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Help a newbie create a Christmas list?

champ222champ222 Posts: 71
edited November 2017 in MTB workshop & tech
Hi all

Just got my first mountain bike. i'd like to keep it in good condition, do my own maintenance etc.

Ive got a birthday coming up, and Christmas is coming. no one ever knows what to get me for Christmas, so its a good opportunity to get some bike bits. I need everything except bike and helmet.

Ive got a few things in mind, but there is no doubt plenty i havent even thought of.

So what tools, cleaning products, spares etc can you think of? if there is a particularly good product that you can recommend, please suggest it.

Cheers guys.

Posts

  • lostboysaintlostboysaint Posts: 4,252
    Trail fun - Transition Bandit
    Road - Wilier Izoard Centaur/Cube Agree C62 Disc
    Allround - Cotic Solaris
  • lostboysaintlostboysaint Posts: 4,252
    If you're running tubeless - get sealant, you'll always need some. If you're not - get tubes, you'll always need some.

    Merino socks for winter (DeFeet Woolie Boolies are the business!), Thinner socks for summer.

    Gloves - try a few pairs, find some you like and add spare pairs to the list - they do wear quickly. A couple of pairs for summer and at least one pair of winter (wind and waterproof is always good!).

    Do you have a proper pair of MTB shorts? Do you have any padded shorts to wear under them? (they make riding much nicer!)

    Clear glasses for winter eye protection? Range from cheap Bolle "safety" glasses up to Oakley or similar. Get some, you really don't want mud and assorted detritus getting in your eyes.

    Buffs - loads of them. Great for that gap around the neck, covering your neck, wearing under your helmet and so on.

    That should keep you going.
    Trail fun - Transition Bandit
    Road - Wilier Izoard Centaur/Cube Agree C62 Disc
    Allround - Cotic Solaris

  • That looks handy... are the tools any good do you know?
  • If you're running tubeless - get sealant, you'll always need some. If you're not - get tubes, you'll always need some...

    Good info, thanks.

    I assume it's not tubeless, so tubes are a good shout. I don't have mtb shorts, or padded shorts... It seems to me that padding would be best on the seat... rather than the shorts... no? Genuine question... I've seen such things for road cyclists so I'm aware such things exist, but I don't really get it if I'm honest.

    Cheers
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Nope, a heavily padded saddle will be comfy for 10 minutes. You need to sit on your bones - it hurts initially but your butt will toughen up.
    Cycling shorts originally had chamois leather in them to absorb sweat and reduce friction. Modern padded shorts have thin padding, for basically the same thing.
    Unless you are planning on doing long in the saddle XC rides, IMO it's not that important. I normally wear a pair under my baggies, but lots of people don't. Especially for shorter rides - you're out of the saddle a lot anyway.
    Decent gear - shorts, jerseys etc though are better to ride in. I rate Endura stuff - I wait for bargains on sale and buy a couple of whatever.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Ahhh I see. So padded shorts are do deal with sweat, rather than to provide more comfort?
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Originally. They do take a bit of pressure off, but are not soft and squishy.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Good to know. Thanks
  • simono5simono5 Posts: 42
    Helmet
    Set of lights for hitting the trails at night
    Decent jacket and water proof
    Decent shoes

    Back pack to carry essentials;
    Water so consider one with a bladder or a water bottle
    Spare tube and pump
    Puncture repair kit
    Multi tool
  • all good info, thanks guys
  • mattyfezmattyfez Posts: 638
    A good digital presssure guage is very handy.
    I've moved away from carrying a pump with me, i use a Co2 pump with two spare cartridges for roadside inflation, although you still need a spare tube and puncture kit just in case.

    One of my better accessories is a track pump for use at home, it's so much easier then a frame pump.
    It's only a really censored muddy fox one that cost a tenner from sports direct. The pressure guage is useless when it even works, but i have a seperate digital pressure guage.
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