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Transporting bikes to Cornwall

tubbs_214tubbs_214 Posts: 185
edited September 2017 in Road general
So I'm going to cornwall in a few weeks. I'm taking my bike down with me to sneak a few early rides in while the other half is in bed. I'm undecided as to how I'm going to transport my bike down. I have 2 options. I have a roof rack which is what I usually use for short trips I'm just worried about the impact on my fuel ecconemy as it's a 330 mile trip. My other option is a rear mount rack which I already have from when I used it on my old car. I will take the wheels of the bike to try and cut down on what is in the wind only problem with this is that my car is tiny so the wheels will take up probably half maybe more of my boot.

I have thought about hiring one but I'd rather have my own bike.

So what are your thoughts.

Cheers.
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Posts

  • tubbs_214 wrote:

    So what are your thoughts.

    Cheers.

    Post it
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • mamba80mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    tubbs_214 wrote:
    So I'm going to cornwall in a few weeks. I'm taking my bike down with me to sneak a few early rides in while the other half is in bed. I'm undecided as to how I'm going to transport my bike down. I have 2 options. I have a roof rack which is what I usually use for short trips I'm just worried about the impact on my fuel ecconemy as it's a 330 mile trip. My other option is a rear mount rack which I already have from when I used it on my old car. I will take the wheels of the bike to try and cut down on what is in the wind only problem with this is that my car is tiny so the wheels will take up probably half maybe more of my boot.

    I have thought about hiring one but I'd rather have my own bike.

    So what are your thoughts.

    Cheers.

    Leave him/her behind, you can then ride all day, save fuel as the car will be lighter.

    You are prepared to hire a larger car.... but wont take a roof rack because of the adverse fuel economy :shock: :shock: :shock:

    Its gonna to be p1ssing with rain for the next few months (or years) down here, i d take a surf board or a kayak.
  • I meant hiring a bike.
  • so 330 miles is an average tank of petrol for a small family car and at 40mpg is 9 gallons costing about £45.
    If you take a 25% reduction to 30 mpg you are looking at 13 gallon costing £65 quid
    Hardly a huge cost. Suggest you drive with the windows closed and the aircon off to save every drop.

    Keep to 65 and that will have the least effect/ maximise fuel economy
  • F' the fuel economy and just get on with it!
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 2,468
    Put it on the roof - and don't go into any multi-storey car parks until you take it off.
  • Ride it.
  • mouthmouth Posts: 1,195
    Whichever way you do it from your two suggested methods, the fuel effect will be fairly minimal, given that you're prepared to pay to hire a bike. A standard BSO (and probably hybrid or MTB) from a local hire place will likely be upwards of £15/day. Whichever way you do it, it'll cost you but I'd rather be on my own bike.
    The only disability in life is a poor attitude.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Rear mount for me. Keep the wheels on it'll make censored all difference.
  • so 330 miles is an average tank of petrol for a small family car and at 40mpg is 9 gallons costing about £45.
    If you take a 25% reduction to 30 mpg you are looking at 13 gallon costing £65 quid
    Hardly a huge cost. Suggest you drive with the windows closed and the aircon off to save every drop.

    Keep to 65 and that will have the least effect/ maximise fuel economy

    get close in behind lorries to maximise the drafting effect. They tend to maintain a steady speed which will help.
  • laurentianlaurentian Posts: 2,324
    What car is it?

    Me and the Mrs always take our bikes when holidaying in the UK. Fold the rear seats of the Golf down, front wheel and saddle off, one bike each side tethered with a bungee to the handle above the door. Wheels and luggage sit between bikes.

    No rack, no fuel implications, much lower risk of damage or theft of the bikes.

    . . . the above of course assumes no children
    Wilier Izoard XP
  • 400 miles each way Cornwall to Yorkshire this summer, two bikes on the roof, 5mpg less.
    Summer - Giant Defy Composite 2 (Force 22) (retd)
    Cannondale Synapse Sram Red ETap
    Winter - Boardman CX Team (Rival X1 Hyd)
  • so 330 miles is an average tank of petrol for a small family car and at 40mpg is 9 gallons costing about £45.
    If you take a 25% reduction to 30 mpg you are looking at 13 gallon costing £65 quid
    Hardly a huge cost. Suggest you drive with the windows closed and the aircon off to save every drop.

    Keep to 65 and that will have the least effect/ maximise fuel economy

    get close in behind lorries to maximise the drafting effect. They tend to maintain a steady speed which will help.


    Mythbusters showed you had to sit 30cm from the bumper to get any noticable diference to fuel economy. not sure id want to be that close!
  • mamba80mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    tubbs_214 wrote:
    I meant hiring a bike.

    ah i see. makes sense now... :oops: Cornwall isnt Mallorca, you d be hard pressed to find a range of decent road bikes for hire, i cant think of any tbh, Bike Ricci maybe?
  • The fuel burn on the single journey isn't an issue, but I see so many racks left on for the whole summer.
    An empty roof rack affects fuel consumption by about 10%, according to RAC.
    https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/driving-advice/fuel-saving-tips/
    10% x 10,000miles @50MPG =20x4.54= 90Litresx£1.20/l = £100/year.
    I wouldn't use a tailgate mount as that will stratch your paint, but that might be the least of your worries( security and safety being the others).
    Best is invest in a proper rear mounted rack.
    Rear-Angle.jpg
  • mouthmouth Posts: 1,195
    The fuel burn on the single journey isn't an issue, but I see so many racks left on for the whole summer.
    An empty roof rack affects fuel consumption by about 10%, according to RAC.
    https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/driving-advice/fuel-saving-tips/
    10% x 10,000miles @50MPG =20x4.54= 90Litresx£1.20/l = £100/year.
    I wouldn't use a tailgate mount as that will stratch your paint, but that might be the least of your worries( security and safety being the others).
    Best is invest in a proper rear mounted rack.
    Rear-Angle.jpg

    My father in law wanted to get one of these kinda things for his X5. The £3500 quote to fit a tow bar was plenty enough to put him off.
    The only disability in life is a poor attitude.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 24,622
    so 330 miles is an average tank of petrol for a small family car and at 40mpg is 9 gallons costing about £45.
    If you take a 25% reduction to 30 mpg you are looking at 13 gallon costing £65 quid
    Hardly a huge cost. Suggest you drive with the windows closed and the aircon off to save every drop.

    Keep to 65 and that will have the least effect/ maximise fuel economy

    get close in behind lorries to maximise the drafting effect. They tend to maintain a steady speed which will help.


    Mythbusters showed you had to sit 30cm from the bumper to get any noticable diference to fuel economy. not sure id want to be that close!
    Anyone who has cycled behind a lorry/bus/tractor will tell you that 30cm is bull...
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • prawnyprawny Posts: 5,438
    I have mine of the roof when we go to Cornwall (and Scotland, and South Wales) doesn't make an appalling difference to fuel economy, about 250 miles each way and thats a mountain bike.

    Don't think I'd bother taking a road bike to cornwall though, even out of season most of the roads are busy. I'd hire a surfboard and wetsuit instead. That's what I'm planning when we go in October.
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
    Voodoo Bizango - 2014 - Dead - Hit by a car
    Vitus Sentier VRS - 2017
  • Do all these variables only apply if going to Cornwall, what if you were going to Ipswich?
  • What if you lay the bike flat on the roof bars?
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • DavidJBDavidJB Posts: 2,019
    165 miles each way? Sounds like a good distance to ride there... ;)
  • Mythbusters showed you had to sit 30cm from the bumper to get any noticable diference to fuel economy. not sure id want to be that close!

    I didn't think that could be correct; and it isn't. 50-100 ft behind and you're saving 10-20%. I'd say 20ft is pushing things a bit, but you see people do it.

    I used to tuck in on the slow lane when I was student in a ford transit van. Used to get 60+ mpg. The lorries also tend to be very smooth speeding up and slowing down, so if you keep to their rhythm then you save there too.

    The best is a national express coach though. You get a few extra mph out of them!

    Back to racks. Even a rack on the back can cost quite a bit in fuel. I have a one that sits quite high on my focus and drops mpg by about 10. I think it's worse than roof rack as the bike is broadside on to the wind. When I've borrowed a tow hitch mounted one which sits far lower the mpg was back to normal.
  • My brother has a lovely back rack on a to bar. Trouble is it makes his car into a long vehicle! Seriously he couldn't park in one car park because it would stick out too far!
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Quite frankly I'd not sacrifice safety in draughting a big truck even if it cut fuel consumption completely.

    Anyway - is the OP there yet ?
  • Fenix wrote:
    Quite frankly I'd not sacrifice safety in draughting a big truck even if it cut fuel consumption completely.
    2 second rule at 60mph is 88 ft. And you should easily out brake a lorry in any case. So, you'd hardly be sacrificing safety at 50-100ft.

    Not saying it's right, but you regularly see cars within 25 ft at 70 mph + and there is a good chance a car could out brake you.

    Not that it helps the OP particularity, but just saying you can certainly get significant benefit in fuel consumption by drafting a lorry at a safe distance. Coupled with the lower speed and smoothing driving style that following trucks encourages I think it's a perfectly valid way to reduce fuel consumption.
  • mamba80mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    Fenix wrote:
    Quite frankly I'd not sacrifice safety in draughting a big truck even if it cut fuel consumption completely.
    2 second rule at 60mph is 88 ft. And you should easily out brake a lorry in any case. So, you'd hardly be sacrificing safety at 50-100ft.

    Not saying it's right, but you regularly see cars within 25 ft at 70 mph + and there is a good chance a car could out brake you.

    Not that it helps the OP particularity, but just saying you can certainly get significant benefit in fuel consumption by drafting a lorry at a safe distance. Coupled with the lower speed and smoothing driving style that following trucks encourages I think it's a perfectly valid way to reduce fuel consumption.

    Given the numbers of people who ve been killed by Lorries on the m/ways recently, i guess staying the xxxx out their way is very good idea, i ve never heard anything more stupid in my life than drafting a lorry on a m/way, moron.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 24,622
    mamba80 wrote:
    Fenix wrote:
    Quite frankly I'd not sacrifice safety in draughting a big truck even if it cut fuel consumption completely.
    2 second rule at 60mph is 88 ft. And you should easily out brake a lorry in any case. So, you'd hardly be sacrificing safety at 50-100ft.

    Not saying it's right, but you regularly see cars within 25 ft at 70 mph + and there is a good chance a car could out brake you.

    Not that it helps the OP particularity, but just saying you can certainly get significant benefit in fuel consumption by drafting a lorry at a safe distance. Coupled with the lower speed and smoothing driving style that following trucks encourages I think it's a perfectly valid way to reduce fuel consumption.

    Given the numbers of people who ve been killed by Lorries on the m/ways recently, i guess staying the xxxx out their way is very good idea, i ve never heard anything more stupid in my life than drafting a lorry on a m/way, moron.
    Have you driven on a motorway in the past 10 years?
    Leave a gap of 100 ft+ and someone will fill it. You'll go backwards to maintain 100 ft! :lol:
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • mamba80mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    No i havent i manage to drive 20 to 30k per year without ever going nr them or DCs like the A30 or A38 either! not.... and have done so for many years, say since 1989.

    tailgating lorries (or anything else) is moronic, you cant see anything ahead an are totally reliant on the lorry drivers reactions or not of any evolving traffic conditions, the lorry driver isnt going to know you r tucked up behind him either... and what if its raining? you ll not see a thing.

    almost all accidents on M/ways are made far worse by the drivers who plough into the original collision or who cause secondary accidents by hitting those who have stopped.

    but you carry on saving fuel.....
  • haydenmhaydenm Posts: 2,997
    Mouth wrote:

    My father in law wanted to get one of these kinda things for his X5. The £3500 quote to fit a tow bar was plenty enough to put him off.

    Rather amusing that it doesn't have a towbar fitted as standard being a 4x4, and that it costs anything like £3500 to have one fitted! Great racks though, after using strapped rear ones for years they are a welcome relief.
  • Got my maths wrong. Two second rule at 60 mph is 176 ft, not 88. So only leaving 50-100 ft to get the benefit is closer than i thought.

    Still, not many people actually leave that distance. So if you're going to drive closer than 176 ft, you might as well do it behind a lorry which won't be able to out brake you.
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