Out of shape, preparing new season - advice on setup

Jay85be
Jay85be Posts: 8
edited October 2018 in Road beginners
Hi,

I'll place this in the beginner forum although I'm not really one.

I've been inactive most of the year due to various personal reasons but I was able to test my current shape a few weeks back on the Ventoux (holidays closeby), I barely got to Chalet Reynard. Although I'm not a pure climber. I do want to start preparing for next season again, I'm an avid classics cyclo participant in Belgium (except for the past year). So i'm checking to see what I should be starting with again.

I bought my bike with Q-rings 2 years ago (50-36 11-28) and i tried the Ventoux with NoQ 50-34. I'm thinking of trying my Q-rings again. I'm just not sure what to go with at this moment. I could do a 50-36 Q-ring (was adviced in the store to swap the 50-34 ultegra with when I bought the bike) with either an 11-28 or 11-30 cassette. Or I could use a Q-ring 34 as well. I know i'll have some issues getting up hills the early months, but I assume a 36 will smooth out the shifting a bit (and it seems the equivalent of a 34 round, at least its what I'm told).

So i'm thinking of just getting used to the 50-36 Q again and maybe start with the 30 cassette, to swap that after a while. Or should I rather start with a 34 and swap that later, and keep the 28 cassette? I usually run typical Belgian roads, flat with short classics climbs.

Thanks in advance

Comments

  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    You're thinking too much ...
    Ride your bike ... if you don't have enough low gears then either ride up something not so steep/long or get a bigger cassette on it ...
  • Slowbike wrote:
    You're thinking too much ...
    Ride your bike ... if you don't have enough low gears then either ride up something not so steep/long or get a bigger cassette on it ...

    haha yeah maybe I am.

    I'm just considering some variables. I haven't used a 50/34 Q yet, but have the ring, and i barely found the perfect shifting with the 50/36 so I'm not keen on trying the 34 Q.

    I guess that's why i'm unsure whether to focus on the small chainring at first or just the cassette.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Q rings are no replacement for a lack of fitness. TIme in the saddle is what you need and your gearing preferences will be clearer after a few more months of riding..
  • Imposter wrote:
    Q rings are no replacement for a lack of fitness. TIme in the saddle is what you need and your gearing preferences will be clearer after a few more months of riding..

    I never stated that. I just went for them at the bike purchase early 2016. But thats not the factor or the discussion I want to start. i'm just doubting whether to start off with a 34 or use the 36 and just focus on the cassette right now.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Jay85be wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    Q rings are no replacement for a lack of fitness. TIme in the saddle is what you need and your gearing preferences will be clearer after a few more months of riding..

    I never stated that. I just went for them at the bike purchase early 2016. But thats not the factor or the discussion I want to start. i'm just doubting whether to start off with a 34 or use the 36 and just focus on the cassette right now.

    Like I said though, your gearing choices will become easier to select once you have your fitness back. Makes sense to fit the widest range of gears you have right now - but those might change later. Whether it's 'Q' or round really makes no practical difference..
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    It's your out of shape edness that's the main problem.

    Q rings are a distraction.
  • If you got the necessary bits to hand, or are happy to buy them, expand the range of gearing you have available if you are concerned your current setup could be a struggle for now while "out of shape."

    Smaller chainrings
    Bigger range cassettes such as 11-32, or even 11-34
    New chain with more links
    Possible medium, or even long cage rear mech
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • pottssteve
    pottssteve Posts: 4,069
    Don't buy upgrades....ride up grades.
    Head Hands Heart Lungs Legs
  • pottssteve wrote:
    Don't buy upgrades....ride up grades.

    For most people, the only way to acquire upgrades is to buy them. Some may even turn to crime to acquire them but very very few cyclists get bikes and parts handed to them. So do buy upgrades, then ride the **** outta them.

    ****in q-rings!
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    pottssteve wrote:
    Don't buy upgrades....ride up grades.

    For most people, the only way to acquire upgrades is to buy them. Some may even turn to crime to acquire them but very very few cyclists get bikes and parts handed to them. So do buy upgrades, then ride the **** outta them.

    ****in q-rings!

    Think you might have misunderstood....
  • Imposter wrote:
    Jay85be wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    Q rings are no replacement for a lack of fitness. TIme in the saddle is what you need and your gearing preferences will be clearer after a few more months of riding..

    I never stated that. I just went for them at the bike purchase early 2016. But thats not the factor or the discussion I want to start. i'm just doubting whether to start off with a 34 or use the 36 and just focus on the cassette right now.

    Like I said though, your gearing choices will become easier to select once you have your fitness back. Makes sense to fit the widest range of gears you have right now - but those might change later. Whether it's 'Q' or round really makes no practical difference..

    Utter Nonsense.

    If he fits the widest possible range now, he’ll never start improving.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Imposter wrote:
    Jay85be wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    Q rings are no replacement for a lack of fitness. TIme in the saddle is what you need and your gearing preferences will be clearer after a few more months of riding..

    I never stated that. I just went for them at the bike purchase early 2016. But thats not the factor or the discussion I want to start. i'm just doubting whether to start off with a 34 or use the 36 and just focus on the cassette right now.

    Like I said though, your gearing choices will become easier to select once you have your fitness back. Makes sense to fit the widest range of gears you have right now - but those might change later. Whether it's 'Q' or round really makes no practical difference..

    Utter Nonsense.

    If he fits the widest possible range now, he’ll never start improving.

    Nick, you contrarian troll. You really are showing how clueless you are. Feel free to enlarge on your post and give us all a laugh..
  • craigus89
    craigus89 Posts: 887
    Utter Nonsense.

    If he fits the widest possible range now, he’ll never start improving.

    Yes because the only way to get fit on a bike is by grinding up 15% slopes.
  • stueys
    stueys Posts: 1,332
    Fit the gears you need for your fitness, there is nothing more demoralising than blowing up on hills due to poor gearing. Equally your natural cadence might just work better on lower gearing, I'm at 4w/kg (a fairly good club rider) and I ran a 50-34/11-30 when I did the Marmotte this year, I climb much faster when I can spin. In the UK I either don't use the gears or just swap back to semi-compact.

    Re Q-Rings, they work fine on a 50-34. I would run 50-34 and an 11-30 and see how you go from there. The absolute worse case is you'll have gears you aren't using, that's a better scenario than not having the gears you need.
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,881
    34 or 36, 28 or 30 - not a great deal of difference there. If you are worried about getting up hills then go for the lowest option that doesn't require too much time and money.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]