting the tyre on easier. They weigh next to nothing and are well worth it.
  • Ride with a know all, (plenty about) get him to change the tyre.
  • step83step83 Posts: 3,866
    Taking off was easy. Getting the new ones on was horrid, especially the last few inches on to the rim. Subsequently read lots of reviews and many people say the same.

    Thats actually pretty normal, When I put new ones on a set of rims they were a total pig, now though they have stretched slightly (quite normal) an I can fold them off the rim with the tyre deflated no lever needed.

    In all honestly you'll really only need what the rest of us to, spare tube, lever an maybe a patch kit and pump or CO2 can, a multi tool, bottle of drink bit of food phone, card and a bit of cash.
  • joe_totale-2joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,055
    I wouldn't bother with the fairy liquid and instead go out with a support vehicle carrying several spare wheels and bikes.
  • Best bet is to not actually ride your bike, just post endless stuff on forums such as this. There's one or two of those types on here...
  • amrushtonamrushton Posts: 761
    Even better - do a Zwift ride on eg a Wattbike and watch some vlogs on riding, audax, repairing bikes. You don't leave the house and nothing to fix.
  • lakesludditelakesluddite Posts: 1,319
    You've been riding a bike for years - so there's probably nothing that you need to learn. It's just the same thing but with slightly different handlebars (and looks much cooler!).
  • homers_doublehomers_double Posts: 6,568
    I have a butler in tow who changes mine, he does get annoyed though because it ruins his gloves.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,451
    After years on a hybrid the biggest shock on my first ride with drop bars was how much I wobbled when I got out of the saddle going uphill. Because your bending forward more your weight shifts even further forward when you lift your bum. And I went downhill much faster, which made breaking on bends a bit hair raising. I'm guessing all the usual stuff you already know as a commuter.

    I learned to love cycling even more on a road bike than I already did on my hybrid. I hope you get the same experience.
  • Joe Totale wrote:
    I wouldn't bother with the fairy liquid and instead go out with a support vehicle carrying several spare wheels and bikes.

    Not a bad shout. My brother isnt far away and has an old Volvo S80. I will see if I can get a cheaper backup road bike and then speak to him about providing support. Only thing is he will need breakdown cover, would you suggest AA or RAC? or even Greenflag?
  • mrfpb wrote:
    After years on a hybrid the biggest shock on my first ride with drop bars was how much I wobbled when I got out of the saddle going uphill. Because your bending forward more your weight shifts even further forward when you lift your bum. And I went downhill much faster, which made breaking on bends a bit hair raising. I'm guessing all the usual stuff you already know as a commuter.

    I learned to love cycling even more on a road bike than I already did on my hybrid. I hope you get the same experience.

    Just had a quick test drive nearby where I live. The acceleration is something else compared to the hybrid. Surprisingly the brakes are way better too which surprised me as they are just rims rather than discs.

    Gradually getting used to the different type of gears and hand position. Looking forward to the next outing.
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