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Front and Rear Tyre Combo?

CharlieV453CharlieV453 Posts: 100
edited March 2018 in MTB buying advice
Hi. My tyres have worn down over the past few months and will need replacing soon (my rear one will go first). I'm on a budget and would like a set of cheap, grippy and relatively hard-wearing tyres in 2.3 or 2.4 for about 60 pounds or less. Also I currently run aggressive enduro/dh tyres all year round.

Thanks

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    Depends what you ride, where, etc. Wheels size?

    Why would you use mud tyres all year round? Or DH tyres unless you do gnarly DH stuff?
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  • CharlieV453CharlieV453 Posts: 100
    Sorry. I should have said. 27.5 x2.3 or 2.4. Ride lots of mud and loam and love the feel, grip and support of the mud tyres.
  • slc123slc123 Posts: 407
    I am not entirely sure why you would want mud tyres all year round especially when it's dry. Just going to make things slower and more difficult.

    On my XC bike I run a set of Maxxis Ardents and use them all year round even on extremely muddy, snowy and general censored conditions. Find those fine.

    The trail bike has a Minion DHF on the front and a High Roller II on the back. Much grippier than the Ardents in all conditions.
    Cannondale Trail 27.5 | 2015
    Titus El Chulo 27.5 | 2017
    Trek Slash 9 27.5 | 2015 (building)
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,756
    That’s not a mud tyre size! Do you mean a mud tyre or just an off road tyre? What make and model of tyre do you have on now?
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    Specialized Purgatory or Butcher, £20-£30 each
  • CharlieV453CharlieV453 Posts: 100
    JGTR wrote:
    Specialized Purgatory or Butcher, £20-£30 each
    Ok. Thanks
  • CharlieV453CharlieV453 Posts: 100
    The Rookie wrote:
    That’s not a mud tyre size! Do you mean a mud tyre or just an off road tyre? What make and model of tyre do you have on now?
    Really? MBR says it is I'm pretty sure. 2.3 to 2.5 width with deep blocky tread patterns. Currently i am running Magic Mary in 2.4 and a vigilante in 2.3 to bridge from my old black shark and baron combo to a new set.
  • CharlieV453CharlieV453 Posts: 100
    slc123 wrote:
    I am not entirely sure why you would want mud tyres all year round especially when it's dry. Just going to make things slower and more difficult.

    On my XC bike I run a set of Maxxis Ardents and use them all year round even on extremely muddy, snowy and general censored conditions. Find those fine.

    The trail bike has a Minion DHF on the front and a High Roller II on the back. Much grippier than the Ardents in all conditions.
    Yeah, ok. Fair point. I'm not going to rule out mud tyres but what else would you recommend then?
  • JBAJBA Posts: 2,820
    Mud tyres tend to be narrower so they can dig through the mud rather than floating on it, typically 1.8 - 2.1”.

    Spesh Butcher (F), Purgatory (R) or Purgatory (F), Ground Control (R) are pretty good all-round combinations. Make sure you get Control or Grid casings though.

    Another decent tyre is the Schwalbe Nobby Nic in Evo flavour. I run them on my trail bike with a 2.35” Trail Star on the front and 2.25” Pace Star on the rear. Both are Snakeskin for a bit of added toughness.
    “Life has been unfaithful
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    Giant Trance 2 27.5 2016 ¦ Sonder Broken Road 2021¦ Giant Revolt Advanced 2 2019 ¦ Giant Toughtroad SLR 1 2019 ¦ Giant Anthem 3 2015 ¦ Specialized Myka Comp FSR 2009
  • 02gf7402gf74 Posts: 1,166
    JBA wrote:
    Mud tyres tend to be narrower so they can dig through the mud rather than floating on it, typically 1.8 - 2.1”.

    .

    I subscribe to that view, see my post earlier about large block mud tyres, I ended up with a pair of Continental tyres, forget name, but in 26 in. Not available in 29 but may be in 27.5
  • CharlieV453CharlieV453 Posts: 100
    Ah. Ok. Not sure why but the post was talking about 2.3's and 2.4's. Anyway. Thanks for expanding my knowledge on that. I always thought it was the 2.3 to 2.5 that was mud tyre territory but now i know. Ok. So mud tyres arent what i thought they were so will rule them out. Thanks for that. So am looking for some aggressive trail/enduro tyres about 2.35. Sorey about the mistake!
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    More important than the make is the tread compound. Cheaper tyres tend to have harder compounds, more expensive better, softer, and often multiple compounds on the edges and centre of the tyre, for better grip leaning, and longer life upright.

    So aim for folding bead (which tend to be the better tyres in a range), with soft rubber. Maxxis would be Exception compound, Continental - Black Chilli. Etc.
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    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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