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Online Language Lessons

ProssPross Posts: 25,424
edited October 2018 in The cake stop
I’ve been thinking of trying to learn a foreign language (probably French) and wondered if anyone has experience of any free sites / You Tube channels etc. that are good sources for this?

Posts

  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    let me dig out the name of the one that TDV's parents used to teach them sqelves Spanish. i'll get back to you in a tad.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • mr_goomr_goo Posts: 3,755
    DuoLingo

    I guess you were also listening to Radio 5 Live on Tuesday morning....... Learning a foreign language helps stave off the onset of dementia.
    Always be yourself, unless you can be Aaron Rodgers....Then always be Aaron Rodgers.
  • crispybug2crispybug2 Posts: 2,915
    I learnt my perfunctory French and Spanish through a CD course by Michel Thomas

    This also available online and it worked for me
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 23,446 Lives Here
    My son has been using Duolingo. Found he could understand people but speaking it was harder.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 21,128
    If you have an audible subscription, download the Collin's French course (make sure you get the whole one with your credit, they also do the seperate editions). I found it really great to remind me of stuff I'd learnt at school but needed refining...

    I'm quite liking the innovative language course for Dutch too, which im learning from scratch...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,677
    If you can get to the point you can understand a lot, the speaking comes with time, although you have to truly immerse yourself in the country. I was lucky when I spent some time on fronce that I had a really solid classroom background in French but it transpired that my accent was incomprehensible to the french. After 2-3 months studying out there barely being understood I was chuckled at by a French girl at a party for having a regional, Savoyard accent. Possibly the best compliment I have ever received.
  • ProssPross Posts: 25,424
    Thanks all. I hadn't heard the Radio 5 piece, it was more being on holiday and whilst I make an effort with half remembered words from GCSE French I'd like to be able to get by in conversations without having to rely on the French person speaking decent English. Whilst I have obviously lost most of what I learned in school over the past 30 years the fact I somehow got a C in GCSE with my limited skills probably shows how poorly languages are treated in this country which I guess is the downside of having a native language that is so widely spoken by others.
  • graeme_s-2graeme_s-2 Posts: 3,382
    Before our annual holiday to France my wife tends to listen to the Coffee Break French (I believe other languages are available) podcasts while driving to help brush up. Not convinced they'd be great for learning from scratch, but she finds them a really helpful refresher.
  • Another vote for Coffee Break French. Download the podcasts from iTunes - be aware there are a lot of them. I try to listen to them in the car, although I go through phases.

    I got an A in O-level French, but that was a long time ago and I also seem to have an incomprehensible accent to the French. Coffee Break French is great at filling in the gaps from O-level and refreshing my memory of the things I did learn.
    Never be tempted to race against a Barclays Cycle Hire bike. If you do, there are only two outcomes. Of these, by far the better is that you now have the scalp of a Boris Bike.
  • Oh yeah, and they have really basic courses for other languages - there is a really brief one on Dutch which I've used a few times when I've had to go to the Netherlands on business or pleasure. It's great for picking up the basics so you can at least be polite with please and thank-you, and so on.
    Never be tempted to race against a Barclays Cycle Hire bike. If you do, there are only two outcomes. Of these, by far the better is that you now have the scalp of a Boris Bike.
  • robert88robert88 Posts: 2,696
    If you can get to the point you can understand a lot, the speaking comes with time, although you have to truly immerse yourself in the country. I was lucky when I spent some time on fronce that I had a really solid classroom background in French but it transpired that my accent was incomprehensible to the french. After 2-3 months studying out there barely being understood I was chuckled at by a French girl at a party for having a regional, Savoyard accent. Possibly the best compliment I have ever received.

    I believe that's their equivalent of someone who sounds as if they are from South Shields :wink:
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Mr Goo wrote:
    DuoLingo

    I guess you were also listening to Radio 5 Live on Tuesday morning....... Learning a foreign language helps stave off the onset of dementia.


    That's the one.

    They really rate it.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,677
    robert88 wrote:
    If you can get to the point you can understand a lot, the speaking comes with time, although you have to truly immerse yourself in the country. I was lucky when I spent some time on fronce that I had a really solid classroom background in French but it transpired that my accent was incomprehensible to the french. After 2-3 months studying out there barely being understood I was chuckled at by a French girl at a party for having a regional, Savoyard accent. Possibly the best compliment I have ever received.

    I believe that's their equivalent of someone who sounds as if they are from South Shields :wink:

    Haha probably but it's where I was living so I'll take it! I wasnt as badly abused as the guy who had a south of France accent though!
  • grahamcpgrahamcp Posts: 322
    I use the coffee break french ones too. there are free podcasts or you can subscribe to get extended versions and written notes, I have subscribed to a couple of seasons and been very happy with them.
  • orraloonorraloon Posts: 7,539
    Another vote for the Coffee Break podcasts. On a refresher listen now to their Spanish ones, got a S American trip imminent, so need to brush up (and ditch the Castilian lithp).
  • FishFishFishFish Posts: 2,152
    I used learnassyrianinanhour.com and learned to speak and write in Ancient Egyptian - well Assyrian actually - hyroglyphics. Took me an hour and cost 40p plus VAT. Useful.
    ...take your pickelf on your holibobs.... :D

    jeez :roll:
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 18,941
    FishFish wrote:
    I used learnassyrianinanhour.com and learned to speak and write in Ancient Egyptian - well Assyrian actually - hyroglyphics. Took me an hour and cost 40p plus VAT. Useful.
    Assyrian would be written in cuneiform, not hieroglyphics. :roll:
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • FishFishFishFish Posts: 2,152
    Well thats what you get for 40p. (No doubt you will remind me to spell 'that's' as bonus pedantry.
    ...take your pickelf on your holibobs.... :D

    jeez :roll:
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 18,941
    FishFish wrote:
    Well thats what you get for 40p. (No doubt you will remind me to spell 'that's' as bonus pedantry.
    Well, if you will pretend to be clever.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • finchyfinchy Posts: 6,689
    Memrise.com is the best for learning vocabulary. It was created by neuroscientists and is based on spaced repetition, and if you spend 10-20 minutes a day, you will pick up a large vocabulary very quickly. See if your local library stocks Pimsleur. A bit dull, but good for grammar.
  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,443
    Michel Thomas Method.
    These are not online courses though, they come as CDs in various packages and you can often pick them up on ebay.

    I used the Greek one, it's good.


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • PepPep Posts: 501
    OK I am biased...
    but the bestest language teacher in the world ever happens to be my wife. She teaches japanese, via Skype, been doing that for the last 20yr, any level. If interested get in touch.
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 8,166
    veronese68 wrote:
    My son has been using Duolingo. Found he could understand people but speaking it was harder.

    I cite German as a second language - I did an A level and now I have German family (coincidence). I find the same as your son; I understand just about everything I read and hear. Speaking is a different kettle of fish because you just need to practice, practice and practice.

    What I'm saying is it's not a 'problem' limited to Duolingo; I think most people would experience the same whichever route they go down (unless it's living in the country and having to speak the language!).
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
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