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Bearing Extraction/Installation Tools Run Down

joey54321joey54321 Posts: 1,297
edited September 2018 in Workshop
I have a number of sets of bearings on my bikes which need replacing (two front hubs and hopefully a jockey wheel) which has led me to look up the 'right tools for the job'. However, this has just resulted in a whole lot of confusion as there are lots of words/tools which I don't understand. Can anyone give me a laymans breakdown of what is/isn't needed? And maybe what the following terms are:

Drift

Driver

Slide hammer

Bearing Puller

Bearing Support Bush

Bearing blind side



:?

Thanks!

Posts

  • sungodsungod Posts: 12,315
    depends on the specific hubs

    jockey wheel is typically remove old one, fit new one
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • joey54321joey54321 Posts: 1,297
    sungod wrote:
    depends on the specific hubs

    jockey wheel is typically remove old one, fit new one

    But how do you remove it?
  • arlowoodarlowood Posts: 2,405
    joey54321 wrote:
    sungod wrote:
    depends on the specific hubs

    jockey wheel is typically remove old one, fit new one

    But how do you remove it?

    Maybe this video might help

    https://www.mantel.com/blog/en/how-to-c ... lleys/#ch3
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    joey54321 wrote:
    sungod wrote:
    depends on the specific hubs

    jockey wheel is typically remove old one, fit new one

    But how do you remove it?

    With an Allen key, generally.

    Try the Parktools link in my sig.

    What you need depends on the hubs.

    Cup and cone?

    Cartridge bearings?
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Drift

    The object used to push a bearing. preferably made to fit exactly to stop damage to the new bearing. using the old bearing or a suitable socket is the old school way. The idea is not to press on the bearings themselves.

    Driver

    something used to push out or in, an older term

    Slide hammer

    a collet is inserted into the bearing and tightened to expand it and fix it. A rod is attached to the collet. There is a heavy weight on the rod, this is the slide. The weight is whizzed to the end to effect force on the bearing and pull it out. The advantage is the bearing should come out straight and not damage the face of the material the bearing sits in. Very expensive to buy a cycling specific one or about £20 to get a general purpose one that works perfectly on ebay.

    Bearing Puller

    this is another device that pulls bearings usually that are captured on a shaft of some kind. in cycling the campag ultratorque is the crankset where you need a specialist bit of kit like this.

    Bearing Support Bush some mountain biking term so a dark art and should never be mentioned here :)

    Bearing blind side

    the inside side of the bearing that you cant see (unless you peer through from the back)
  • there are loads of tools that do some or all of what you need but in short you will need something to press bearings into Hubs, frame pivots, bottom brackets.

    the wheels manufacturing large press does all of that but costs. there are wheel specific kits from Hope DT Swiss etc these are kin expensive too.

    Getting bearings out is a minefield of conflicting advice and tools. They can be pressed out (makes you feel like everything is safe and under control) or they can be knocked out either with a drift and a hammer, a collett to centre the drift so it comes out straight or a slide hammer. ive tried them all and with a bit of care and common sense they all work perfectly well.

    The best options bring the bearing out straight not a bit at a time. this preserves the integrity and shape of the material into which the bearing is pushed. a slide hammer set is the cheapest and most flexible option for this. https://www.amazon.co.uk/FreeTec-Bearin ... mmer&psc=1 should do all you need for hubs and bottom brackets but i think id just stick to a hammer and drift for frame linkages.
  • Vino'sGhostVino'sGhost Posts: 4,320
    edited September 2018
    cup and cone hubs.

    more and more hubs are using cartridge bearings not cup and cone. Shimano are the biggies still using cup and cone but their latest "digital" hubs are a piece of pi ss to service and dont require any cone spanners. A magnet is very useful though.
  • joey54321joey54321 Posts: 1,297
    arlowood wrote:
    joey54321 wrote:
    sungod wrote:
    depends on the specific hubs

    jockey wheel is typically remove old one, fit new one

    But how do you remove it?

    Maybe this video might help

    https://www.mantel.com/blog/en/how-to-c ... lleys/#ch3

    That video is about replacing the jockey wheel, I want to remove the bearing on an existing jockey wheel.

    Thanks Vino, all of that info is awesome and just what I was after!
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    Remove the side plates and push the bearing out with your finger. The plates will probably just fall off as nothing holds them on once unscrewed.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
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