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The "water up your sleeves" thread

ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,379
edited December 2018 in Commuting chat
an hour of rain, heavily "Nikwaxed" Alpha jacket, when I take it off my base layer is pretty much dry, except the sleeves... it's quite clear water has been sucked from the wrists... I can see another hour would see water going all the way up and I would begin to get cold (my arms were beginning to feel a bit cold).
I won't even go into the "waterproof gloves" claims.

Any idea how to improve on this? Maybe short sleeved base layer is a better solution in winter after all?

Posts

  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,478
    Gloves with cuffs that cover the cuffs of the jacket?
    Beyond that - if you're really out in heaving rain, you're going to want drysuit cuffs.

    Personally though, I do a "managed wetting" - so plan to get wet and just keep the wind off to stop the chill - hands and lower arms are more tricky though - I have got some waterproof gloves on my christmas list, but up to now, I've just taken a spare set of gloves - so can put on a dry set part way into the ride.
  • slowbike wrote:
    Gloves with cuffs that cover the cuffs of the jacket?
    Beyond that - if you're really out in heaving rain, you're going to want drysuit cuffs.

    Personally though, I do a "managed wetting" - so plan to get wet and just keep the wind off to stop the chill - hands and lower arms are more tricky though - I have got some waterproof gloves on my christmas list, but up to now, I've just taken a spare set of gloves - so can put on a dry set part way into the ride.

    If you put the cuffs over the jacket, then you get more water in the gloves... It seems it's one I can't win. Hands get cold as they get wet and it's 6-7 degrees... if it's above 10 generally it's not an issue.

    Ultimately, I am not planning on long rides when wet AND cold, so I might just live with the problem for the short commutes. An improvement would be nice though
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,411
    Maybe a sleeveless/short sleeve base layer would solve the problem - water won't be soaked up the sleeves if they're not there.

    Possibly wear an additional thin base layer in compensation to keep you core warm.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,478
    I'm using ski gloves when it gets really cold - they've got massive cuffs and don't seem to get wet and cold inside - even when skiiing in the rain the temperature of my hands is tolerable. 6-7 degrees is on the verge of being too warm for ski gloves though.
  • You can buy replacement dry suit cuffs. Fancy a DIY job?

    Seriously though, water wicks up your sleeves. Nothing really stops that I reckon. I suggest managing the cold is your real issue. I personally don't mind getting wet but cold I don't like. If you sort your clothing too keep warm even when inevitably you wet out then at least the ride will be comfortable.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    What's your base layer made of? How about switching to something that's either less effective at transporting water by capillary action (something more lycra-esque?) or something that has better thermal properties when it's wet (maybe merino?)

    One thing to try under your jacket which would probably be zero cost (assuming you have the bits already) would be a short-sleeved base layer and lycra arm warmers...

    @jds - yes that would do the job, but seriously, who wants to look like a canoeist?!?
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,110
    rain-cover.jpg
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,478
    tgotb wrote:
    @jds - yes that would do the job, but seriously, who wants to look like a canoeist?!?
    I've worn a dinghy top that's similarly waterproof - in the torrential rain - you're getting wet whatever - just not from the rain ...
  • One word, Velomobile! Streamline and dry.

    If your kit isn't giving you the results you want, try to replace with better. I'm no expert but there's better waterproofs at resisting the wicking up the sleeves. I read this advice on this on another cycling forum I think. There was a guy on there I know of from a hiking forum who knows a lot about outdoor kit who gave good advice. Can't remember how long back but a year or two. IIRC it's something to do with the way the sleeve is made.

    Realistically it's not a solution but sorting out the layers underneath to ensure any water creeping up your sleeve is kept warm so you keep warm too. That's about your body heat = best thermal layers for the conditions. Making sure any wicking under layer doesn't come close to the inside of the cuff area. Long gloves tucked into it sleeve with underlayers tucked into the glove perhaps?

    I say wet and warm is second only to dry and warm. It's the cold that's your real problem here IMHO. Good luck in your search for a solution.
  • One word, Velomobile! Streamline and dry.
    .

    Still in love with this
    dsc_5934.jpg

    about 7 grand... :shock:
  • tgotb wrote:
    or something that has better thermal properties when it's wet (maybe merino?)

    I use merino
  • jlloydjlloyd Posts: 105
    Can't you just roll up your baselayer's sleeves a bit to create a gap?
  • jlloyd wrote:
    Can't you just roll up your baselayer's sleeves a bit to create a gap?

    I can try...
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,962
    A proper waterproof jacket?

    Whenever it's wet I'll always wear a thin waterproof jacket, and in weather like the past few days it'll go over a long sleve jersey (or 2) and a base layer.

    I have never tried these fancy jerseys/ jackets that are supposed to be breathable and waterproof etc so maybe I'm missing a trick. But I've never had the problem you've described, even in rides over 3 hours.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    When I put my Alpha on over a LS base layer I let go of the cuff of the base layer before my hand emerges from the jacket sleeve. That way there's nothing at the wrist to suck up rainwater. Still seems warm enough.

    And then I take it off again because when I go to zip up the inner I find I haven't put one arm through the armhole of the inner vest thing, but that's another issue...
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,602
    jlloyd wrote:
    Can't you just roll up your baselayer's sleeves a bit to create a gap?

    I can try...

    Steady now you're getting dangerously close to going for the sleeveless tri look :shock:

    :lol:
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,679
    Short sleeves under the waterproof and it won't get far enough up to wick anyway?

    You know I like my short sleeves.........
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,357 Lives Here
    Wear tighter clothes.
  • Treat the end of you baselayer sleeves with a ring of Vaseline - water won’t wick where water can’t go :wink:

    And, if anyone asks, you can pretend that you’re a vet
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
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