Astigmatism - contacts query

doogandoogan Posts: 30
edited July 2018 in Road general
Hi all

I have recently started using contact lenses to correct my astigmatism and after trialing a few pairs I have found the Acuvue Oasys for astigmatism work quite well in day to day life. I assumed they would work equally well on my bike so ordered a pair of non prescription jawbreakers. Unfortunately as soon as I started cycling the contacts must have started bouncing around because my vision went very blurry. It didn't really improve during a couple of hrs of cycling. As soon as I readjusted the lenses they would move out of sync almost immediately.

I was wondering if anyone else with astigmatism and wears contacts could share their experiences.

I'm not sure if the existing contacts will settle down with more wear or if I need different contact lenses or if I should get a pair of prescription glasses.

Cheers

Posts

  • graeme_s-2graeme_s-2 Posts: 3,777
    Speak to your optician? I have lenses to correct astigmatism. I don’t wear them very often (my astigmatism is pretty mild), but I’ve cycled and also run with them in and they’ve been fine. Are there other brands you could trial? I think I tried 3 different brands and settled on the 2nd.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Graeme_S wrote:
    Speak to your optician? I have lenses to correct astigmatism. I don’t wear them very often (my astigmatism is pretty mild), but I’ve cycled and also run with them in and they’ve been fine. Are there other brands you could trial? I think I tried 3 different brands and settled on the 2nd.

    I've actually gone ahead and set up a contract on this particular brand as they work well enough when I'm not on the bike. Unfortunately I didn't trial them on the bike beforehand (school boy error).

    I wondered if this was a common issue for people with astigmatism as the contact has to sit in the correct position in order for them to work. There must be a lot of road buzz going on to move them out of position.
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,002
    I have an asthgmatism in one eye and wear lenses in both. i have no problems unless on my TT bike, when I wear a helmet with visor, my vision is all over the wonk then so I don't wear them for racing.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Another option for me might be to get some Rudy Projects Rydon glasses with an optical insert - has any experience of those?
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,022
    Rydons with insert yes, but the insert sits very close to the eyes, but no real issue that would stop usage.
  • lakesludditelakesluddite Posts: 1,301
    I use the same brand and style of lens, and do everything in them, run, cycle, even swim (even though you're not supposed to, but what am I going to do, wear glasses!?). I've never had problems with slippage, either with these or my previous contacts. If anything, they tend to stick in place a little too much, sometimes they are hard to pull out, especially in the warmer dryer days that we are having now.
    I use mine for vision correction (short sight) only, not sure if astigmatism would affect them though?
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    I use the same brand and style of lens, and do everything in them, run, cycle, even swim (even though you're not supposed to, but what am I going to do, wear glasses!?). I've never had problems with slippage, either with these or my previous contacts. If anything, they tend to stick in place a little too much, sometimes they are hard to pull out, especially in the warmer dryer days that we are having now.
    I use mine for vision correction (short sight) only, not sure if astigmatism would affect them though?

    That's reassuring to hear - although makes me wonder what's going wrong for me!

    Could it just be a case of my eyes getting more used to wearing them? I'm not even 2 weeks in.
  • Not got experience of Rudy Project but I use Oakley prescription inserts and have astigmatism in both eyes. Work fine, because of the lens shape in sports optics being curved they do have a slight shortening effect with the field of vision (just makes things appear slightly squished together) but you quickly get used to it.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Not got experience of Rudy Project but I use Oakley prescription inserts and have astigmatism in both eyes. Work fine, because of the lens shape in sports optics being curved they do have a slight shortening effect with the field of vision (just makes things appear slightly squished together) but you quickly get used to it.

    Can you get those for Jawbreakers?
  • Can you get those for Jawbreakers?

    Yep mine are for jawbreakers. Got them from extreme eyewear but have also had lenses from rxsport as well (would recommend either). Depending on tint they'll set you back about £200 for the lens.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Can you get those for Jawbreakers?

    Yep mine are for jawbreakers. Got them from extreme eyewear but have also had lenses from rxsport as well (would recommend either). Depending on tint they'll set you back about £200 for the lens.

    Ah, nice one. How are the inserts on the jawbreaker? Work well?

    Cheers!
  • How are the inserts on the jawbreaker? Work well?

    Yeah, they are good. The jawbreaker is probably the best frame for prescription lenses as well as the inserts are larger than on other Oakley frames IME so they cover your full field of vision.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Sorry to be a pain. I couldn't see the optical inserts on extreme eyewear - is it possible they have been discontinued or am I being daft?
  • sungodsungod Posts: 11,709
    i wear toric contacts to correct astigmatism, never had the effects you describe

    surely if it were due to vibration it'd happen when walking, running, descending stairs etc., does it?

    if they are ok normally and it only happens when riding i'd think airflow across your eyes is the most likely cause, perhaps triggered/aggravated by not blinking enough

    try different glasses, or a moisturising eye spray - once contacts start to dry vision can become blurry and the lens may get distorted or even come out, it then takes a while for a lens to recover (many minutes)
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,291
    ^as above, have used toric contact lenses for some years now, with no issues, and with Oakley Prism Jawbreakers in the main. For the past year have also used toric mono-vision lenses to help with close vision in one eye and distance in the other. Very weird feeling at first but now don't even think about them when on the bike. Means I can safely see far ahead but still check out my Garmin when needed. Pretty remarkable how quickly the brain adapts, and seem to emulate my varifocal glasses, but one eye at a time!
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Tifosi CK7 - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
  • Sorry to be a pain. I couldn't see the optical inserts on extreme eyewear - is it possible they have been discontinued or am I being daft?

    No worries, try this link - https://www.extreme-eyewear.co.uk/product/oakley-jawbreaker-prescription-lenses-lenses-only-no-frame-needed/

    You get the full lens made with the prescription optical insert. Hope this is what you were after.
  • milemuncher1milemuncher1 Posts: 1,472
    Many many years ago, my job involved developing soft Toric lenses ( for correction of astigmatism). From my point of view, I’d say, if you can afford daily disposables, do so. The health of your eyes is pretty important, and although manufacturers try and tell you that ‘extended wear’ lenses are really good, they aren’t that good for your eyes. Part of my brief, all of those years ago, was to increase the oxygen permeability of the lenses. Although I achieved some real improvements, I still wouldn’t want to be increasing the risk of corneal Edema, associated with wearing soft contacts for extended periods. The other issue is the biocompatibility problem. I tried to improve the formulation of the hydrogel, to make it as ‘invisible’ to the immune system as possible, by getting it to mimick the natural tear film ( specifically Mucins, which are the key here ) Again, although I achieved some real improvements, the problem of protien build up, still remained, to an extent. Getting the physical designs right, was relative child’s play in comparison. The one thing that was achieved / improved, most markedly ( and this was 18 years ago ), was the robustness / durability / handleability, of the lenses, so risk of splitting / fragmentation, was vastly reduced. So in summary then, where possible, go for daily disposables, over extended wear, in my opinion, they are a far better option.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Thanks for all of the responses. I have them in now and vision is grand, no movement or blurryness while I'm walking about.

    I think I'll give these another couple of goes before I give up. I'll also try different glasses over them.

    If that doesn't work I'll probably try some Rudy Project Rydons with the optical clips.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Many many years ago, my job involved developing soft Toric lenses ( for correction of astigmatism). From my point of view, I’d say, if you can afford daily disposables, do so. The health of your eyes is pretty important, and although manufacturers try and tell you that ‘extended wear’ lenses are really good, they aren’t that good for your eyes. Part of my brief, all of those years ago, was to increase the oxygen permeability of the lenses. Although I achieved some real improvements, I still wouldn’t want to be increasing the risk of corneal Edema, associated with wearing soft contacts for extended periods. The other issue is the biocompatibility problem. I tried to improve the formulation of the hydrogel, to make it as ‘invisible’ to the immune system as possible, by getting it to mimick the natural tear film ( specifically Mucins, which are the key here ) Again, although I achieved some real improvements, the problem of protien build up, still remained, to an extent. Getting the physical designs right, was relative child’s play in comparison. The one thing that was achieved / improved, most markedly ( and this was 18 years ago ), was the robustness / durability / handleability, of the lenses, so risk of splitting / fragmentation, was vastly reduced. So in summary then, where possible, go for daily disposables, over extended wear, in my opinion, they are a far better option.

    Good insight, thanks. Unfortunately the dailies didn't work out for my prescription.
  • milemuncher1milemuncher1 Posts: 1,472
    doogan wrote:
    Many many years ago, my job involved developing soft Toric lenses ( for correction of astigmatism). From my point of view, I’d say, if you can afford daily disposables, do so. The health of your eyes is pretty important, and although manufacturers try and tell you that ‘extended wear’ lenses are really good, they aren’t that good for your eyes. Part of my brief, all of those years ago, was to increase the oxygen permeability of the lenses. Although I achieved some real improvements, I still wouldn’t want to be increasing the risk of corneal Edema, associated with wearing soft contacts for extended periods. The other issue is the biocompatibility problem. I tried to improve the formulation of the hydrogel, to make it as ‘invisible’ to the immune system as possible, by getting it to mimick the natural tear film ( specifically Mucins, which are the key here ) Again, although I achieved some real improvements, the problem of protien build up, still remained, to an extent. Getting the physical designs right, was relative child’s play in comparison. The one thing that was achieved / improved, most markedly ( and this was 18 years ago ), was the robustness / durability / handleability, of the lenses, so risk of splitting / fragmentation, was vastly reduced. So in summary then, where possible, go for daily disposables, over extended wear, in my opinion, they are a far better option.

    Good insight, thanks. Unfortunately the dailies didn't work out for my prescription.

    Ah, yes, some of the more ‘extreme’ prescriptions are more difficult to cater for.
  • doogandoogan Posts: 30
    Bit of an update. I tried again today with much better results. The contacts weren't moving around at all and for probably 2/3rds of the 60km ride my vision was pretty good. There were moments when my left eye seemed to go a bit blurry but after an adjustment and a few mins break it seemed ok again. I could read my wahoo element fine.

    One thing I've noticed is that the photochromic lens definitely makes my long distance vision a bit blurry anyway.

    I think it's now a case of me getting more used to the contact lenses (hopefully the vision and positioning of the lenses should improve with time) and possible experiment with different lenses on the jawbreaker.
  • milemuncher1milemuncher1 Posts: 1,472
    doogan wrote:
    Bit of an update. I tried again today with much better results. The contacts weren't moving around at all and for probably 2/3rds of the 60km ride my vision was pretty good. There were moments when my left eye seemed to go a bit blurry but after an adjustment and a few mins break it seemed ok again. I could read my wahoo element fine.

    One thing I've noticed is that the photochromic lens definitely makes my long distance vision a bit blurry anyway.

    I think it's now a case of me getting more used to the contact lenses (hopefully the vision and positioning of the lenses should improve with time) and possible experiment with different lenses on the jawbreaker.

    The issue with the Toric lenses, is that there is a cylinder cut on the inside surface, and a sphere cut on the outside surface. The sphere and cylinder are at a set angle to each other. With a contact lens, this means that maintenance of position is crucial, or the lens doesn’t work as intended. It’s good to hear real world experience, in a sporting environment, as this was never originally a consideration in the design.
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