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Securing bikes in wooden shed

germcevoygermcevoy Posts: 414
edited July 2017 in Road buying advice
Looking for a few tips. Two road bikes will be moving residence from the hall and kitchen to the new garden shed. Back garden gate has a bulky lock on it to start. The single cheap dead bolt on the shed is to be replaced with three of higher quality and I'll round the botls on the hinged.

On to the inside. A proper ground anchor isn't an option as I don't have a concrete base. Working plan is to have a large enough container that I can fill with cement. I'll then submerge two D-locks which i can then chain each bike too through the frame and rear wheels.

Sound secure enough or any other recommendations?

Posts

  • herb71herb71 Posts: 247
    Something like this might work.

    http://www.groundbolt.co.uk/Motorcycles.html

    Pull out loads are pretty good!
  • staffostaffo Posts: 82
    I have one of these used with a 13mm chain and high security padlock.
    http://securityforbikes.com/products.php?cat=Shed+Shackle
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    Assuming the shed doesn't have any windows I'd be wary of having too many visible high quality padlocks etc on the outside of it - better not to alert potential thieves to the valuable contents - similarly with anything on the gate.

    Obviously make sure gates and shed are locked, but don't put a fortune of padlocks on display - shed shackle above looks good but does arguably advertise contents worth stealing!

    D lock in cement sounds a decent idea, although I wouldn't rule out screwing anchor points to eg sturdy floor beams - I used to keep my bikes in a wooden shed in my old place, and because the anchor points were up against the wall of the shed the bikes made it rather tricky to get to (and so attack) the anchor points without also removing the shed wall.

    Ultimately best bet might be to talk to your insurers/investigate what you would need to do to cover bikes in the shed - you can only do so much to secure bikes wherever they are.

    You could also consider one of the secure metal bike-locker type sheds if that is the primary reason for getting the shed!
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    I used one of these:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Heavy-Duty-Mo ... Sw-itXrGom
    2 holes in shed floor, chain through. job done..
  • remedy_7remedy_7 Posts: 179
    I use a 24kg kettlebell.
    Impossible to pick up a bike and the bell together because it is too awkward and you can't get your hand around the handle due to the D-lock.
    Sounds daft but works. I even take the kb in the van with me so I can lock up the bikes at campsites. And do a workout.
  • germcevoygermcevoy Posts: 414
    Remedy 7 wrote:
    I use a 24kg kettlebell.
    Impossible to pick up a bike and the bell together because it is too awkward and you can't get your hand around the handle due to the D-lock.
    Sounds daft but works. I even take the kb in the van with me so I can lock up the bikes at campsites. And do a workout.

    Sounds less messy than dealing with mixing cement too. The idea was to get an anchor point and to make it awkward for bikes and locks to be lifted to be dealt with after a theft. Any heavy weight would do I guess.
  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 8,376
    How big is your Shed?, would one of these fit inside http://www.asgardsss.co.uk/bike-cycle-s ... ike-locker
  • g00seg00se Posts: 2,220
    if this for piece of mind - or an insurance stipulation? If the latter, there are decent insurance options that just generally require the shed to be locked (no need for anchors or Sold Secure equipment) - though I suppose this may depend on the area you live in.
  • germcevoygermcevoy Posts: 414
    g00se wrote:
    if this for piece of mind - or an insurance stipulation? If the latter, there are decent insurance options that just generally require the shed to be locked (no need for anchors or Sold Secure equipment) - though I suppose this may depend on the area you live in.

    Piece of mind. Haven't looked at the insurance yet. Either way, stolen bikes with good insurance is still a nuisance. I just want to make things awkward should somebody get access to the shed.
  • redjeepǃredjeepǃ Posts: 520
    This has been discussed in the past and one of the solutions was to cut a hole in the floor, dig a big hole in the ground beneath it and fill it with concrete with a D ring sticking out. Then put the shed floor back. Probably easier to do if you can move the shed for a few hours, otherwise it may be a bit like reenacting a scene from the Great Escape.

    I'd suggest that if you're going to do this, that instead of digging a massive hole, you dig a moderate sized hole and then bang a few 1 meter lengths of rebar partially into the ground before you pour the concrete. That way it'll be anchored into the ground very securely without so much effort.

    Personally I poured a large concrete beam and included 3x conduits through the width of it that were large enough to loop a very thick chain through. I then chain the bikes to the beam. I used three lengths of the red high voltage cable conduit that you use if you're burying cables. I even threw in a few lengths of rebar just to be sure.

    Worked a treat.

    Other people have filled dustbins or barrels with concrete. Whatever suits.
  • shaw8670shaw8670 Posts: 264
    Keep the wheels (or some of them) in the house and use mutiple locks to lock them together in a heap, upside down, partly covered and they'll look just like a pile of old broken bikes, unless thieves really know what they are doing and want to take a big tangle of metal away. You good get 2 beat up old bikes and lock your good bike in between both of them. That would be a lot of carrying or lock breaking. I agree with previous post that bling locks just draw attention to your shed.
    Greetings from the wet and windy North west
  • londoncommuterlondoncommuter Posts: 1,550
    Can you move something less important to the shed like the washing machine, fridge or cooker? Not sure you've got your priorities right here.
  • joey54321joey54321 Posts: 1,297
    Interesting, I have been keeping my bikes in the house but I have a housemate moving in with yet more bikes so might have to start keeping some in the shed.

    Does anyone have some good advice about looking after nice bikes that live in sheds? I am worried about them getting rusty etc...? Sorry to hijack the thread a bit.
  • davidofdavidof Posts: 2,368
    My mountainbike suffered after a couple of winters in our shed - even the alloy was corroding in places.
    As for ground anchors, it gives someone the chance to use long bolt croppers and use the ground for leverage and snip through your chain or D lock. What's it take? about 60 seconds to snip a top quality chain.
  • ayjayceeayjaycee Posts: 1,333
    davidof wrote:
    My mountainbike suffered after a couple of winters in our shed - even the alloy was corroding in places.

    Sorry to disagree / contradict but I would suggest that your shed couldn't have been very weather proof and / or the bike was put away wet and never got the chance to dry out properly. I've always kept my bikes in the shed and never had any issues with corrosion.
    Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra
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  • ti_yredti_yred Posts: 50
    Have a search for a Shed Bar, particularly any having the 'Secured by Design' logo. We used to recommend them when I did my Crime Prevention stint in the Police.

    http://www.securedbydesign.com/crime-pr ... d-garages/

    Your local force should have a Crime Risk Manager or someone similar who can advise you on the above
  • bing gordonbing gordon Posts: 662
    The simplest is always the best;-

    https://www.onegarden.co.uk/accessories ... Apqx8P8HAQ

    then a chain (as below) running through the 2 bikes and through the loops

    http://www.almax-security-chains.co.uk/ ... 9-123.aspx

    You might think it's a bit OTT but if you have a few bikes then it's a small price to pay for peace of mind.

    I'm fully aware a grinder will go through it I know but, 9 times out of 10 it's opportunist who brake in sheds and nick bikes not organised thieves with a battery operated 4" grinder.

    If they want it they'll get it but to me it's all about putting them off or slowing them down and making them make one hell of a racket. Mine runs through the loops then through 2 bikes and locked with a Squire padlock. 99% of the time I'm in or my spyeye neighbour so were covered as best as we both can.
    I also have it alarmed and I have one more little surprise awaiting them which I prefer to keep private :)
  • bing gordonbing gordon Posts: 662
    2 interesting video's here, both worth a watch:-
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC3hFr8p2ck

    and the Almax

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozppzywsLsk
  • germcevoygermcevoy Posts: 414
    Have sourced a 36kg kettle bell. This will sit between the two bikes and I'll lock each bike to the bell with a good quality chain. 36kg plus too bikes should be too heavy for any scum to lift the lot out to work on elsewhere. I'll either keep front wheels in house or just cable lock them to the frame. I'll then put all the bulkier shed items in front of the bikes to further hinder.

    Also have two slightly better locks for the shed door (nothing too bling)
  • bing gordonbing gordon Posts: 662
    I originally had a 12mm chain and they bolt cropped it, as least with the Almax I know that won't happen again. I lie my fold out ladders on their side and chain through that as well. All in all they'd have to drag the shed with them over the barb wire, (forgot about that) and tackle our new dog who doesn't like strangers
  • remedy_7remedy_7 Posts: 179
    36kg. Bloody hell.

    2 other ideas I use -
    Leave a gift. An unlocked front wheel etc. If they can't steal anything, they may get pissed and just trash things.

    Brightly coloured electrical wire. I do this for bikes on the back of a car. The wire is threaded through all the parts, then tucked inside the car. Looks like an alarm wire.
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