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Storaging brand new tyres. Do they lose their qualities?

galegogalego Posts: 13
edited November 2018 in Road general
Looking to buy some tyres and thought about buying few more spare ones.

Two questions.

1- Any tips where to store them? Any room in the house would do and in its original package?

2- if it was to fit them a year latet. Would they feel any different from day one? Basically would they lose any of its characteristics / qualities?

Cheers.

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,839
    1. anywhere
    2. no
  • What do you think happens to them in the damp warehouse where they've been sat for the last year before you bought them?
  • Out of direct sunlight, should be absolutely fine for years.
    ================
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • webboowebboo Posts: 2,127
    Back in the day everyone used to store their tubs in the airing cupboard for a year or so befor using them. Supposedly touched them up.
  • Keep them out of sunlight, and dry, and keep the temperature range fairly consistent and they shouldn’t degrade noticeably, under storage, for years.
  • There is probably a small amount of plasticiser additive used to avoid the rubber sticking to the injection molding equipment. Storage gets rid of it, as they are often volatile (smell of new plastic/rubber). Mechanical properties don't change in a meaningful way, so it was a waste of time back in the days... shouldn't make the rubber worse either, for as long as there is no direct sunlight exposire
  • chippykchippyk Posts: 529
    There is probably a small amount of plasticiser additive used to avoid the rubber sticking to the injection molding equipment. Storage gets rid of it, as they are often volatile (smell of new plastic/rubber). Mechanical properties don't change in a meaningful way, so it was a waste of time back in the days... shouldn't make the rubber worse either, for as long as there is no direct sunlight exposire

    You’d use a release agent in the mould, which may well be a low molecular weight organic, the plasticiser is a different additive and will probably be a resin or oil.
  • john1967john1967 Posts: 366
    webboo wrote:
    Back in the day everyone used to store their tubs in the airing cupboard for a year or so befor using them. Supposedly touched them up.


    was that before or after applying 50 layers of glue ? :lol:
  • sungodsungod Posts: 12,207
    most tyres these days are vulcanized, it makes the rubber more durable but it also stiffens it, as long they aren't stored in adverse conditions there'll be no significant change to them even after many years

    non-vulcanized rubber can be more supple, these days it is typically used in some brands of high-quality tubs and clinchers, these do 'age', the rubber becoming a bit tougher over time at the cost of a smidge of ultimate grip (but still very grippy)

    i've got a stack of tubs of various ages, current oldest probably 6-7 years, not planned, just happens that way, they are kept on their sides in the dark, i tend to use the old/repaired ones for winter as they will be a bit tougher and harder to cut, and keep the new supplest/stickiest for the better seasons
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • sungod wrote:
    most tyres these days are vulcanized, it makes the rubber more durable but it also stiffens it, as long they aren't stored in adverse conditions there'll be no significant change to them even after many years

    non-vulcanized rubber can be more supple, these days it is typically used in some brands of high-quality tubs and clinchers, these do 'age', the rubber becoming a bit tougher over time at the cost of a smidge of ultimate grip (but still very grippy)

    i've got a stack of tubs of various ages, current oldest probably 6-7 years, not planned, just happens that way, they are kept on their sides in the dark, i tend to use the old/repaired ones for winter as they will be a bit tougher and harder to cut, and keep the new supplest/stickiest for the better seasons

    Non vulcanised rubber? I'd consider myself lucky to be able to ride to the end of the road on non vulcanised rubber... :roll:
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    https://forums.roadbikereview.com/pro-c ... 35152.html

    people been storing tubs for decades. old hat stuff, see.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • sungodsungod Posts: 12,207
    Non vulcanised rubber? I'd consider myself lucky to be able to ride to the end of the road on non vulcanised rubber... :roll:
    :roll:
    http://www.challengetech.it/info/technology/en
    https://www.velonews.com/2011/02/bikes- ... ing_160921
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • sungod wrote:
    Non vulcanised rubber? I'd consider myself lucky to be able to ride to the end of the road on non vulcanised rubber... :roll:
    :roll:
    http://www.challengetech.it/info/technology/en
    https://www.velonews.com/2011/02/bikes- ... ing_160921
    There's a colloquial use or a scientific term going on here I think. The term "rubber" here is being used generically. The term "vulcanising" means curing or cross linking. A truly "non vulcanised" rubber would be a thermoplastic and most such materials would flow under pressure and would not be suitable for use as the elastomeric part of a tyre.

    I suspect that the distinction in ye olde worlde parlance of cycling is the difference between a tyre made by hand from a relatively soft rubber, which is then allowed to cure or further cure, vs a mamufacturing process (compression moulding) subjects a material to higher temperatures and pressures. Such a process would necessarily promote any curing process and so take it further and faster. Probably allows the use of entirely different materials as well.

    Ye olde worlde cyclists probably reason that ye
    olde ways are ye best and that new fangled 20th century technology is worse. They just might not be right about that.
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