Forum home Road cycling forum The cake stop

Nebulizers to aid breathing...

bartman100bartman100 Posts: 544
edited December 2017 in The cake stop
As an asthmatic, I'm always looking for new ways to relax and relieve bronchospasm - supplementary to the usual salbutamol and beclometasone inhalers of course.

I've always loved steam rooms (not so much saunas) and want some kind of home device to try and recreate the experience - preferably one that can administer medication at the same time (or at least menthol / eucalyptus oil).

I'm on the list for a CPAP machine already so this will help with sleep but want something to aid relaxed breathing in the evening (I'd like a pipe but I don't think the doc would approve).

Any experiences/advice appreciated.

Posts

  • Boiling water in a bowl then tea towel over head over bowl
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 16,924
    Difficult to create the atmosphere of a steam room in the comfort of your living room without completely ruining your living room. Also excessive humidity will encourage mould growth (especially at this time of year when there are a lot of cold surfaces for vapour to condense on) which is pretty bad for anyone with asthma. You can get 'steamroom' shower cubicles.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    1980s BSA 10sp

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • Boiling water in a bowl then tea towel over head over bowl
    yeah but that's boring
  • rjsterry wrote:
    Difficult to create the atmosphere of a steam room in the comfort of your living room without completely ruining your living room. Also excessive humidity will encourage mould growth (especially at this time of year when there are a lot of cold surfaces for vapour to condense on) which is pretty bad for anyone with asthma. You can get 'steamroom' shower cubicles.
    fair points. I think snuff might be the answer
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 16,924
    That said, if the RH (relative humidity) in your house is low (not unusual if it's well heated and over ventilated) you can get plug in humidifiers to get the RH back up to around the 50% optimum.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    1980s BSA 10sp

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • Zendog1Zendog1 Posts: 816
    I now breath through a hole in my neck - regular nebs essential.

    This is the one I normally use (don't get the Medix version its now discontinued)
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Omron-MicroAIR ... NS1808PXZN

    I have a traditional vibrating one from the NHS for backup but they are VERY NOISY. Not good for a quiet evening sit.
  • mouthmouth Posts: 1,196
    bartman100 wrote:
    rjsterry wrote:
    Difficult to create the atmosphere of a steam room in the comfort of your living room without completely ruining your living room. Also excessive humidity will encourage mould growth (especially at this time of year when there are a lot of cold surfaces for vapour to condense on) which is pretty bad for anyone with asthma. You can get 'steamroom' shower cubicles.
    fair points. I think snuff might be the answer

    Is snuff still a thing? Don't think I've used it in this century. Also, I knew a guy a while back who used chewing tobacco. That was evil.
    The only disability in life is a poor attitude.
  • haydenmhaydenm Posts: 2,868
    Zendog1 wrote:
    I now breath through a hole in my neck - regular nebs essential.

    This is the one I normally use (don't get the Medix version its now discontinued)
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Omron-MicroAIR ... NS1808PXZN

    I have a traditional vibrating one from the NHS for backup but they are VERY NOISY. Not good for a quiet evening sit.

    Woah that looks good, I remember having the NHS nebuliser as a kid and I'm pretty sure it was huge and loud but then I was small.

    Boiling water and a towel does work for me but it doesn't sound like my asthma is nearly as bad
Sign In or Register to comment.