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First sportive

Badgers0580Badgers0580 Posts: 10
edited August 2017 in Road beginners
Hi there I have been riding for about 3 weeks and have signed up for a 34 mile sportive and was wondering the best way to build up my distance I got about 6 weeks, I done 18 miles last nite in 1hr 3mins is that any good for a newbie cheers matt

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  • sh3psh3p Posts: 98
    tbh if you can do 18miles in just over an hour,im sure you can do 34miles without a problem, if you where completely shattered after the 18 ..pace yourself for the 34, if you felt ok i would just ride it as you did ..be sure to hydrate :)
  • riekorieko Posts: 121
    I'd say your current time for 18 miles is pretty decent. Obviously a lot depends on gradient and conditions but you would have no problems doing 34 miles.

    If you have to, just knock the pace down a touch and if you still have plenty in the legs towards the end then go a bit harder then.
    Giant TCR
    Giant TCX
  • lakesludditelakesluddite Posts: 1,337
    Hi there I have been riding for about 3 weeks and have signed up for a 34 mile sportive and was wondering the best way to build up my distance I got about 6 weeks, I done 18 miles last nite in 1hr 3mins is that any good for a newbie cheers matt

    My 18 mile commute takes me 1:10, and I've been doing it for years! To be fair it is hilly!

    You'll be fine - the jump from 18 to 34 won't seem that much. Just increase your distance by 3-5 miles per ride, and you'll be there in no time. Six years ago my 18 mile commute used to kill me, now I extend the commute home to 30-40 miles just to feel like I've made it worthwhile.
  • Stupot07Stupot07 Posts: 19
    Hi, Just wondered whether you were doing the sportive on your own or whether you have some friends or family that are also doing it with you? I'd like to sign up for one, but i don't have anyone to go with, just wondered whether its normal that you may be on your own?
  • webboowebboo Posts: 4,262
    Stupot07 wrote:
    Hi, Just wondered whether you were doing the sportive on your own or whether you have some friends or family that are also doing it with you? I'd like to sign up for one, but i don't have anyone to go with, just wondered whether its normal that you may be on your own?
    Never enter one on your own. People will view you like some sort of sexual deviant.
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,216
    I rode my first one on my own, didn't have a clue. Chatted with loads of riders en route, had a great time, got back to the finish (I was the first back who entered the short route - and I set off very early) and told staff/officials that I was back and they looked at me as if I expected a mariachi band and a yellow jersey.
    I was really inmpressed by my own performance and they clearly didn't give a censored - why would they? Just remember that it's your event, for you, ride it and enjoy it and you'll be fine.
  • meursaultmeursault Posts: 1,433
    As a general rule, I train for a longer ride by doing the distance multiplied by half again. When you can ride that, you can ride the original distance reasonably comfortably.
    Superstition sets the whole world in flames; philosophy quenches them.

    Voltaire
  • essexianessexian Posts: 185
    As others have said, the step up from 18 to 34 miles shouldn't be that much of an issue as long as everything goes to plan on the day.

    Talking about the day: a few tips from someone who has done 20 plus sportives in the last two years if I may...

    Firstly: IT'S NOT A RACE.... go at your own pace and enjoy yourself.

    Secondly, make sure your bike and you are in good condition and carry whatever you need for the ride. While it is likely that there will be at least one food stop along the way, take some food with you. You should also fill your water bottles up at home.... sometimes the water at sportives just doesn't taste nice. Also, take at least one spare innertube/pump/ tyre levers with you. Trust me, walking any distance in cycling shoes is not something you want to do. You may wish to take more kit with you than this, but this is the minimum.

    Thirdly....have I said IT'S NOT A RACE.... although expect some riders to treat the ride as such. Stay left unless overtaking which should ALWAYS be done to the right. And remember, normal rules of the road apply so that red light means STOP.... (car drivers could do with learning that as well!!!). Expect some close passes, especially from chain gangs. It's irritating so chase them down and give them a piece of your mind!.... talking about pacing, I often try to find someone I know I am faster than and sit 20 or so metres behind them for a few miles to ensure I don't go off to fast. If however, you are a nice person unlike me, working together saves energy and will get you round quicker.

    Fourthly... make sure you get your kit ready the night before and arrive at the venue in good time. No point in rushing around before you set off and REMEMBER YOUR CYCLING SHOES...... (yes, I have forgotten them twice now).

    Have I mentioned that it's not a race? Given that, there will not be a "sweep team" following along later to collect your gel wrappers, so take them home with you! Yes, they will make your kit sticky but then, washing them is something your wife/girlfriend/mother will love to do for you......yes, sexist statement but frankly, she would rather do the washing than let me mess about with the machine.

    Also, if people have come out to watch/help out, remember to say: "Thank you" to them. After all, they don't have to come out on a Sunday to watch a load of fit young men in lycra did they......

    Finally: I am sure I have forgotten something, but ENJOY YOURSELF.
  • awaveyawavey Posts: 2,368
    appreciate it may make me sound antisocial, but Ive always ridden sportives on my own, my friends who ride bikes either fall into the pootle to the shops/pub is considered a long way or are way faster than I can keep up with and they have to spend all their time waiting for me to catch up, neither of which is a fun way to ride a sportive, so we dont bother and I go on my own.

    I think if you can do 18miles in a hour, completing 34 shouldnt be a problem, pacing is the key for me, I know what is a comfortable pace for me to hit, ~ 15mph, and I stick to it as best I can, and just try to stay feeling comfortable.

    normally I find the first 10-15miles are actually slower pace because youll be caught in bunches/groups of people who might be slower than you, or may themselves be pacing it, or are close enough to your speed you cant really overtake (or if you do you constantly get retaken), I dont sit on their wheel as such but usually follow a few bike lengths back and just use them as pace setters, the benefit of that is by pacing you will find you have more energy to use nearer the end, when lots of people who just went full gas from the off are really struggling to finish.

    do note where the climbs are so you are prepared for them, and take as much food as you think youll need. sportives do provide stuff, but its not a banquet they put out for you, sometimes its here have this cookie and this small sport drink and a piece of banana, which might not be what you need to keep energy levels topped up.

    also maybe not so much of an issue on 34 miles, but keep hydrated, dont wait till you are thirsty to drink.

    I find chunking the distance down into little bits helps so when youve done 3.4 miles, you are 10% completed, 6.8 20% , over 12 miles and you are 1/3rd complete and so on.
  • Garry HGarry H Posts: 6,639
    You'll be fine. Going further is a lot easier than going faster.

    Contrary to the above; everything is a race.
  • Garry H wrote:
    You'll be fine. Going further is a lot easier than going faster.

    Contrary to the above; everything is a race.

    As Garry H says, some will treat this like a race. Spot them before the start line warming up to threshold, and hang on to their wheel as long as you can. In the last mile or two overtake them and take the glory.
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,779
    Hi there I have been riding for about 3 weeks and have signed up for a 34 mile sportive and was wondering the best way to build up my distance I got about 6 weeks, I done 18 miles last nite in 1hr 3mins is that any good for a newbie cheers matt

    Is this a joke? Someone who averages 18 mph and asks for training advice to ride 34 miles?

    If it's not a joke... then look, I have been riding for over 20 years... occasionally I manage to average 18mph, not very often... I am not old or fat or out of shape... I can ride 200 miles without too much bother... I think you are seriously over thinking this... anyone can ride 34 miles, I know guys who weigh 22 stones and can ride a lot further than that... let alone someone who can average 18 mph
  • steve91steve91 Posts: 30
    Hi there I have been riding for about 3 weeks and have signed up for a 34 mile sportive and was wondering the best way to build up my distance I got about 6 weeks, I done 18 miles last nite in 1hr 3mins is that any good for a newbie cheers matt

    Is this a joke? Someone who averages 18 mph and asks for training advice to ride 34 miles?

    If it's not a joke... then look, I have been riding for over 20 years... occasionally I manage to average 18mph, not very often... I am not old or fat or out of shape... I can ride 200 miles without too much bother... I think you are seriously over thinking this... anyone can ride 34 miles, I know guys who weigh 22 stones and can ride a lot further than that... let alone someone who can average 18 mph
    I'd say it's a confidence thing. I only ride 7 miles a day to commute, and I signed up earlier to a 25 mile charity ride, and that seems like a huge step up to me given than the furthest I've ridden s 15 miles last weekend!

    To OP, I'd increase your distance you ride slowly, to the sacrifice of speed. I average 18mph to and from work, but found dropping to 16mph still felt quick enough, but I found my legs lasted longer.
  • Riding fast and riding long aren't necessarily the same. Riding within your limits at z2-3 to avoid burning all your matches in one go and not going flat out from the gun will help, as will getting your nutrition right so you aren't bonking an hour into the ride!

    Good luck!
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,779
    We are stating the obvious here... but let's assume the worst... the OP goes like a train and bonks after 20 miles... it's still only 14 miles to go. You can walk 14 miles... it's a long walk, but this is beyond having a backup plan.

    The reality is that the OP doesn't need any advice. The distance is comfortably within his ability and he should just get on with it and enjoy the day. This thread is a waste of time
  • Cheers guys for all your helpful comments, have gone clipless, definitely better especially on the hills for me. Went out and done 36 miles and averaged 16.6 mph again thanks for all your comments
  • Cheers guys for all your helpful comments, have gone clipless, definitely better especially on the hills for me. Went out and done 36 miles and averaged 16.6 mph again thanks for all your comments

    Remember to ride your own event pace that way you won't destroy yourself too early like I did in my first one.
  • mac9091mac9091 Posts: 196
    Hi there I have been riding for about 3 weeks and have signed up for a 34 mile sportive and was wondering the best way to build up my distance I got about 6 weeks, I done 18 miles last nite in 1hr 3mins is that any good for a newbie cheers matt

    Is this a joke? Someone who averages 18 mph and asks for training advice to ride 34 miles?

    If it's not a joke... then look, I have been riding for over 20 years... occasionally I manage to average 18mph, not very often... I am not old or fat or out of shape... I can ride 200 miles without too much bother... I think you are seriously over thinking this... anyone can ride 34 miles, I know guys who weigh 22 stones and can ride a lot further than that... let alone someone who can average 18 mph

    He might average 18mph around pan flat Cambridgeshire but the sportive might be somewhere more hilly.

    OP: I'd say to look to average 16Mph to the feed stop, have a decent break and then see if you can better your average speed on the way back in.

    Which one you doing?
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 61,010 Lives Here
    Hi there I have been riding for about 3 weeks and have signed up for a 34 mile sportive and was wondering the best way to build up my distance I got about 6 weeks, I done 18 miles last nite in 1hr 3mins is that any good for a newbie cheers matt

    Yup yup, you'll be fine.
  • My first big bike ride is coming up.

    1 question I have is how the do you put your number on the bike?!
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Cable ties or a number holder thing or pin it to your tee shirt.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • Cable ties or a number holder thing or pin it to your tee shirt.

    And remember to take it off 3 months later
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Cable ties or a number holder thing or pin it to your tee shirt.

    And remember to take it off 3 months later


    This. Most definitley this.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • do they give you the cable ties? or do you bring your own?

    Normally at a running event you will be provided with them if you pick your number up on the day which in this case for the ride you do.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    They should provide them but I carry some in my emergency pack anyway as they are a most useful thing to have with you, take up no space and weigh almost nothing.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • Cheers again guys, I am doing the mendip sportive. Have been training hard and done 41 miles and averaged 17.2 mph with just under 1000ft of climb so think I'm ready with about 2and half weeks to go
  • awaveyawavey Posts: 2,368
    mills2510 wrote:
    do they give you the cable ties? or do you bring your own?

    Normally at a running event you will be provided with them if you pick your number up on the day which in this case for the ride you do.

    last few Ive done theyve been provided, though that said I remember on my first one a few years back now I used clothes pegs to attach the number to my top, worked quite well actually even if I did look like a complete idiot :lol:

    its trying to work out the best place to attach the cable ties to your bike thats the tricky bit as you suddenly find youve got way more clutter and cables getting in the way than you realised.
  • figbatfigbat Posts: 680
    I take my own cable ties too... sometimes they are a bit stingy with them in terms of quantity and/or length. I also take something to cut the excess off.

    Remember to think about after the ride too... what will you wear to get home? Do you want any specific post-ride recovery/treats?
    Cube Reaction GTC Pro 29 for the lumpy stuff
    Cannondale Synapse alloy with 'guards for the winter roads
    Fuji Altamira 2.7 for the summer roads
    Trek 830 Mountain Track frame turned into a gravel bike - for anywhere & everywhere
  • step83step83 Posts: 4,162
    I put my number on the seatpost peloton style, works if you don't have a bag, an if they don't stipulate it has to be in x position.
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