Forum home Road cycling forum Indoor training and turbo forum

Do you use the same cassette on your turbo and your bike?

dubcatdubcat Posts: 831
If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?
2010 Specialized Rockhopper
2012 Bianchi Infinito

Posts

  • Tetragrammaton1Tetragrammaton1 Posts: 72
    edited November 2018
    Dubcat wrote:
    If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?

    In the ideal world you would have one dedicated chain and cassette for the bike whilst out riding in the real world , and a dedicated chain and cassette for the turbo. I don’t know many people who’d actually bother though. Obviously you’d get through a few quick links over time, but hey ho.
  • dubcatdubcat Posts: 831
    Dubcat wrote:
    If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?

    In the ideal world you would have one dedicated chain and cassette for the bike whilst out riding in the real world , and a dedicated chain and cassette for the turbo. I don’t know many people who’d actually bother though.

    So what do they do? use two cassettes and one chain? or switch the cassette from wheel to trainer?
    2010 Specialized Rockhopper
    2012 Bianchi Infinito
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,498
    Dedicated bike on the turbo ... problem solved.
  • Dubcat wrote:
    Dubcat wrote:
    If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?

    In the ideal world you would have one dedicated chain and cassette for the bike whilst out riding in the real world , and a dedicated chain and cassette for the turbo. I don’t know many people who’d actually bother though.

    So what do they do? use two cassettes and one chain? or switch the cassette from wheel to trainer?

    Use quick links. The ones on the turbo chain would be perfectly fine to reuse, you’d probably have to replace the link for the chain On the bike if you then used it in the real world, if you wanted to be super safe, as there’s no risk of ending up bouncing down the road if the trainer chain failed whilst on the trainer, at the re used quick link point.
  • dubcatdubcat Posts: 831
    Dubcat wrote:
    Dubcat wrote:
    If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?

    In the ideal world you would have one dedicated chain and cassette for the bike whilst out riding in the real world , and a dedicated chain and cassette for the turbo. I don’t know many people who’d actually bother though.

    So what do they do? use two cassettes and one chain? or switch the cassette from wheel to trainer?

    Use quick links. The ones on the turbo chain would be perfectly fine to reuse, you’d probably have to replace the link for the chain On the bike if you then used it in the real world, if you wanted to be super safe, as there’s no risk of ending up bouncing down the road if the trainer chain failed whilst on the trainer, at the re used quick link point.

    Sorry - what does that mean? I've not been on or around bikes for several years.
    2010 Specialized Rockhopper
    2012 Bianchi Infinito
  • grenwgrenw Posts: 788
    Got an old bike permanently on a direct drive turbo now. Before that when I had a wheel on turbo, I had an old wheel with a turbo tyre on and its own cassette. The chain stayed with the bike. Never seemed to be a problem

    Changing a wheel over was as much as I would be bothered to do. Changing a cassette over a couple of times a week. No thanks!
  • Yep.
    I use the same cassette on my road wheels as on the turbo.

    I have two bikes, when one is on the trainer the other is on the road (Summer and winter bikes)
  • dubcatdubcat Posts: 831
    OK - i only have one bike and it can't live on the turbo. So, are you guys suggesting I switch the cassette from bike to trainer and vice versa rather than just buying a new cassette for the trainer then?
    2010 Specialized Rockhopper
    2012 Bianchi Infinito
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,258
    Dubcat wrote:
    If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?

    They may very well wear at marginally different rates - but this is unlikely to lead to 'problems'. Not worthy of concern, IMO...
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Is this a wheel off turbo ?
  • When I got my Direto last Xmas, I fitted the spare new 11-32 cassette I had onto the direct drive axle and kept the existing cassette on the original Cube wheels, plus used the existing chain. A little "clunky" on initial gear shifting, but not too bad, as the Cube has still yet to do a proper rainy ride (so chain not that worn).

    When I swapped out the cassette and chain on the Cube wheel two weekends ago, I purposely stayed in 34/18 while using the turbo again for the first time since April for the first few rides, before doing some gear shifts during a "race" view of Paterburg on Road Grand Tours on Sunday... Shifts were pretty good, much less "clunky" than I remember last Xmas.
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • Dubcat wrote:
    Dubcat wrote:
    Dubcat wrote:
    If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?

    In the ideal world you would have one dedicated chain and cassette for the bike whilst out riding in the real world , and a dedicated chain and cassette for the turbo. I don’t know many people who’d actually bother though.

    So what do they do? use two cassettes and one chain? or switch the cassette from wheel to trainer?

    Use quick links. The ones on the turbo chain would be perfectly fine to reuse, you’d probably have to replace the link for the chain On the bike if you then used it in the real world, if you wanted to be super safe, as there’s no risk of ending up bouncing down the road if the trainer chain failed whilst on the trainer, at the re used quick link point.

    Sorry - what does that mean? I've not been on or around bikes for several years.

    Ignore him. He's assuming the quick link may fail if you reuse it. I've never seen a quick link fail and I rarely throw them away.
  • handfulhandful Posts: 918
    Maybe I've got this wrong but direct drive turbos are generally higher end with a decent erg mode so there is very minimal gear changing to worry about so different cassettes should be fine? Shouldn't they?
    Vaaru Titanium Sram eTap HRD
    Kuota Kharma Evo Rival 22 - fair weather
    Moda Chord with drop bars and Rival shifters - foul weather
    Intense Spider 29er - mud
  • handful wrote:
    Maybe I've got this wrong but direct drive turbos are generally higher end with a decent erg mode so there is very minimal gear changing to worry about so different cassettes should be fine? Shouldn't they?

    ERG mode sets resistance based on power, you still need to change gear to get the cadence for the intervals or to get up hills on Zwift.

    Check to see how worn the chain is first? If it’s in good condition then a seperate new cassette will be fine - just give the chain a good clean when swapping between outdoors and indoors. If it’s worn passed .5 on the chain checker replace current cassette, chain on the bike and use the new cassette on the turbo.

    In future save some money and buy/build a dedicated turbo bike. Really is the way forward!
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,289
    Fit a dedicated cassette and stop worrying about it.
    Also, ignore the guy saying that this is bad advice.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • I use separate cassettes as I don’t have a separate bike for the turbo. Never noticed any issues with poor shifting or chain wear to date.
  • Dubcat wrote:
    Dubcat wrote:
    Dubcat wrote:
    If I use different cassettes (same mode/type obviously) on my smart turbo and my bike, won't they wear at different rates, leading to problems? Or, do you guys switch the cassette from your bike to your turbo and vice versa?

    In the ideal world you would have one dedicated chain and cassette for the bike whilst out riding in the real world , and a dedicated chain and cassette for the turbo. I don’t know many people who’d actually bother though.

    So what do they do? use two cassettes and one chain? or switch the cassette from wheel to trainer?

    Use quick links. The ones on the turbo chain would be perfectly fine to reuse, you’d probably have to replace the link for the chain On the bike if you then used it in the real world, if you wanted to be super safe, as there’s no risk of ending up bouncing down the road if the trainer chain failed whilst on the trainer, at the re used quick link point.

    Sorry - what does that mean? I've not been on or around bikes for several years.

    Ignore him. He's assuming the quick link may fail if you reuse it. I've never seen a quick link fail and I rarely throw them away.

    Why would they ignore someone who clearly has more experience of the subject than some of the posters on this thread, and for avoidance of doubt, this means you, and has learned and adjusted through that experience? Isn’t that the idea of a forum?
  • Dubcat wrote:

    Sorry - what does that mean? I've not been on or around bikes for several years.

    It means that quick links are ( generally/ usually) inherently weaker than pinned links, and if you go for accepted ‘best practice’, re using a quick link isn’t the best idea, the problem comes when you have to balance this against the ‘best practice’ of a dedicated chain with a dedicated cassette, but that’s a whole new argument.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,258
    Why would they ignore someone who clearly has more experience of the subject than some of the posters on this thread,

    Because you are a clueless, deluded troll. None of your claims to 'superior knowledge' ever stack up. You clearly lack knowledge - and worst of all, from everyone else's point of view, you clearly lack any sort of credibility.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,258

    It means that quick links are ( generally/ usually) inherently weaker than pinned links,

    Once again, this is complete and utter nonsense with no basis in fact. If it were true, a chain would always fail at the joining link - which it doesn't.
  • Imposter wrote:

    It means that quick links are ( generally/ usually) inherently weaker than pinned links,

    Once again, this is complete and utter nonsense with no basis in fact. If it were true, a chain would always fail at the joining link - which it doesn't.

    It depends on the usage, if you put a lot of work through the chain, until very recently, the quick links were a poor choice. They worked well in an emergency, but couldn’t hold a candle to pinned links. Things have got better recently, to the extent that Shimano supply their chains with Q links now.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,258
    Imposter wrote:

    It means that quick links are ( generally/ usually) inherently weaker than pinned links,

    Once again, this is complete and utter nonsense with no basis in fact. If it were true, a chain would always fail at the joining link - which it doesn't.

    It depends on the usage, if you put a lot of work through the chain, until very recently, the quick links were a poor choice. They worked well in an emergency, but couldn’t hold a candle to pinned links. Things have got better recently, to the extent that Shimano supply their chains with Q links now.

    Again, that's absolute made-up nonsense. I don't know if you do this deliberately, or if you genuinely can't help yourself.
  • Imposter wrote:

    Once again, this is complete and utter nonsense with no basis in fact. If it were true, a chain would always fail at the joining link - which it doesn't.

    Based on good old experience/ mileage.
  • Mileage uploaded twice doesn't add to component wear.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,258
    Imposter wrote:

    Once again, this is complete and utter nonsense with no basis in fact. If it were true, a chain would always fail at the joining link - which it doesn't.

    Based on good old experience/ mileage.

    Your claimed 'experience' and 'mileage' counts for nothing though - because your answers show that you evidently have no real knowledge of the topics you comment on. Stop embarrassing yourself like this.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,289
    Experience/mileage is an interesting proposition.
    It results in the higher your mileage, the lower the coefficient. Making sense....
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
Sign In or Register to comment.