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Fork squelch and crank questions from a newbie

Diesel73Diesel73 Posts: 14
edited February 2018 in MTB workshop & tech
Hi all

Not a newbie to the MTB world but a newbie to anything more complicated than replacing tyres. I have relied on a mates expertise for years but thought it about time I started doing the maintenance myself....plus he has taken a job in NZ :wink:

I have a few issues that I'd like to ask your advice on:

1. I have a set of Rockshox Revelation 426 (2009 model i believe) which have just began to make some rather loud squelching and bubbling noises under load. Not keen on servicing them myself until I have an idea on what the issue is....and even then not really that confident!

2. I recently spent 4 weeks working in China. On return I found my son had moved the exhaust for the tumble dryer in the garage and pointed it directly at the BB. Bike was covered in moisture and had been for at least as long as I'd been away. First ride I noticed a grinding noise coming from the BB every time I put pressure on the left crank arm. Question is could the moisture have affected the BB and if so is it a case of drying out or a complete replacement/refurb/service?

3. I currently have a Truvativ triple crank (3 x 9) and I'm wondering if it would be possible to remove the small and large ring and reduce down to 1 x 9. Would it be worth it? Not sure if the cassette would give me a decent range to make it worthwhile.
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FYI. Bike is a 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT2 and yes, i really should clean it and the garage a bit more :)

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Squelch noises from the fork as oil goes through the damper are not at all unusual, simples check is to remove the compression damper and make sure you have enough oil in there, it should come up past the base of the compression by about 10mm (as a rough guide) and you can tel that using a simple dipstick.

    May or may not need a new BB GXP aren’t the hardiest, or it could be something else, as simple strip and smear with greats and reassemble may fix it.

    I rode 1x9 using just a narrow wide ring for about 4 years on a conventional cassette, but you can get wide range 9 speed for not too much.
  • 02GF7402GF74 Posts: 1,294
    The Rookie wrote:

    I rode 1x9 using just a narrow wide ring for about 4 years on a conventional cassette, but you can get wide range 9 speed for not too much.


    9sp cassette is likely to be 11-34 or 1-32 so if you intend to cycle up hills, then you will struggle.

    I'm about to go try 1x9 and have 11-40 cassette on order from China, £17,im sure you could get it cheaper on your next visit.

    With the increased in largest sprocket size., you will need a hanger extender.

    Changing to narrow wide chainring is advised, see my topic on 9x1 conversion.
  • 02GF7402GF74 Posts: 1,294
    Diesel73 wrote:
    3. small and large ring and reduce down to 1 x 9. Would it be worth it? .

    Yes. You ditch the front mech that is a magnet for mud and save weight and simplicity by not having front shifter and cable.
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