Water softeners

rick_chasey
rick_chasey Posts: 72,615
edited February 2018 in The cake stop
Anyone have one installed?

Anything worth knowing before I get one?

Comments

  • cooldad
    cooldad Posts: 32,599
    MTFU. Soft water is for girls and poodles.
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  • orraloon
    orraloon Posts: 12,675
    :D

    Anyway, to the question. Yes, installed one as part of house renovations. Monarch Midi. All good, does what is supposed to. Coming up to 5 years now, no issues.

    Wickes have a 3 for 2 on Hydrosoft salt tablets just now, works out as £10 per 25kg bag.
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,638
    edited February 2018
    What sort of money are you planning to spend?

    There are products to fit most budgets but as with most things you get what you pay for. I've had a number of different plumbers recommend Kinetico which are a bit more pricey to buy but don't need an electrical connection.
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  • cooldad wrote:
    MTFU. Soft water is for girls and poodles.

    Also good at not f@cking up washing machines, dish washers, kettles, coffee machines, irons.
  • tlw1
    tlw1 Posts: 21,863
    Just taken one out........ got bored of filling the thing and the sound of it

    Must put it on eBay
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,615
    rjsterry wrote:
    What sort of money are you planning to spend?

    There are products to fit most budgets but as with most things you get what you pay for. I've had a number of different plumbers recommend Kinetico which are a bit more pricey to buy but don't need an electrical connection.

    That was the one I was looking at.

    at £800 it was more expensive than I was expecting ( for the cheap one), but not earth shattering.

    The challenge there is working out where the water comes in; if it's somewhere inconvenient, it's not gonna work.
  • bianchimoon
    bianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    what are these things, marketed as electronic water softeners, any body got any experience of them?
    http://www.eddy.uk.com/AW-Water-Softene ... gKb6fD_BwE

    EDIT: IGNORE:, i just read their FAQ's, just came up in a google search for softeners
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • rjsterry wrote:
    What sort of money are you planning to spend?

    There are products to fit most budgets but as with most things you get what you pay for. I've had a number of different plumbers recommend Kinetico which are a bit more pricey to buy but don't need an electrical connection.

    That was the one I was looking at.

    at £800 it was more expensive than I was expecting ( for the cheap one), but not earth shattering.

    The challenge there is working out where the water comes in; if it's somewhere inconvenient, it's not gonna work.

    what are the ongoing running costs?
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,615
    rjsterry wrote:
    What sort of money are you planning to spend?

    There are products to fit most budgets but as with most things you get what you pay for. I've had a number of different plumbers recommend Kinetico which are a bit more pricey to buy but don't need an electrical connection.

    That was the one I was looking at.

    at £800 it was more expensive than I was expecting ( for the cheap one), but not earth shattering.

    The challenge there is working out where the water comes in; if it's somewhere inconvenient, it's not gonna work.

    what are the ongoing running costs?

    £50 a year.
  • rjsterry wrote:
    What sort of money are you planning to spend?

    There are products to fit most budgets but as with most things you get what you pay for. I've had a number of different plumbers recommend Kinetico which are a bit more pricey to buy but don't need an electrical connection.

    That was the one I was looking at.

    at £800 it was more expensive than I was expecting ( for the cheap one), but not earth shattering.

    The challenge there is working out where the water comes in; if it's somewhere inconvenient, it's not gonna work.

    what are the ongoing running costs?

    £50 a year.

    that is not so bad - it is something I have been meaning to get around to
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,615
    I was more hoping it'd be £300-400 installation rather than 800, if i'm honest.
  • I was more hoping it'd be £300-400 installation rather than 800, if i'm honest.

    it is one of those things that you get what you pay for - I was more concerned with ongoing running costs and amount of faffing
  • Mad_Malx
    Mad_Malx Posts: 5,002
    Definitely go for non-electric flow metered. Easier installation, more economical and don't flush at stupid times waking you up (although you can set the time 12h out so they flush while you are out, rather than at 4am.
    I'm amazed that they cost so much to fit, although depends on your existing plumbing. I'm cack-handed and managed to fit one in a morning.
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674
    More economical to move to Scotland ;-)
  • bbrap
    bbrap Posts: 610
    We are on our second Kinetico (1st one lasted over 20 years until the insides which holds the filter medium let go and sent it through the plumbing and out of the taps, could have repaired it fairly cheaply but it was looking its age).

    Plumbing in is quite easy, just cut into the cold feed in two places about a foot apart, put two tees in the run and put a shut off valve between them where the original pipe ran, another two shut off valves on the tees. This allows you to either divert through the softener (normal mode, bypass shut other two valves open), or bypass the softener completely (T valves shut, bypass open, eg for maintenance). You may want to run a hard water take off (for drinking, kettle filling etc) prior to the softener.

    The Kineticos use a graduated rotor which is matched to the hardness of the water in your area (find out from your local water supplier website) so you will need to get the correct one. This makes sure that it regenerates appropriately for the hardness and does not waste salt regenerating when not needed. We are in a very hard water area (even worse than London) and use a 25Kg bag of salt every six or seven weeks.

    Every year I bypass the softener and take the thing apart for a good flush out of the salt box (even the best quality salt contains all sorts of crud which builds up as a fine sludge in the bottom and needs cleaning out).

    Plumbing bits will not cost more than £20, can't see how a local plumber would charge more than £40 or £50 to do what is a 30 minute job (assuming your pipework is not embedded in concrete or hidden somewhere you can't get to)

    Hope that helps.
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  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,615
    Thanks that's really helpful.

    Can you remember what the actual Kinetico costs if they don't fit if for you?
  • bbrap
    bbrap Posts: 610
    Thanks that's really helpful.

    Can you remember what the actual Kinetico costs if they don't fit if for you?

    I paid about £600 brand new and delivered and that was 3 years ago. Just looked on ebay and they now go for £650 ish new or between £250 - £400 for a refurbished one. Given that Kineticos are twin cylinder and regenerate alternately using pre softened water I would think that a refurb would be just as good as a brand new one. All the insides are either a plastic/nylon type material or some sort of stainless. My first Kinetico was the older style that had a couple of bits which rusted a bit but they changed that design years ago (the old one had a cream coloured angular case, the newer ones are more rounded and grey/silvery colours).
    Rose Xeon CDX 3100, Ultegra Di2 disc (nice weather)
    Ribble Gran Fondo, Campagnolo Centaur (winter bike)
    Van Raam 'O' Pair
    Land Rover (really nasty weather :lol: )