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Question for those that work somewhere with a dress code and no a/c

prhymeateprhymeate Posts: 791
edited April 2018 in The bottom bracket
How do you stay cool in the summer?

I've never worked anywhere with a dress code (and could go on a long rant about how I don't agree with them), as soon as the summer comes around it's shorts and t-shirt time. I went for an interview somewhere yesterday that has your usual shirt/trousers dress code and it was like sitting in a sauna. No a/c, no open windows, fans blowing hot air. It sounds melodramatic, but as someone who runs hot, the idea of trying to work in those conditions is actually making me think twice about taking the job if offered.

I know natural fabrics are good but are there any specific brands that people would recommend?

Posts

  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,008
    Tell it to the interviewer and see what he says.

    Short sleeved shirts? Linen trousers? Sandals instead of shoes.

    Where's this hot weather anyway?
  • prhymeateprhymeate Posts: 791
    Tell it to the interviewer and see what he says.

    Short sleeved shirts? Linen trousers? Sandals instead of shoes.

    Where's this hot weather anyway?


    I might mention it next week. I'm not sure if I can bring myself to wear linen trousers and sandals to work...but it's an option I guess. Part of the role would involve cycling around from place to place too, f doing that in trousers and shirt in the middle of summer.

    The few days of Summer have come early in London.
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,008
    Perfect week to be seconded to our Glasgow office. Typical.

    Maybe wear those cargo trousers with zip off legs to turn them into shorts?
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    Tell it to the interviewer and see what he says.

    Short sleeved shirts? Linen trousers? Sandals instead of shoes.

    Where's this hot weather anyway?


    sandals. yes. a great way of making yourself both popular and attractive.
    in the winter just put socks on to keep warm.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • poptart242poptart242 Posts: 465
    Raise it to the interviewer. Frankly if you're in a law firm or bank, you're not going to get far. You could get a personal A/C unit for your desk (or just a fan).

    If you could get away with a smart merino polo or similar that would be a good way to go? Hate to say it, but Rapha are pretty good there. I've also bought blazers and suits from overseas when on holiday as they're made for that climate and are thinner. Zara isn't bad, you can order their range online.

    Luckily I'm out of the legal industry and work in a company with mostly creative types, so even in jeans and an oxford shirt I'm the most formal one most days. I feel your pain!
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    Our dress code is no board shorts and flops.

    Unless it's really hot.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • prhymeateprhymeate Posts: 791
    poptart242 wrote:
    Raise it to the interviewer. Frankly if you're in a law firm or bank, you're not going to get far. You could get a personal A/C unit for your desk (or just a fan).

    If you could get away with a smart merino polo or similar that would be a good way to go? Hate to say it, but Rapha are pretty good there. I've also bought blazers and suits from overseas when on holiday as they're made for that climate and are thinner. Zara isn't bad, you can order their range online.

    Luckily I'm out of the legal industry and work in a company with mostly creative types, so even in jeans and an oxford shirt I'm the most formal one most days. I feel your pain!

    Maybe I'll ask about it at the second interview. I just wasn't sure if they'd look at me with a puzzled look. It's not law or banking related and the job title even has the word cycling in it so you'd hope there would be a little leniency.

    I did take a look at the Rapha selection...it does look good, but £85 for a short sleeve shirt...I should have stocked up when I had the 40% discount through my old workplace :( I have spotted some Airism polo shirts from Uniqlo for £15 so might go and check those out.
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 22,325 Lives Here
    cooldad wrote:
    Our dress code is no board shorts and flops.
    Unless it's really hot.
    There are people in board shorts in the offices here today, most of them aren't customer facing though. Oh, and we have air conditioning.
    Back to the OP, I got some very lightweight walking trousers, Craghopper I think, that have zip off lowers. The wife picked them up cheap in TK Maxx I think. Quite comfortable and not sweaty, something like that might be worth a go.
  • thistle_(mbnw)thistle_(mbnw) Posts: 3,264
    Apparently we have a dress code that says shorts are OK as long as they are tailored shorts, which was amusing when someone tried it.

    Thin trousers and short sleeve cotton shirt here, although we have AC (which is working properly today). Some shirts have a plasticky feel to them, they are no good when it's warm even if short sleeved.
  • hopkinbhopkinb Posts: 5,462
    I have literally never been in a work environment where I have thought, oh, I wish I was wearing shorts. I wear shorts on the bike or doing other physical exercise, or by the pool on holiday/messing about in the garden at home. Otherwise my legs are covered. I get the p!ss taken out of me mercilessly for this, but to me, a middle-aged man in shorts looks faintly ridiculous, and again from a personal point of view, I am comfortable in long trousers, even on the hottest days in this country. 8)
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    veronese68 wrote:
    cooldad wrote:
    Our dress code is no board shorts and flops.
    Unless it's really hot.
    There are people in board shorts in the offices here today, most of them aren't customer facing though. Oh, and we have air conditioning.
    Back to the OP, I got some very lightweight walking trousers, Craghopper I think, that have zip off lowers. The wife picked them up cheap in TK Maxx I think. Quite comfortable and not sweaty, something like that might be worth a go.
    I work in an office, in an industry where most companies have a suit and tie dress code.

    Just seems silly in the 21st century. I do dress up when I go and see clients - I make sure I'm wearing clean jeans. Sometimes I even wear a polo shirt instead of a T shirt.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,187
    My office is pretty relaxed but nobody would think to wear shorts. We do have 'flexible' working so you can Work from Home as I am today, in shorts.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,476
    hopkinb wrote:
    a middle-aged man in shorts looks faintly ridiculous, and again from a personal point of view, I am comfortable in long trousers, even on the hottest days in this country. 8)
    When I get to middle-age I might share your view ... :lol:

    <in denial mode off>

    Not sure shorts at work are viable for me, we've got aircon anyway so never _that_ bad.
    But I do wear shorts when it's warm enough - I put them on after my commute home last night (boy that was warm!)
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 39,633
    Work from home and wear WTF you want...
    Whippet
    Bruiser
    Panzer
    Commuter

    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • prhymeateprhymeate Posts: 791
    veronese68 wrote:
    Back to the OP, I got some very lightweight walking trousers, Craghopper I think, that have zip off lowers. The wife picked them up cheap in TK Maxx I think. Quite comfortable and not sweaty, something like that might be worth a go.

    Cheers, might check them out. I could just zip them off when at my desk and back on again when I have to walk anywhere, perfect. :D

    hopkinb wrote:
    I have literally never been in a work environment where I have thought, oh, I wish I was wearing shorts. I wear shorts on the bike or doing other physical exercise, or by the pool on holiday/messing about in the garden at home. Otherwise my legs are covered. I get the p!ss taken out of me mercilessly for this, but to me, a middle-aged man in shorts looks faintly ridiculous, and again from a personal point of view, I am comfortable in long trousers, even on the hottest days in this country. 8)

    I wish I felt that comfortable, I don't know how people do it. I'm pretty much in shorts from May to October.
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Work from home and wear WTF you want...

    That's the ultimate solution. Although to be fair I've freelanced from home for a few years and with no a/c in the house, it can still get pretty hot when the computer is working at full steam. I should probably look into rigging up some type of paddling pool desk, what could go wrong.
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 39,633
    prhymeate wrote:
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Work from home and wear WTF you want...

    That's the ultimate solution. Although to be fair I've freelanced from home for a few years and with no a/c in the house, it can still get pretty hot when the computer is working at full steam. I should probably look into rigging up some type of paddling pool desk, what could go wrong.
    Two ways that work for me - make sure the Wi-fi range covers the patio & garden and buy a big sunshade. Or work in a North facing room like I did yesterday.
    Whippet
    Bruiser
    Panzer
    Commuter

    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • tlw1tlw1 Posts: 18,075
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    prhymeate wrote:
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Work from home and wear WTF you want...

    That's the ultimate solution. Although to be fair I've freelanced from home for a few years and with no a/c in the house, it can still get pretty hot when the computer is working at full steam. I should probably look into rigging up some type of paddling pool desk, what could go wrong.
    Two ways that work for me - make sure the Wi-fi range covers the patio & garden and buy a big sunshade. Or work in a North facing room like I did yesterday.
    Buy a Wi-Fi extender - lounge if hot (that side is sandstone so never really warms up) if cold the kitchen, brick, lots of Windows and an aga
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 39,633
    tlw1 wrote:
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    prhymeate wrote:
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Work from home and wear WTF you want...

    That's the ultimate solution. Although to be fair I've freelanced from home for a few years and with no a/c in the house, it can still get pretty hot when the computer is working at full steam. I should probably look into rigging up some type of paddling pool desk, what could go wrong.
    Two ways that work for me - make sure the Wi-fi range covers the patio & garden and buy a big sunshade. Or work in a North facing room like I did yesterday.
    Buy a Wi-Fi extender - lounge if hot (that side is sandstone so never really warms up) if cold the kitchen, brick, lots of Windows and an aga
    Mines good for half way down the garden so no problem :)
    Whippet
    Bruiser
    Panzer
    Commuter

    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • tlw1tlw1 Posts: 18,075
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    tlw1 wrote:
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    prhymeate wrote:
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Work from home and wear WTF you want...

    That's the ultimate solution. Although to be fair I've freelanced from home for a few years and with no a/c in the house, it can still get pretty hot when the computer is working at full steam. I should probably look into rigging up some type of paddling pool desk, what could go wrong.
    Two ways that work for me - make sure the Wi-fi range covers the patio & garden and buy a big sunshade. Or work in a North facing room like I did yesterday.
    Buy a Wi-Fi extender - lounge if hot (that side is sandstone so never really warms up) if cold the kitchen, brick, lots of Windows and an aga
    Mines good for half way down the garden so no problem :)
    Mines shoot and doesn’t cover the house
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    I work in IT so my wireless coverage at home is excellent.

    Unfortunately I'm expected to wear shirt and trousers all the time, despite my job involving working in overheating switch rooms, crawling under and round the back of desks, going up ladders, moving heavy things about etc.

    As an added bonus I get to enforce the dress code I disagree with to my underlings.
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 39,633
    timothyw wrote:
    I work in IT so my wireless coverage at home is excellent.

    Unfortunately I'm expected to wear shirt and trousers all the time, despite my job involving working in overheating switch rooms, crawling under and round the back of desks, going up ladders, moving heavy things about etc.

    As an added bonus I get to enforce the dress code I disagree with to my underlings.
    If you can enforce dress code then you should enforce the stuff you mentioned you have to do in your second paragraph to your minions as well :)
    Whippet
    Bruiser
    Panzer
    Commuter

    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    That's pretty much what I do, to be fair.
  • floreriderflorerider Posts: 1,053
    Probably belongs in the Saudi thread,,but try working where dress code is flame proof overalls (they don't breathe), hard hats and gloves in temperatures in excess of 40 Celsius ambient, full sun, oh and the heat of the oil facilities pushing the localised temps to the working environment to over 60.

    Makes a suited and booted summers day in London a pleasure.
  • tlw1tlw1 Posts: 18,075
    florerider wrote:
    Probably belongs in the Saudi thread,,but try working where dress code is flame proof overalls (they don't breathe), hard hats and gloves in temperatures in excess of 40 Celsius ambient, full sun, oh and the heat of the oil facilities pushing the localised temps to the working environment to over 60.

    Makes a suited and booted summers day in London a pleasure.
    Change jobs then
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,534
    prhymeate wrote:
    I've freelanced from home for a few years and with no a/c in the house, it can still get pretty hot when the computer is working at full steam. I should probably look into rigging up some type of paddling pool desk, what could go wrong.


    Adult-inflatable-bathtub-thickening-folding-tub-bath-bucket-child-plastic-bathtub-paddling-pool.jpg_640x640.jpg

    or

    man-in-office-with-feet-in-paddling-pool-B0GCY8.jpg
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    timothyw wrote:
    I work in IT so my wireless coverage at home is excellent.

    Unfortunately I'm expected to wear shirt and trousers all the time, despite my job involving working in overheating switch rooms, crawling under and round the back of desks, going up ladders, moving heavy things about etc.


    sounds hellish. how do you cope?
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
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