Any Drummers out there??

bartman100
bartman100 Posts: 544
edited February 2019 in The cake stop
I'm 44 and I've always wanted to play the drums. Thankfully I've moved to an old property with massively thick walls and semi-detached with my bedroom not adjoining a neighbour. I also have an outside office. So, I'm happy that I won't be disturbing anyone (famous last words).

Just looking for any tips on getting started. I kinda need "my first drum kit" but would rather buy quality, perhaps second hand. I just need something to learn the basics. Base drum(obvs), snare? hi hat? What else?? My tastes are wide and varied but I'd like to beat the shit out of them at times too.

Where to start? There are plenty of online courses I see.

Tips or advice appreciated.

Comments

  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,709
    My tip is look after your hearing - make sure you get some appropriate ear plugs.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • My tip is look after your hearing - make sure you get some appropriate ear plugs.
    Ha! good tip, but I fear it maybe too late :)
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    bartman100 wrote:
    My tip is look after your hearing - make sure you get some appropriate ear plugs.
    Ha! good tip, but I fear it maybe too late :)

    Get some for your neighbours?
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    Yes I'm a drummer, 51 years young and got back into it a couple of years ago. I'm playing in a 17 piece big band at the moment and really enjoying it. Post questions on here or drop me a PM, we can exchange phone numbers and do that rare thing called "discussion" for real. I have some ideas for a first drum kit, and there are lots of "quiet" options available too.
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  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    What kit to start with depends a lot on budget. I'd say the "go to" kit would be a Pearl Export or similar. Have a look on Ebay to see whats on offer around your area, also there are some online and local shops that do second hand stuff. Place near me was selling a complete kit for £50.

    For drums (known as a shell pack) you'll want:
    - Bass drum, typically 22" but 20" is also common, I have a 20" and an 18" for my smaller jazz kit
    - Snare drum , that'll be 14" and 5"-6" depth
    - Toms, typically two side or rack toms (10"/12") and floor tom (16")
    - Cymbals, they can be expensive, but you'll want a hi hat (14"), a ride cymbal (20" or so) and a crash (16").
    - Hardware for cymbals and toms as needed, plus a stool/throne and bass drum pedal.
    - Sticks.
    - Heads are another thing, wee what comes with your drums, you can always upgrade.

    For a quieter life there are a few options for heads, cymbals and pads etc.

    I'd suggest having some lessons with a real teacher to start with, there are a lot of online resources too that will help but a real teacher will be invaluable to start you off properly. Hand technique (holding the sticks) is really important.
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  • cooldad
    cooldad Posts: 32,599
    I didn't know drummers could read.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    cooldad wrote:
    I didn't know drummers could read.

    Most can't. I have a classical music upbringing so am fluid in both the English and Music languages :lol:
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  • drlodge wrote:
    Yes I'm a drummer, 51 years young and got back into it a couple of years ago. I'm playing in a 17 piece big band at the moment and really enjoying it. Post questions on here or drop me a PM, we can exchange phone numbers and do that rare thing called "discussion" for real. I have some ideas for a first drum kit, and there are lots of "quiet" options available too.
    Thanks drlodge that's a very kind offer. I'm imagining it as a post-work destress activity but that doesn't mean going full John Bonham or Animal from the muppets.
  • drlodge wrote:
    What kit to start with depends a lot on budget. I'd say the "go to" kit would be a Pearl Export or similar. Have a look on Ebay to see whats on offer around your area, also there are some online and local shops that do second hand stuff. Place near me was selling a complete kit for £50.

    For drums (known as a shell pack) you'll want:
    - Bass drum, typically 22" but 20" is also common, I have a 20" and an 18" for my smaller jazz kit
    - Snare drum , that'll be 14" and 5"-6" depth
    - Toms, typically two side or rack toms (10"/12") and floor tom (16")
    - Cymbals, they can be expensive, but you'll want a hi hat (14"), a ride cymbal (20" or so) and a crash (16").
    - Hardware for cymbals and toms as needed, plus a stool/throne and bass drum pedal.
    - Sticks.
    - Heads are another thing, wee what comes with your drums, you can always upgrade.

    For a quieter life there are a few options for heads, cymbals and pads etc.

    I'd suggest having some lessons with a real teacher to start with, there are a lot of online resources too that will help but a real teacher will be invaluable to start you off properly. Hand technique (holding the sticks) is really important.

    Perfect, really appreciate all the info - I have something to go on now and will have a browse on the net
  • ricky_h-2
    ricky_h-2 Posts: 119
    If noise is a concern, how about an electronic drum kit ? Roland do a pretty good basic set up and you can plug in your music and drum along with your headphones on. I know it is heresy to some but I (and the neighbours) have no complaints about my kit
  • Ricky h wrote:
    If noise is a concern, how about an electronic drum kit ? Roland do a pretty good basic set up and you can plug in your music and drum along with your headphones on. I know it is heresy to some but I (and the neighbours) have no complaints about my kit
    This had crossed my mind. But looking cool is very important (obviously) so not sure it's viable for me. I'd really rather have the real thing. I mean, in a years time I might need it when I'm in demand as a session drummer.
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    Electronic drums are a real compromise unless you spend a lot of money, the pads are small and don't feel anything like a real drum head. Its simply no fun to play on.

    I've using Remo silent stroke heads on my big kit for practicing (a Pearl Prestige Session Select from the late 90s) together with Zildjian low volume L80 cymbals, I can play normally and still hold a conversation. SS heads are fairly cheap, the L80 cymbals are not.

    On my other kit, a Natal Arcadia birch Jazz kit with 18" BD, I'm using Code coated DNA heads which are much cheaper than Remo or Evans.

    45058576655_ea95e82e41_c.jpg
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  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 39,915
    Got a lad next door to me, 16 or 17, who is a brilliant drummer (and all round percussionist). He is set up in the garage which is separated from our (converted) garage by a few inches and I can still clearly hear him in the main part of the house so 5-10m from where he plays. I think he uses pads as well but I'm not certain. Luckily he is an excellent player and I really enjoy listening to him practice as when I work from home I get him playing for an hour or two as soon as he comes home from school. So I would say don't under-estimate the potential impact on neighbours, especially if you've just moved in, and invest in some pads as you are unlikely to be pleasing on the ear when first learning.
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    10 minutes drumming with music turned up high so I can gear it over my noise and my ears are ringing. Obviously on a normal drum kit with normal heads.
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  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674
    Go for it Bart. Just don't expect it to be as easy as it looks.

    (speaking as a bass player, and, as everybody knows, a bass player is a cross between a drummer and a musician)
  • crispybug2
    crispybug2 Posts: 2,915
    Another bassist here, my son played drums for a few years, although they sit unplayed in the garage now.

    For sound damping, tape or towels on the skins and foam on the edges of the cymbals cut down the sound quite significantly, using rattan stick drumsticks also helps

    The two other things I’d say is if you can hang up thick sheets (like hessian) in the room that will reduce the sound travelling a great deal, also remember that you don’t have to hit the kit as if it’s about to jump up and attack you, concentrate on getting your technique correct first

    Hope that helps
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    This guy might be as good as me one day...enjoy

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6suv3mraIhw
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  • Can't beat the closing scene of whiplash for some inspiration.
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSdysbGcVV4

    I think this is a healthier way of relieving work stress than booze!
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    drlodge wrote:
    This guy might be as good as me one day...enjoy

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6suv3mraIhw

    The problem with that kind of stuff is whilst it is technically impressive, it is not in the slightest bit interesting as music. He is, in short, after all, drumming along to complete crap.

    That said, if you like that kind of thing here's another treat :)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czOjnlvHrQU
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,436
    drlodge wrote:
    cooldad wrote:
    I didn't know drummers could read.

    Most can't. I have a classical music upbringing so am fluid in both the English and Music languages :lol:
    Haha. Buddy Rich couldn't read, but he could remember every note of every tune he ever played with his big band. One of his famous ones (wait for the drum solo at about 8.00 - he shows how little kit you need) https://youtu.be/qA3QXCSckT0

    Depends what you want to do as to whether you learn to read or not. If you want to play in a big band, you'll not be popular if you can't (I know, I've been involved in several, and lead one or two), but if you want to do rock or small band jazz, reading isn't essential. But most important is to get good grooves sorted out... the hardest part is to co-ordinate all four limbs doing the different parts of the groove, and to make the groove feel, well, groovy.

    If you do want to read too, don't leave that to 'somewhere down the line' - do a little bit, every time, on the groove you're learning: match what your body/ears are experiencing with what that looks like notated. If you can afford a teacher, that might be a very worthwhile investment, if you find the right one.
  • amrushton
    amrushton Posts: 1,249
    if you haven't got your own band then reading may be essential for a session career. Think Gadd/weckl/Porcaro/Carlock/Colaitu etc they all had to be able to interpret the music as well as add their own magic. gregg Bissonette who played for d.L.Roth tells of his audition with Steve Vai and Billy Sheehan who tell him what they are going to play and Gregg starts writing it all down. Apparently they were impressed at his ability to transcribe and realised they could push the band as they now had someone who was able to understand what would be req. Vai of course was schooled with Zappa.