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Thoughts on Scott Foil 10? (New bike around £3k)

MishMash95MishMash95 Posts: 104
edited October 2018 in Road buying advice
Hey,
I'm currently quite keen on getting a new bike. Not quite sure exactly what I want, nor how much I want to spend just yet as still getting a feel for what you can get for your money. After a bit of research, it seems that going for a reasonable aero bike is the best bet. While I do love climbing, my current bike is 9.5kg anyway, so most aero bikes will still be a fair bit lighter than that anyway, and it does seem to cost quite a bit more to really get the weight down

I've come across the Scott foil 10 which i've seen at around the ~£3000 mark for a 7.5kg build, ultegra groupset and the standard Scott HMF carbon aero frame. Also interested in thoughts on disc breaks? They do look solid, but tend to incur a higher cost and a ~400g weight sacrifice for similar tier models.

Looks like quite a fast bike, but wanted to get some thoughts/opinions. Also quite tempted by a similar tier Canyon aeroad :shock:

Any suggestions would be appreciated :)

Posts

  • w00dsterw00dster Posts: 880
    I have the Canyon Aeroad, really happy with it. Mine is the Ultegra DI2 CF SLX version. Mine is just a tad over £4k.
    Canyon have recently released a non SLX version of the frame, Ultegra and fairly nice looking 58mm wheels coming in at £3k. Weighing in at 7.3kgs for a medium.

    https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/road/aeroa ... l-8-0.html

    The Foil is nice, but you'll need to factor in the cost of new wheels. An aero bike and shall rim wheels is all sorts of wrong!
    Disc brakes, hmmm. You need to make your own mind up on this. My winter/wet weather bike has disc brakes. But that's not for stopping power, that's just because I can fit wider and knobbly tyres. That said, for wet rides in mountainous terrain (Snowdon for example), I like having 32mm slicks and disc brakes. For the majority of my rides though I'm more than happy on rim brakes on a carbon rim. I'm sure lots of other people are loving their disc brakes and rightly so.
  • MishMash95 wrote:
    Hey,
    I'm currently quite keen on getting a new bike. Not quite sure exactly what I want, nor how much I want to spend just yet as still getting a feel for what you can get for your money. After a bit of research, it seems that going for a reasonable aero bike is the best bet. While I do love climbing, my current bike is 9.5kg anyway, so most aero bikes will still be a fair bit lighter than that anyway, and it does seem to cost quite a bit more to really get the weight down

    I've come across the Scott foil 10 which i've seen at around the ~£3000 mark for a 7.5kg build, ultegra groupset and the standard Scott HMF carbon aero frame. Also interested in thoughts on disc breaks? They do look solid, but tend to incur a higher cost and a ~400g weight sacrifice for similar tier models.

    Looks like quite a fast bike, but wanted to get some thoughts/opinions. Also quite tempted by a similar tier Canyon aeroad :shock:

    Any suggestions would be appreciated :)

    I had the non-disc version of this bike but didn't get on with it. I found the rear very springy for a race bike and the seat post was constantly slipping, even after applying contact paste. Ended up selling it pretty quickly as it just wasn't right for me. On the plus side the rim brake version did take 28c tyres.

    For that amount of money you really need to test it out.

    I love the look of the Aeroad though, personally I'd go for that over the Foil
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I do like the look of the foil.
    Unconvinced on disk brakes though. Either people can't set them up correctly, or they've got issues.
    Lots of threads on the problems with them - compared to almost none about rim brake issues.
  • Having had both, I'd probably go with the Aeroad SL with Reynolds 58 wheels for £2500
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • borisfaceborisface Posts: 273
    I've got one of the older foils with di2 and had it for 4 years. Its a great bike. Can;t think why I'd swap it for something else. Don't want disc brakes, ever as they are heavy and a PITA. Having said that the new aero canyon with the reynolds wheels looks a whole lot of bike for your money.
  • Yeah, I am liking the look of the Aeroad now :) 200g lighter and with those aero wheels, the only immediate downside is lack of finance options through Canyon. While isn't a huge factor, it is something that can make you feel more comfortable if something goes wrong.

    Thanks for the comments :)
  • w00dsterw00dster Posts: 880
    0% interest credit card an option?
    I find the Aeroad is longer and lower than other frames. Just need to think carefully about the sizing. I'm a shorty, 5 foot 8, but fairly used to aggressive frames (Trek H1 Madone and H1 Emonda). I've gone for a size small Aeroad, which is similar to a 54 in other manufacturers sizes. I'd spend a bit longer looking at your own setup and checking to see what size will fit. The online fit calculator is just a basic guide. (I'm normally a 52 in other bikes but for the Aeroad I wanted to be just a bit longer in the top tube)
    PS - if you live near Milton Keynes and wanted to try out a size small feel free to let me know. I was lucky enough to have a club mate with a size small so had a test ride. Worth doing it before you splash out quite a lot of cash.
  • DavidW007 wrote:
    I had the non-disc version of this bike but didn't get on with it. I found the rear very springy for a race bike and the seat post was constantly slipping, even after applying contact paste. Ended up selling it pretty quickly as it just wasn't right for me. On the plus side the rim brake version did take 28c tyres.

    For that amount of money you really need to test it out.

    I love the look of the Aeroad though, personally I'd go for that over the Foil

    I have the Foil Premium (which has the HMX frame and rim brakes) but other than weight, I doubt it would handle much differently to an HMF frame. Not sure what you mean about a "springy" rear end? The Foil has a very substantial bb area and thick chain stays and I've not experienced any flex in the frame. The springiness (or flex) maybe came from the wheels? - the stock ones on the Foil HMFs are not great (as with most bikes). Also have had zero problems with the seatpost slipping, assembled with carbon paste and correctly torqued there shouldn't be an issue, but manufacturing defects can obviously occur with any brand.

    I absolutely love my Foil but looking for a new n+1 at the moment. I'm considering a Canyon Ultimate SL Disc but these new Aeroad SLs do look fantastic value. The bonus being they come with great wheels as standard and provided you buy the right size, the only thing that may need changing is the saddle (a personal thing). As has been said, dropping about 3k on a bike is a big decision for most of us and there aren't that many around that price point offering the apparent value of Canyon, especially when no wheel upgrade is needed to make a great bike.

    My Foil was bought as a used, but as new frame module which I built up with DA R9100 mechanical and wheelsmith wheels and cost me about 3.5k all in. However, pampered used / nearly new frames seem to be increasingly rare, with sellers asking unrealistic money for them (on ebay at least). I think I got lucky with the Foil and if buying a new 'best' bike now and spending that sort of money, I'd seriously be looking at Canyon. That Movistar blue fade paint scheme is particularly appealing.

    I've no personal experience but the main trouble with Canyon seem to be their business model and the potential wait if the bike is not from stock. A friend recently waited about 3-4 months for an Ultimate CF SL frame, only to cancel as they could not say when it would be delivered. Guess thats how they keep costs down, by not over stocking bikes they then have problems selling.

    Enjoy the hunt OP, all part of the fun!
    Scott Addict RC
    Scott Foil Premium
    Trek Emonda Disc
    Scott Solace 10
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