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Higher resting heart rate

rudinrudin Posts: 14
edited December 2017 in Road beginners
Hi everyone!

I noticed that my resting heart rate during my recovery weeks goes up instead of down. I have a recovery week after 3 training weeks. I ride usially for 8-11 hours per week and only 3 hours in zone 1 when i have a recovery week. Am i riding too much or not enough? This week i took a recovery week and my resting heart rate went from 49 to 54+......that is more than 5 bpm diffrence. Can enybody explain what is going on with me.

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  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    Judging from your other two posts, you worry about censored instead of riding your bicycle.

    And don't seem interested in replies anyway.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • rudinrudin Posts: 14
    cooldad wrote:
    Judging from your other two posts, you worry about censored instead of riding your bicycle.

    And don't seem interested in replies anyway.

    I am just worried about myself.......restnig HR should go down when having a recovery week and since i am a beginner, i would like to know as much as possible about training.
  • What method are you using to test your recovery rate? What time of day, stimulation, nutrition? Too many variables
    My blog: http://www.roubaixcycling.cc (kit reviews and other musings)
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  • robertpbrobertpb Posts: 1,866
    Reasons why, poor nights sleep, slight illness, stress, poor readings from HR monitor and what you last ate, one could go on and on.
    Now where's that "Get Out of Crash Free Card"
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    robertpb wrote:
    Reasons why, poor nights sleep, slight illness, stress, poor readings from HR monitor and what you last ate, one could go on and on.
    c

    This plus other stuff I could get all technical about if you want
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    One reading or consistent ones ?
  • rudinrudin Posts: 14
    What method are you using to test your recovery rate? What time of day, stimulation, nutrition? Too many variables
    I use a garmin vivosmart hr watch which displays my resting hr. i also check my hr after waking up, i stay in bed for ten minutes completely still and then i take the lowest number as my resting hr.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Resting HR is probably one of the least important metrics in HR training. I would simply stop measuring it and carry on doing whatever it is you are trying to do.
  • webboowebboo Posts: 2,684
    rudin wrote:
    What method are you using to test your recovery rate? What time of day, stimulation, nutrition? Too many variables
    I use a garmin vivosmart hr watch which displays my resting hr. i also check my hr after waking up, i stay in bed for ten minutes completely still and then i take the lowest number as my resting hr.
    When you do this if your heart rate is more than 10 beats above normal do not move for 24 hours or call for medical assistance.
  • robertpbrobertpb Posts: 1,866
    I thought you were being serious until you said you were using a vivosmart to measure HR
    Now where's that "Get Out of Crash Free Card"
  • navrig2navrig2 Posts: 1,556
    rudin wrote:
    What method are you using to test your recovery rate? What time of day, stimulation, nutrition? Too many variables
    I use a garmin vivosmart hr watch which displays my resting hr. i also check my hr after waking up, i stay in bed for ten minutes completely still and then i take the lowest number as my resting hr.

    Just to show you how irrelevant resting HR try this.

    Start your usual routine, after lying still for 5 minutes start to think about the last time you had a really big issue with something. Perhaps an argument or a traumatic time with a fellow worker. Think about everything that happened, really focusing on this issues and how you felt at the time.

    Then check your resting HR.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Well you say that but the idea is that you're in a similar rested and relaxed state.

    I'm sure it's not perfect but it can be useful. I used to use it when HRM first came out and it was always elevated after a tough Sunday ride.
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    If you are only doing 3 hours in Zone 1 on your recovery weeks this might mean that your circulating volume drops - which might explain your higher resting heart rate. I'd not have such a dramatic decline in efforts on that week - reduce both volume and intensity by 30-50% instead.
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • redvisionredvision Posts: 2,615
    Loads of factors could cause a resting heart rate to increase. For example, eating a large amount of food the day before, or having too much coffee etc.

    Also worth noting that the garmin hr wrist monitors don't record constantly like the fitbits, they take one reading every few seconds (or at least this it what DCR claims), so i wouldn't put too much trust in the readings.
  • I returned my Fenix 5 as it thought that an average rate of 90 was acceptable for a 2 hour 20mph bike effort.
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  • haydenmhaydenm Posts: 2,868
    On my 235 you can switch it from 'smart' to 'continuous' which should be more accurate. I use mine as a RHR check every so often for interest but if I am riding/running I'll have an HR chest strap on, I find the wrist strap takes a while to get up to speed so I do half my 5km pb at some stupidly low HR and it thinks I'm a super hero.
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