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Speedplay rebuild

markwb79markwb79 Posts: 932
edited February 2018 in Workshop
Hi,

I have heard that you can rebuild speedplay pedals.

I have seen the spindles for sale as a generic product.

Are the bearings also a standard product, or only available as the official Speedplay version?

Or are there affordable rebuild kits available?
Anyone have any experience on these?

Cheers
Mark
Scott Addict 2011
Giant TCR 2012

Posts

  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    Careful, you might have Richard Bryne after you ;)

    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/genera ... 38641.html
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • sungodsungod Posts: 13,774
    bearings are standard, bit of searching and you'll find the spec.

    unless you skimp on the greasing or are unlucky, the bearings last a few years, spindles last much longer (caveat, i've got one ti set, one stainless, i hear the cromoly ones can rust), the bowties should also last years

    i've got them on both bikes, ride year round in all weathers, very reliable pedals

    the needle bearings are pressed in but you can get them out, for the others the key point is they need to be shielded not sealed as seals will prevent grease injection

    if you search with google you'll find bearing spec, i got a batch years ago but haven't kept details

    i dug up this thread, might help... http://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum ... hp?t=81464
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • markwb79markwb79 Posts: 932
    sungod wrote:
    bearings are standard, bit of searching and you'll find the spec.

    unless you skimp on the greasing or are unlucky, the bearings last a few years, spindles last much longer (caveat, i've got one ti set, one stainless, i hear the cromoly ones can rust), the bowties should also last years

    i've got them on both bikes, ride year round in all weathers, very reliable pedals

    the needle bearings are pressed in but you can get them out, for the others the key point is they need to be shielded not sealed as seals will prevent grease injection

    if you search with google you'll find bearing spec, i got a batch years ago but haven't kept details

    i dug up this thread, might help... http://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum ... hp?t=81464


    Fantastic reply, really appreciate it.

    I do love them, but over the years I have had 2 pedals seize, due to my poor maintance scheduling and the Netherlands abundance of sand that likes to get into every bearing on a bike.

    I bought some second hand ones a while back, I am greasing them regularly. But I thought after winter I might give them a good service and replace for spindle for the lighter weight one. Plus the silver ones just look better.

    I have them on 3 different bikes, so maybe just strip them down and give them a service and see how that goes. I don't like the sound of having to press on bearings.
    Scott Addict 2011
    Giant TCR 2012
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 2,100
    In my experience it is the bow ties that wear out first as long as you grease them periodically. I have never replaced a bearing in three sets that I have and they all run smooth as silk still.

    Depending on where you are you can buy titanium spindles fairly cheaply, just be careful with the Chinese ones. I bought mine from Dulight in France and they are real quality. I also buy bow ties from them and again they are high quality. I did try a set of the Chinese bow ties and one didn’t have a countersunk screw head machined in and all the supplied bolts were undersize and would not tighten up, so I returned them for a refund and stick with Dulight now.

    http://www.dulight.fr/en/road/240-speedplay-zero-titanium-spindles-standard.html

    And

    http://www.dulight.fr/en/road/471-titanium-plates-for-speedplay.html

    They do Speedplay bits as well;

    http://www.dulight.fr/en/51_speedplay

    I have this info which may be of help;

    Speedplay rebuild instructions and bearings

    2 each – HK1010 Needle Bearings. Measurements: OD=14mm BORE=10mm WIDTH=10mm.

    2 each – Bearing 136 also known as 686z, 686zz, 686 z, 686 zz. Measurements: OD=13mm BORE=6mm WIDTH=5mm

    2 each – Bearing 137 also known as 137z, 137zz, mr137, mr137z, mr137zz, mr 137, mr 137 z, mr 137 zz. Measurements: OD=13mm BORE=7mm WIDTH =4mm

    2 each – Inner Retaining Ring BORE=1/2″ WIDTH=0.03″

    2 each – Rubber O-Ring. ID=5/16″ OD=7/16″ WIDTH=1/16″

    All of these are readily available online – Amazon or eBay. Bearings come in 10 packs for about $9.00 each, the retainer clips and o-rings are pennies each. For under $30.00 you can get enough to rebuild 10 pedals! These bearings listed are for X1 & X2, Zero Ti, Stainless & Chromoly and Light Action Ti & Stainless.


    How to Service Your Speedplay Pedals:

    The needle bearings on all models of Speedplay road bike pedals are NOT fused or glued in any way and are very easy to change out. Instructions below.

    The only differences between the X1 and X2 are spindle material and body color. You can rebuild your X1’s with X2 bodies with NO problems. They are the exact same except for color. No need to spend $100+ to rebuild your pedals.

    I have measured the internals of all of the models listed below using a micrometer and found that they are all identical and cross-compatible. The bodies, cleats and bowties are different, but inside they are all the same.

    X1 & X2.
    Zero Ti, Stainless & Chromoly.
    Light Action Ti & Stainless

    You can interchange bodies and spindles between all pedals listed above. Note: Ti spindles are 2mm shorter. You can use Ward Ti spindles on any of the models listed above.

    X5 (aka X3) and Light Action Chromoly are completely different inside and not compatible with the other pedals listed above.

    To do a full rebuild requires the following items which can be found at any bearing/hardware supply company:

    2 each - HK1010 Needle Bearings. Measurements: OD=14mm BORE=10mm WIDTH=10mm.

    2 each - Bearing 136 also known as 686z, 686zz, 686 z, 686 zz. Measurements: OD=13mm BORE=6mm WIDTH=5mm

    2 each - Bearing 137 also known as 137z, 137zz, mr137, mr137z, mr137zz, mr 137, mr 137 z, mr 137 zz. Measurements: OD=13mm BORE=7mm WIDTH =4mm

    2 each - Inner Retaining Ring BORE=1/2" WIDTH=0.03"

    2 each - Rubber O-Ring. ID=5/16" OD=7/16" WIDTH=1/16"

    For those of you wanting to lighten up your pedals with aluminum or titanium screws the screw size is:

    Bowtie Screws - M4 x 0.7 x 17mm recessed flat head in Stainless Steel. 17mm is the total length of the screw top-to-bottom. 16mm is much easier to find and there should be no problems using the shorter screws for this application. Some flat head screws have a head that is too tall and can protrude from the top of the bowtie. Make sure you get low head screws.

    Spindle Screws - M4 x 0.7 x 8mm button head in Furnace Black Steel. 8mm is the length of the threads below the head.

    To replace the bearings unscrew the grease port screw. Using a pick pry off the dust cap. Older pedals will not have the grease port or port screw. Next, remove the spindle screw by using a torx bit or allen wrench (depending on the type of screw) and either a 6mm or 8mm Hex in the Spindle or a 15mm wrench on the Spindle flats (depending on your spindle type).

    If, at this point, the screw is stuck do not overtorque it or you will risk stripping out the head. The loctite is seizing the screw. Disclaimer: The following method is not approved by Speedplay and any carelessness can result in injury. You will need to heat the screw to melt the loctite. To do so get a hex bit screw driver and hex bit with the proper torx or allen head for the screw. A hex bit is a small bit the that slides into a quick-change screw driver. Do a Google search for 'hex bit if you don't know or go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Torx_drivers.jpg Place just the hex bit into the screw holding the pedal with the screw straight up. Now with a blow torch or good heat gun heat up the end of the bit (furthest point away from the pedal)until it is red hot making sure you do not heat the pedal body. Wait for about 30 seconds to allow the heat from the bit to transfer into the screw melting the loctite. Then slide the hex bit screw driver onto the bit and unscrew. If heated thoroughly the screw will unscrew with minimal effort.

    With the screw removed you can now slide the entire body assembly off. The old o-ring should be on the spindle. Remove and discard. Wipe the spindle clean and set aside. Using a retaining ring tool compress the ring and pull straight out. Now using a punch or screw driver carefully tap out the 2 bearings. Discard the old retaining ring and bearings.

    Flip the pedal body around to the side with the needle bearing. On the outside lip of the bearing is a thin wire retaining ring. Most all early models do not have this retaining ring. If your dust cap does not have a grease port screw, it probably does not have the retaining ring. Take a pick and pry up one side of the retaining ring. Then with a pair of pliers pull it out. If it is damaged don't worry. You can usually bend it back and tap it in. If not it is not a 'necessary' piece and you can use your pedals without it. No problem. Flip the pedal over and you will see 2 slots behind the needle bearing. Take a small flat blade screw driver and insert into one of the slots and tap with a rubber mallet. The needle bearing will pop right off. Note that the old bearing will now be damaged and is not re-useable. Wipe the inside clean.

    To reassemble first place the new o-ring onto the spindle about 1/3 of the way. Now take the new needle bearing and slide it in as far as you can by hand. Make sure the lettering is on the outside as each side is slightly different. Then carefully tap it with a rubber mallet until it is flush with the pedal body. Take the old needle bearing and place it on the new bearing and tap with a rubber mallet until it is completely seated. Discard the old needle bearing. Take the metal retaining ring and tap it into the slot. Now take the pedal body and slide in the 2 bearings making sure you slide in the thinner bearing first. Make sure the bearings are seated all the way in before installing the retaining ring. The ring should clip into the groove in the pedal body. Take the body assembly and slide it back onto the spindle making sure the o-ring seats properly. Take the spindle screw and dab a little blue loctite onto the threads and screw it in. Do not use green or red loctite as you will not be able to remove the screw in the future. Tighten to 3.5nm torque which is equal to 30in/lb or 2.5ft/lb. Install the dust cap and grease the pedal with a grease gun. Screw in the grease port screw and you're done!! The pedals will feel slightly stiff to start with but will loosen up after a few miles. New or freshly greased pedals may leak grease for the first few rides which is completely normal.
  • trekvettrekvet Posts: 220
    Years ago Speedplay did rebuild kits, perhaps they still do. LBS ordered mine, but when I went to collect couldn't be found, so they robbed out some new pedals, so got lots bits.
    The Wife complained for months about the empty pot of bike oil on the hall stand; so I replaced it with a full one.
  • crankycrankcrankycrank Posts: 1,830
    ^^^Speedplay do sell rebuild kits....at premium prices and parts (as mentioned in posts above) such as bearings and seals are just standard sizes which can be bought at a fraction of the cost. Same with their lubricants and "special" grease gun.
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