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Shimano chains. Asymmetric, Directional etc.

velo.2010velo.2010 Posts: 48
edited September 2018 in Workshop
Hi there.
Just wondering what the difference is between a directional and asymmetric chain. I've always used directional chains and kept the Shimano logos facing out. How does an asymmetric chain differ? Does it being 'super narrow' have an effect?

I ask because I picked up a Shimano Dura Ace CN HG 901 chain a couple of months back to replace a worn 5800 chain. The chain was fitted as usual with the logos facing out. The chain runs well on the small chainring but its not as smooth on the big chainring.

Would appreciate someone explaining the difference between the likes of Dura Ace HG 900 and HG 901 or 105 HG 600 and HG 601.

Posts

  • The directional chains are designed so that the outer plates are optimised for chain ring shifts, and the inner plates are optimised for cassette shifts, so the difference between a directional and non directional chain is the different designs of the inner and outer plates. Asymmetric chains are optimised for bikes with asymmetric chain stays.
  • Asymmetric chains are optimised for bikes with asymmetric chain stays.
    :|
  • Asymmetric chains are optimised for bikes with asymmetric chain stays.
    :|

    Because the effect on chain pull is different on a bike with asymmetric stays.

    As explained by Pinarello.

    Here.


    http://www.pinarello.com/en/technology/think-asymmetric
  • This seller seems to explain it all. https://www.competitivecyclist.com/shim ... n-11-speed
  • Asymmetric chains are optimised for bikes with asymmetric chain stays.
    :|

    Because the effect on chain pull is different on a bike with asymmetric stays.

    As explained by Pinarello.

    Here.


    http://www.pinarello.com/en/technology/think-asymmetric

    Ummm...
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,965
    Asymmetric chains are optimised for bikes with asymmetric chain stays.
    :|

    Because the effect on chain pull is different on a bike with asymmetric stays.

    As explained by Pinarello.

    Here.


    http://www.pinarello.com/en/technology/think-asymmetric

    Milemuncher once again confusing marketing hype with science fact.. :roll:

    OP - I would suggest you disregard this guy's replies - he's on his third user account now...
  • I don't mean to be a d1ck, but I seem to keep stumbling on threads where he is posting and it is always absolute nonsense. Either he is genuinely an idiot or one of the best trolls I've come across.
  • Just trying to understand the nomenclature of Shimano's chains. I think I have the asymmetric HG901-11 on the bike. And I think that may be part of why the chain on the big ring is not as smooth as the HG601 (5800 105) symmetric chain on my other 5800 equipped bike.
    AFAIK the HG 901 relates to chains compatible with E_bikes and MTB's. Where a Q appears with the chain code refers to it coming with a quicklink. The HG 901 is the updated version of the HG 900 to cope with e-bikes. HG 901-11 is the asymmetric code.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,965
    Craigus89 wrote:
    I don't mean to be a d1ck, but I seem to keep stumbling on threads where he is posting and it is always absolute nonsense. Either he is genuinely an idiot or one of the best trolls I've come across.

    I think it must be deliberate, as nobody can be that ignorant by chance. To claim that asymmetric chains are intended for bikes with asymmetric chainstays is to completely misunderstand what Shimano means when it uses the word. The fact that Pinarello also uses the word to describe an aspect of its frame design is incidental and completely irrelevant in this context.
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