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Assembling a new bike

marcarmmarcarm Posts: 134
edited December 2017 in Workshop
So my new bike should be here soon, and even though I cant ride it yet I want to assemble it, but watching the video on Planet X about assembling a boxed bike, they are talking about greasing certain parts etc.

The only bikes I have ever bought have been from a shop pre-assembled, so can anyone point me in the direction of what type of grease I need etc, and whether it is necessary etc.

I am competent in most minor bike mechanics, but this is not something I have ever done before.

I also assume that I will need to cut the steerer but think I will take it to LBS for that as I don't want to mess it up.

Frame and forks are carbon, seatpost is carbon wrap, stem is also carbon wrap.

Posts

  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I just put copper anti seize grease on the pedals I'm using and off I go.

    Don't rush to have your steerer cut down. Make sure you're happy with your position first.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Normally it just means straightening the forks/bars and fitting the pedals and wheels. Not actually assembling the thing.

    Steerer etc should be cut to size, even if left a bit long there will be spacers.

    And without knowing what parts they say need grease, who can say.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • marcarmmarcarm Posts: 134
    Thanks, I was just going by the PX video, where they install the bars to the stem and the seatpost etc, but I have not bought a PX so guess I won't know until it arrives just how much needs doing.

    Just cant wait to get it built so i can sit and stare at it wishing I was out riding!
  • fudgeyfudgey Posts: 859
    Where abouts are you?

    A boxed bike should be straight forward to assemble.

    All i have ever had to do do is fit bars, seat post, front wheel and cables.
    Then of course index the gears and cut cables, fit/setup brakes and cut cables and alignment.

    If you are near Swindon Wilts and need a hand let me know.
    My winter bike is exactly the same as my summer bike,,, but dirty...
  • marcarmmarcarm Posts: 134
    Colchester Essex!! Might be a bit of a trek for you but your offer is very kind anyway.

    The blurb on the website says
    Every Moda bike purchased undergoes a complete build, pre-delivery inspection (PDI) and is thoroughly tested. The build and test process involves the bike being fully built in a workstand and all parts tested and aligned - this means gears and brakes are set up, all bolts tightened for safety, tyres inflated, pedals installed and removed to check threads.

    So I can't imagine it being too difficult. Might take me a bit longer as I am recovering from a broken leg but I am not in any rush as I cannot ride until the new year at least, so plenty of time to get it set up right!
  • If you buy a bike that's "complete" online etc they are legally bound to give it a safety check and make sure it is assembled correctly so all you need to do is as mentioned adjust the front wheel and bars from when it was packed. Usually they come covered in all sort of bits of tape and stuff to protect the frame and the bars are usually either tucked under the top tube and hooked round to stop them moving about or removed completely and wrapped up. So the most important check is the headset pretention before tightening up the stem. Brakes, gears etc should all be good to go. Saddle height is individual so no doubt you will be moving that anyway.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    fudgey wrote:
    Where abouts are you?

    A boxed bike should be straight forward to assemble.

    All i have ever had to do do is fit bars, seat post, front wheel and cables.
    Then of course index the gears and cut cables, fit/setup brakes and cut cables and alignment.

    If you are near Swindon Wilts and need a hand let me know.

    My PX bikes have been much easier. Turn the bars. Fit pedals. Sorted.
  • marcarmmarcarm Posts: 134
    It has not long arrived, and all I had to do was unwrap it and straighten the bars, didnt even have to put the front wheel in.

    All set up and will live in the kitchen so I can sit and stare at it until I can dial in the settings and get out and ride.

    Might need to adjust the FR though as it doesnt seem to want to catch on the big ring, but that might be because I am trying to do it sitting down so cant do it properly, not a huge job in any case, and change the white bar tape ;)
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    The white bar tape will change itself quickly enough to a more practical shade of grey...

    Do enjoy it when you finally get to ride the thing
  • marcarmmarcarm Posts: 134
    Thanks, it's looking really nice in my kitchen at the moment :)
  • KorhagKorhag Posts: 77
    The PX EC-130E I received this week was mostly ready to go from the get-go, although a few little bits were off, e.g. the vision team 35 wheels are slightly out of true, and the indexing was off. (Probably a case of being banged around or something)

    As with any new bike, I will always take it for a minor service at my LBS and for the most part, it was fine. Before I took it down I had swapped out the spec for an 11-32 ultegra R8000 cassette and dropped the SRAM componentry that they had used for the cassette/chain rather than the slightly more expensive ultegra. This meant it was a little more expensive but in terms of specification, it suited my needs.

    For the most PX did a good job on the components and build. One thing I did learn from their customer service is that if you do not use carbon assembly paste with the carbon seat post and frame then it is not covered under warranty. (The application of which depends on brand/manufacturer. Disappointingly they do not provide even a small quantity of pre-applied paste. Granted this is irrelevant as people should be checking the bike set-up anyway, somebody with the lack of vision for this might be caught out by a relatively simple step if they had an issue and did intend to use their bike straight out of the box.
  • Do they do a ‘bike fit’ before they post out your bike and give you some advice on the bike setup for you?
    If I ran a bike shop I wouldn’t be too happy if people brought their mail order bikes in to be set up properly, stem cut to correct length, etc)
    Rod
  • RodWatts wrote:
    Do they do a ‘bike fit’ before they post out your bike and give you some advice on the bike setup for you?
    If I ran a bike shop I wouldn’t be too happy if people brought their mail order bikes in to be set up properly, stem cut to correct length, etc)
    Rod

    I’m also sure you wouldn’t turn down the business just because they bought it elsewhere
  • Probably wouldn’t but I can tell you for sure that wouldn’t be very happy about it!
  • RodWatts wrote:
    Probably wouldn’t but I can tell you for sure that wouldn’t be very happy about it!

    What if you don't sell the bike brands your local customer base want? My LBS sell Giant and Ridley. I don't care much for either but I still push business there way. They cut the head tube on my Bianchi. I don't think they did it grudgingly
  • My LBS changed over the groupset on my OHs bike (which is a Halfords special).

    At the end of the day, they will know what to charge to turn a profit. If the bike was bought from them they may charge less as their margin could have been made elsewhere.
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    ... They cut the steerer on my Bianchi....
    FIFY :wink:
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • svetty wrote:
    ... They cut the steerer on my Bianchi.
    FIFY :wink:

    Meh, Couldn't think of the right words at the time.
  • RodWatts wrote:
    Probably wouldn’t but I can tell you for sure that wouldn’t be very happy about it!

    Rubbish.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    RodWatts wrote:
    Do they do a ‘bike fit’ before they post out your bike and give you some advice on the bike setup for you?
    If I ran a bike shop I wouldn’t be too happy if people brought their mail order bikes in to be set up properly, stem cut to correct length, etc)
    Rod

    A “bike fit”- what like pull the seat Post up to roughly the right height and maybe, just maybe if they can be bothered, move a spacer or two up or below the stem?

    Good job you don’t have a bike shop mate because I don’t think it would be in business for long.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    RodWatts wrote:
    Do they do a ‘bike fit’ before they post out your bike and give you some advice on the bike setup for you?
    If I ran a bike shop I wouldn’t be too happy if people brought their mail order bikes in to be set up properly, stem cut to correct length, etc)
    Rod

    If I ran a bike shop I wouldn't be turning any potential customers away. Let them bring their internet bargains for setting up, fitting, servicing, repairs and upgrades. No snide comments or snobby attitudes

    And happy or not, you wouldn't get much repeat custom if you go cutting stems down to size...
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    RodWatts wrote:
    Do they do a ‘bike fit’ before they post out your bike and give you some advice on the bike setup for you?
    If I ran a bike shop I wouldn’t be too happy if people brought their mail order bikes in to be set up properly, stem cut to correct length, etc)
    Rod

    Out of interest though, why wouldn't you be happy, Rod?
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • robert88robert88 Posts: 2,696
    dannbodge wrote:
    My LBS changed over the groupset on my OHs bike (which is a Halfords special).

    At the end of the day, they will know what to charge to turn a profit. If the bike was bought from them they may charge less as their margin could have been made elsewhere.

    My LBS will do simple jobs for free. Over the years I have bought 5 bikes from them and had bikes serviced there.

    It's worth getting in with a bike shop but I can't say the same about car dealers!
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Any sensible bike shop will work on any bike brought in.

    My car dealership has been extremely good for us doing bits and pieces for no charge. But obviously we bought the car from them so we've basically paid upfront for the care.
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