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Waterproof hiking trousers or waterproof cycling trousers?

didiodidio Posts: 2
edited August 2018 in Commuting general
Hi there,

I've just started commuting on my bicycle, but a couple of rainy days have absolutely ruined my travels. I've got some waterproof hiking trousers I use to venture out into the mountains.

Would these work well for cycling or would you advise me to buy proper waterproof cycling trousers? If so, what is the difference between them?

Thank you!

Posts

  • roger_merrimanroger_merriman Posts: 6,159
    didio wrote:
    Hi there,

    I've just started commuting on my bicycle, but a couple of rainy days have absolutely ruined my travels. I've got some waterproof hiking trousers I use to venture out into the mountains.

    Would these work well for cycling or would you advise me to buy proper waterproof cycling trousers? If so, what is the difference between them?

    Thank you!

    I'd say any thing properly waterproof is going to get very warm very quickly. I commute at a relaxed pace, so I don't need to change etc, but even so waterproof gear unless it's mid winter is just too warm.
  • CitizenLeeCitizenLee Posts: 2,227
    I used Endura Humvee ¾ shorts in summer and Endura Gridlock II trousers for the other 51 weeks of the year :)

    Wouldn’t say either are too warm but both do keep my dry in the rain.

    Hiking trousers might be ok if the legs tapered enough that they won’t get stuck in your chain.

    The main differences would be the fit - cycling trousers are designed for how you sit on/ride a bike rather than simply walking.
    Current:
    NukeProof Mega FR 2012
    Cube NuRoad 2018
    Previous:
    2015 Genesis CdF 10, 2014 Cube Hyde Race, 2012 NS Traffic, 2007 Specialized SX Trail, 2005 Specialized Demo 8
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Do you have mudguards ? They're essential.

    As has been said - anything waterproof is going to make you sweat up. I'd take a spare pair and change in work if i were you.

    But mudguards. You need them.
  • crakercraker Posts: 1,739
    Neither. Just accept your legs are going to get wet, get changed into dry things when you get to the other end. Helps if you're cycling in material that doesn't soak up water (lycra's popular for a reason).

    Warm and wet is fine, cold and wet you may want to wear long tights. It's not a good look but it's practical ;-)
  • StorckSpeedStorckSpeed Posts: 291
    I actually agree with crakers comment above.
    However if you are determined to use waterproof trousers it would be best to get cycling specific waterproof trousers. Mainly because the knees have more flex in them and the bottom of the legs are tight to ensure they do not catch on the drive train.
    If you must use walking trousers then use a pair of trouser clips to ensure they don't snag and rip.
    There's warp speed - then there's Storck Speed
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    As someone who gets a quite sweaty, I commute in just shorts 11 1/2 months of the year and use knee warmers for the other 2 weeks. In fact apart from swapping from mitts to full finger gloves I commute in the same clothing any time its above circa +4C (even if there is still last nights frost still on the ground.

    Wearing waterproof trousers would probably result in me being wetter than in shorts.

    However if your a 'pootler' riding at more like a dutch pace then I can see some value in waterproof trousers.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Travelling through Germany the other week I saw a bloke with his folding bike. It was raining at the time and he was on the train in full waterproofs - trousers and jacket.

    Barefoot though.
  • karlmcrkarlmcr Posts: 16
    Long shorts & RainLegs for most of the year's rain.

    Berghaus Deluge trousers when I know it's going to be very heavy in the winter.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,029
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Waterproof-R ... ps_h8kurfg
    +
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Kleiber-Soft ... Sw~CRTrU98

    =
    rainlegs (elcheapo version2) and ideal for the not wanting to get caught out by a summer drenching... it takes about 1 minute 23 seconds to get drenched. I commute in my suit (jacket optional in this current heat) and the system sort of works. As mentioned, without mudguards you are on a hiding to nothing anyways.
  • The Rookie wrote:
    As someone who gets a quite sweaty, I commute in just shorts 11 1/2 months of the year and use knee warmers for the other 2 weeks. In fact apart from swapping from mitts to full finger gloves I commute in the same clothing any time its above circa +4C (even if there is still last nights frost still on the ground.

    Wearing waterproof trousers would probably result in me being wetter than in shorts.

    However if your a 'pootler' riding at more like a dutch pace then I can see some value in waterproof trousers.
    You sound similar to me - do you mind me asking what gear you wear?
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