Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB general

Cheap bike transportation vehicles

RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
edited November 2017 in MTB general
I'll soon be getting a vehicle which is completely unsuitable for carrying muddy bikes so I'm thinking of getting a cheap estate for dirty duties.
What would people recommend? Needs to be under a grand, estate, petrol, cheap to insurance, bombproof reliability and preferably offensively ugly.

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Older Ford Focus. Not terribly ugly, but tough, OK to drive, cheap parts, reliable. Decent size inside.

    My student son drives one all over the UK and Europe filled with climbing gear and mates. 2004 model or so. Paid about £700 and probably spent a few £00 on random bits over the past few years.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 23,435 Lives Here
    Mondeo, same as above but bigger.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Yep, was considered as well. Choice was made on the basis he had cash in pocket, the Focus was in good condition with a long MOT, and he wanted a car.
    Take my money.
    Good choice for first timer, It was cheaper to insure the estate than a typical tiny learner type 1.3 hatch. Although I doubt that's a consideration for RMSC.
    Presumably estates are all driven by respectable elder types who don't prang that often.
    Although my personal one is a Subaru Imprezza. Which drinks juice like a drunken censored . Otherwise quite nice.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Considering I'll be paying £320 to insure a 540bhp supercharged Jag I don't think insurance will be an issue.
    Focus is a good tip. Dirt cheap, simple to fix and indestructible.
  • nicklongnicklong Posts: 231
    Old Toyota Avensis estate, a mid-90s Merc C220 or any sort of Volvo. There's always someone after a big old estate so you won't lose any money on it. Budget for regular oil topups as they'll be leaking somewhere and buy on condition (i.e. least amount of rust).
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    Fiat Doblo, best car I’ve owned as far as work horses go, remove single rear seat and can put bike in without removing wheels. Jay Kay has one as his daily driver, and he knows a bit about cars!
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    If Jay Kay has one I can't have it. That's the reason I'm not buying a Mercedes E63 AMG
    Old Volvo could be good. Old Mercedes can be a bit hit and miss for reliability.
  • fat daddyfat daddy Posts: 2,605
    veronese68 wrote:
    Mondeo, same as above but bigger.


    this .... the estate is massive in the back, if ever you loose your rack/roof rack you can just throw everything in the back and a cow for fun
  • daniel_bdaniel_b Posts: 8,773
    I have a 2001 V70 T5, but at this age, and mileage (120K) the odd thing is starting to creep up - it is a HEAVY car, so also tends to eat through tyres and brakes - especially if you have an auto - no engine braking opportunities.

    The most reliable car I had, was a 2000 W reg Nissan Primera estate - 60,000 miles, and all I had to spend money on was tyres (But even then I got 40K out of the rears, and 35K out of the fronts) and one single rubber hose that perished.
    Sadly, I think the style after that had more electrical issues.

    Skoda Octavia could also be worth a look - and the Avensis is a good shout too, though not sure how many are about.

    Berlingo or Pug equivalent might be worth a look too.

    What's the Jag - F Type, or XJR type affair?
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Subaru Forester, the square shape means you can get a frame in square on with the wheels off, will take 3 bikes and 3 riders.

    Transit Connect is another option.

    Left Field option is a Daihatsu YRV, for its size the rear is cavernous, the small Daihatsu engines are Rev happy little fun machines and great fun (appeared in an Aston Martin after all) and while the car is buzzy at speed due to the gearing they are reliable, fun to drive and economical. The daughter has had hers for 3 years now.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Daniel B wrote:
    What's the Jag - F Type, or XJR type affair?

    It's an XFR-S saloon. A luxury saloon with a supercar engine. Pretty much my dream car. Like a hooligan in a tailored suit.

    The focus estate is looking like the best option. Solid, durable and cheap. 1.6 petrol engine should be cheap to run.
  • daniel_bdaniel_b Posts: 8,773
    Daniel B wrote:
    What's the Jag - F Type, or XJR type affair?

    It's an XFR-S saloon. A luxury saloon with a supercar engine. Pretty much my dream car. Like a hooligan in a tailored suit.

    Nice, like a modern M5, except with class 8)

    Complete with rear spoiler?
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • duskdusk Posts: 583
    Don't know if an Accord estate would be cheap enough but would be plenty reliable
    YT Wicked 160 ltd
    Cotic BFe
    DMR Trailstar
    Canyon Roadlite
  • doomanicdoomanic Posts: 238
    If it's cheap enough size is less relevant. I used to strap 2 adult bikes to the roof of my Mondeo using the roof rails and tiedown straps, no roof rack, and put the kids bikes in the boot with the seats still up. Get 5 people and bikes moving that way.

    No damage ever resulted from doing it that way but I wouldn't try it on a car worth more than scrap value; sod's law says I'll drop a bike on the roof and damage it. I did get some funny looks at the trail centers though...
  • glynrs2glynrs2 Posts: 4,143
    Citroen Berlingo - certainly ugly and designed to be treated like a shed on wheels, that's how the French like to abuse their vehicles. Surprisingly reliable too being based on a commercial van.
  • eric_draveneric_draven Posts: 1,173
    glynrs2 wrote:
    Citroen Berlingo - certainly ugly and designed to be treated like a shed on wheels, that's how the French like to abuse their vehicles. Surprisingly reliable too being based on a commercial van.

    I was going to suggest on of these or a Renault Kaagoo,after you have driven a rattlely van anything feels super plush after
  • What is this unsuitable car? Can you not get a towbar fitted? For a thousand pounds you can then have a comfortable ride and so can your bikes.
    Would have added benefit of keeping ugly car out of your driveway and save on insurance.
  • daniel_bdaniel_b Posts: 8,773
    What is this unsuitable car? Can you not get a towbar fitted? For a thousand pounds you can then have a comfortable ride and so can your bikes.
    Would have added benefit of keeping ugly car out of your driveway and save on insurance.

    Assuming it is something akin to this:
    b914791416d41eff36e56b3ef70a8477.jpg

    I too would not be wanting to install a towbar on it!
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    What is this unsuitable car? Can you not get a towbar fitted? For a thousand pounds you can then have a comfortable ride and so can your bikes.
    Would have added benefit of keeping ugly car out of your driveway and save on insurance.

    What Daniel B said, and if you'd read the thread you'd know.

    Benefit of an estate is stuff goes inside. Much better at trail centres, motorway services etc as stuff is not dangling off the back attracting scrotes.

    Also useful for taking censored to the dump, collecting furniture and other general usefulnesses.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • daniel_bdaniel_b Posts: 8,773
    cooldad wrote:
    What is this unsuitable car? Can you not get a towbar fitted? For a thousand pounds you can then have a comfortable ride and so can your bikes.
    Would have added benefit of keeping ugly car out of your driveway and save on insurance.

    What Daniel B said, and if you'd read the thread you'd know.

    Benefit of an estate is stuff goes inside. Much better at trail centres, motorway services etc as stuff is not dangling off the back attracting scrotes.

    Also useful for taking censored to the dump, collecting furniture and other general usefulnesses.

    Estates rock, however I am looking into getting a Van :D
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Vans have their place, but I bet my Subaru is much more pleasant on a long drive, and a hell of a lot more fun around the twisty narrow lanes where I live. Especially in S setting.

    Vroom vroom.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Daniel B wrote:
    What is this unsuitable car? Can you not get a towbar fitted? For a thousand pounds you can then have a comfortable ride and so can your bikes.
    Would have added benefit of keeping ugly car out of your driveway and save on insurance.

    Assuming it is something akin to this:
    b914791416d41eff36e56b3ef70a8477.jpg

    I too would not be wanting to install a towbar on it!

    That's it. I'm not cutting the carbon diffuser to fit a tow hitch. Also don't want to put muddy bike kit in it. It's a bit of an investment, they're going up in value already.
    Looks like I'm buying a 1.6 petrol Focus estate. They're great value at this age, I've found a low mileage one for less than a set of tyres for the Jag.
Sign In or Register to comment.