Alien technology has landed - on a road bike

jspash
jspash Posts: 107
edited July 2018 in Workshop
Link first:
https://cyclingtips.com/2018/07/ceramic ... rivetrain/

I have to say that most new developments in bike tech have left me with an overwhelming sense of meh. But this! I can't even get my head around it. I mean, I get it. But the torque transfer just seems off somehow. It doesn't seem like it could possibly work and produce any sort of significant power over a simple chain & sprocket setup.

What does everyone else think? Is this the future of drivetrains? Or just an attempt at viral publicity? I'm torn...

Comments

  • Sutton_Rider
    Sutton_Rider Posts: 493
    This was on GCN the other day. It looks good and the figures sound impressive, but they don't mean too much to me. So for the same given effort how much faster could I go with this system on my bike as opposed to a standard chain setup?
  • Vino'sGhost
    Vino'sGhost Posts: 4,129
    it looks good but still only a single speed fixed drive train at present.

    On the plus side we wont get dirty chains on our calves or trousers.

    on the down side we'll get PTO shaft amuptations LOLOLOLOLOL
  • timothyw
    timothyw Posts: 2,482
    Well, I suppose it's nice that they weren't spending all the money from their incredibly expensive components on blow and hookers.

    At the moment though they've created a shaft drive bicycle, something that was new back in the 1890s.

    Still, if they make it work it does present an interesting way to get even more gears onto a bike than 12 speed.
  • keezx
    keezx Posts: 1,322
    This was on GCN the other day. It looks good and the figures sound impressive, but they don't mean too much to me. So for the same given effort how much faster could I go with this system on my bike as opposed to a standard chain setup?

    Let's assume the efficiency of the chain drive increases from 98% with a non-worn and lubricated chain to 99% with the new system.
    The total mechanical resistance of a roadbike is app, 5% , the rolling resistance is 20% , the rest 75% is air resistance.
    (at 20 MPH, the required power is 200W)
    Let's assume the chain part of the mechanical resistance is 50%, makes 5W , and this 5W will be app.4,95 W with the new super system.
    End result : in stead of 200 W , you need "only 199,95 W for the same speed.
    I think you need pretty expensive equipment to even measure the "gain" in speed.

    You want faster? Do'nt look at the mechanics.
  • Sutton_Rider
    Sutton_Rider Posts: 493
    Interesting Keezx. Assuming your numbers are correct, and I've no reason to doubt them, there seems to be no 'performance gain' advantages in using this system.
  • timothyw
    timothyw Posts: 2,482
    Well yeah, ceramic speed are pretty much snake oil salesmen - I mean, not quite, but for the money you spend, the amount of measurable gain is minuscule from a new set of £300 jockey wheels.

    Still, if this does lead to a greater range of gears with better ratios then that will undeniable allow riders to unlock that little bit more of their potential.
  • keezx
    keezx Posts: 1,322
    The problem is that the chain is an allready very efficient drive system and that the mechanical losses in general are by far the lowest of all losses.
    So it's the wrong place to seek for gain......
    Ceramicspeed knows, but there are other things to win....
  • Vino'sGhost
    Vino'sGhost Posts: 4,129
    all of that stuff about drive train efficiency is fine but its there to be had, you might as well have it. the little bits here and there small in themselves can add up to quite a good result.
  • timothyw
    timothyw Posts: 2,482
    Yeah, you might as well have it if you have a huge budget behind you and are paid for winning.

    If you have to work a job and cycle for recreation, like the rest of us, then you need to have a word with yourself before spending £400 on a set of jockey wheels that might save you a second on the club 10 mile TT.
  • The Rookie
    The Rookie Posts: 27,812
    The thing that worries me is all the torque is transferred by just 3 teeth at any one time, not the at least 5 (22t sprocket) with a chain system.
    Currently riding a Whyte T130C, X0 drivetrain, Magura Trail brakes converted to mixed wheel size (homebuilt wheels) with 140mm Fox 34 Rhythm and RP23 suspension. 12.2Kg.
  • IMO nothing will come of it.
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,736
    Having read comments from better qualified people than I it seems this isn't likely to be a goer but if it were might not aerodynamic gains be part of the advantage as well as gains in drive train efficiency?
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • cycleclinic
    cycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    what was shown at eurobike will break and fall aprt in use. if it does work it would require alot of development if it is ever reliable at all. The system ceramic speed are looking at has several engineering challanges to overcome and I am not sure they can be.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.