First time motorcyclist looking for first bike.

bartman100
bartman100 Posts: 544
edited May 2017 in The cake stop
Taking my CBT next weekend and will be looking for a 125cc to get me started from thereon in.

Anyone got any advice on a decent first bike? I don't want a posey aggressive style bike that's pretending to be one of the big boys. I also don't want to get pulled over by the cops every time I go out (I'm 42).

Something more 'classic' and upright would suit.

I thought maybe one of these:
http://www.motorcyclenews.com/news/firs ... motorbike/

Any tips?

Comments

  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,575
    I wouldn't. It has nothing to do with AJS other than someone has bought the name. It's a cheap Chinese copy of a Honda engine. You are better off buying a used Honda. Nothing fancy just the basic 125. Not sure if it's still a CB125 but you want the equivalent of that.
  • herb71
    herb71 Posts: 253
    If you must get a 125, then second hand Japanese would be my preference, bearing in mind that they would have probably been owned, abused and neglected by poor 17 year olds.

    A better route would be to go through direct access at the earliest opportunity after your CBT and then buy a larger capacity machine.
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Direct access then older CBR600 to learn how to ride properly then either a new 600/675/750, either sports, 'mortard or whatever.

    Jobs a badger.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • eric_draven
    eric_draven Posts: 1,192
    Similar to the last post,do your direct access an look at a 600 bandit/hornet or fazer maybe a naked SV650 ER6 or similar,naked bikes let you know when your picking up speed,as you have no fairing to protect you from the wind,but all will move when you want them to,or maybe a mid size off roader,don't waste your money on a 125,insurance won't be to steep at plus 40,been through the sports bike thing when younger wanting the fastest thing that I could afford,now have a Triumph Tiger 1050 goes well without the mental speeds
  • motogull
    motogull Posts: 325
    What part of the country are you in fella? I've got a contact in a dealership in the north.
  • ProjectObject
    ProjectObject Posts: 145
    Direct access and then a Honda CBR 600. It's the best bike to get experience on. It will commute, tour and go like stink if you want it to. It's likely you will become frustrated by the lack of power of a 125 very quickly. I've got a Honda CBR 1100 Blackbird. I started out on a CBR 600.
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,911
    If it were me I would be happy with a 125 to learn on.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • eric_draven
    eric_draven Posts: 1,192
    If it were me I would be happy with a 125 to learn on.
    A 600 is quite tame at lower revs,there is no point staying on a 125 if you don't need to,I had to because of my age,but I passed my test just after my 18th back then, I was then unrestricted as to what I could ride "except I wouldn't get insurance" for something big
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,911
    Yes I suppose it's personal preference. When I got a kawasaki 500 I just found the weight of it a bit of a surprise and unfaired at 80mph plus I found a bit wearing.

    Depends on the type of riding you are doing I suppose - I grew up with scooters whereas if you are used to a big bike I can see a 125 would seem a little tame. I was thinking of getting another bike but I think I'd be happy with a 250 and I think I'd want a screen on it.

    If the OP does get into motorbikes my tip would be ear protection on any extended trips, no point in getting tinnitus and high frequency hearing loss if you can avoid it.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,600
    In a similar position and riding me dad's old(ish) YBR125 as it was available and easy at the time.

    I get the point of doing a Direct Access if you re going to be a "proper" motorcyclist but I ve had a reasonable amount of fun on it and it's great for commuting/nipping around town. It's enough to give you a flavour of riding country lanes and such too to see if you'd like motorbiking. (I really had no interest in it before I took the CBT). It's enough to practice riding for the test as well and getting used to bikes. Hopefully then you'll need less than a full Direct Access course before you go for the test.

    The problem is that you could spend a few grand on a 125cc ride it for 6 months and then take the proper test and be stuck, or have wasted a not insignificant amount of money, on a bike that's too small to do long journeys, tour and such...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    As above - 600 is tame at low revs, handle well, inexpensive to buy, maintain and insure, fairly lightweight.

    Once you know what you are doing they are some of the best handling bikes out there and still go 160mph.

    750 just gives you a little more ooomph but with all the same benefits.

    And it's more fun burning everything else off on a smaller capacity bike.

    Once he knows what he's doing sell all that junk and go and buy an RGV/KR1S/TDR. Proper bikes don't have cams. Anything 4 stroke is boooooooring and dull.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • bartman100
    bartman100 Posts: 544
    Motogull wrote:
    What part of the country are you in fella? I've got a contact in a dealership in the north.

    The Deep South sadly (well, Somerset) but thanks for the offer.

    Thanks for all the advice. I do take the point about wasting money on something I might then change in 6 months time but all the bikers I know and have spoken to have suggested a 125 to start as a 600 or higher will seem awfully heavy and powerful for someone newish. I'm happy to shell out £2k and take a small hit a year down the road if I decide I need something bigger. This won't be a replacement car and I don't want to be Joey Dunlop. If anything, I'll want something for touring.
  • bartman100
    bartman100 Posts: 544
    Veronese68 wrote:
    I wouldn't. It has nothing to do with AJS other than someone has bought the name. It's a cheap Chinese copy of a Honda engine. You are better off buying a used Honda. Nothing fancy just the basic 125. Not sure if it's still a CB125 but you want the equivalent of that.
    It's cheap but all the reviews I've seen suggest it's very well made. Chinese isn't always a byword for poor engineering.
  • eric_draven
    eric_draven Posts: 1,192
    As above - 600 is tame at low revs, handle well, inexpensive to buy, maintain and insure, fairly lightweight.

    Once you know what you are doing they are some of the best handling bikes out there and still go 160mph.

    750 just gives you a little more ooomph but with all the same benefits.

    And it's more fun burning everything else off on a smaller capacity bike.

    Once he knows what he's doing sell all that junk and go and buy an RGV/KR1S/TDR. Proper bikes don't have cams. Anything 4 stroke is boooooooring and dull.

    Had a RGV250 loved it to bits one of the few bikes I wished still owned,always wanted a RG500 or a RD500 ypvs pocket rockets
  • Mad_Malx
    Mad_Malx Posts: 5,106
    Resale value (and hence purchase price) of Japanese 125s is good because of beginner market. you will recover most of the cost if/when you move up. Chinese devalue faster, but outlay less.
  • ovi
    ovi Posts: 396
    direct access then a Suzuki SV650 and remember 42 is not to old for riding a sporty looking bike. After a couple of years with a SV a Triumph Street Triple would be a good choice.
    I started of with a bandit 600 and upgraded when confidence and skill improved then bought a GSXR 600 which was a cracking bike but was a little boring if you are just cruising about but wound it up above 10 000 rpm and the induction noise was addictive urging you to go faster.
  • NeXXus
    NeXXus Posts: 854
    Direct access and big bike is the way
    And the people bowed and prayed, to the neon god they made.
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Just remember that those who can't ride round corners buy big bikes......
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • slowmart
    slowmart Posts: 4,501
    @ OP. consider what riding what you will be doing in the future? I've left bikes behind simply because of the state of the roads and the standard of driving. It provided some great times and memories, especially with my wife as pillion and also early morning blasts to the north wales coast before plod had their morning briefing and deployed. I'd highly recommend getting your advanced riding qualification as this will make you a better and safer rider.

    In addition consider using a company like the california super bike school (http://www.superbikeschool.co.uk) and they will teach you more about riding a bike around a track and cornering than years of riding on the road will give you. Despite the track bias you will learn an awful lot more than IAM's or any Bikesafe course which are run by your local plod and I highly recommend them to a new biker. The overall view you would get from this approach is informed, relevant and effective.

    Forget all the crap above, get informed yourself and buy to suit your needs now. A larger capacity machine will get you in trouble quicker and when it goes pear shaped it goes wrong very quickly and there isn't a pause button like video game to press and restart again.
    “Give a man a fish and feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Teach a man to cycle and he will realize fishing is stupid and boring”

    Desmond Tutu
  • mamba80
    mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    Death traps, Too many cars

    I had bikes from a kid no way would I advise a novice to get a cbr6, docile my arse.
    I packed in bikes an my last one was an R1 after my mate was killed, over the years I ve known perhaps 15 friends die or lose limbs.

    Mc are fantastic fun and I ve great memories but it's snugs game now

    Get one of those big scooters if it's for commuting.
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    mamba80 wrote:
    Death traps, Too many cars

    I had bikes from a kid no way would I advise a novice to get a cbr6, docile my ars*.
    I packed in bikes an my last one was an R1 after my mate was killed, over the years I ve known perhaps 15 friends die or lose limbs.

    Mc are fantastic fun and I ve great memories but it's snugs game now

    Get one of those big scooters if it's for commuting.

    Yeah they are - not an RR model, older Ali framed or if he can find a decent one, steel framed.

    Absolutely brilliant first big bikes.

    Or a Hornet 600. That's an option.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,911
    mamba80 wrote:
    Death traps, Too many cars

    I had bikes from a kid no way would I advise a novice to get a cbr6, docile my ars*.
    I packed in bikes an my last one was an R1 after my mate was killed, over the years I ve known perhaps 15 friends die or lose limbs.

    Mc are fantastic fun and I ve great memories but it's snugs game now

    Get one of those big scooters if it's for commuting.

    Since coming back to 2 wheels with an engine a couple of years ago the awareness of what would happen if that car waiting at the side road pulled out in front of me has been an issue whereas 20-30 years ago it never crossed my mind. I guess it's that old cliche the less life you have left the more carefully you guard it but I know a big bike would be wasted on me as I am too risk averse these days.

    I rode scooters mostly but even then I knew a couple of people who were killed and my older brother's best mate was killed in a bike accident ( ironically my brother who was also a biker was killed in a car accident a couple of years later).

    I would hate it if one of my kids got a bike now - hypocrisy I know but I don't really like the fact my son has started going out on his mountain bike
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • eric_draven
    eric_draven Posts: 1,192

    I would hate it if one of my kids got a bike now - hypocrisy I know but I don't really like the fact my son has started going out on his mountain bike

    My old man had similar sentiment over 3 out of 4 sons riding bikes,even though him and my mother went all over on one in the late 50's early 60's,even touring round Europe back then,we always got to many cars on the road,but we always said it's what we learned with and were used to it,but I know he was never comfortable with us on them,glad I have had one to many good times on them
  • herb71
    herb71 Posts: 253
    I wouldn't be without mine. I am a RoSPA advanced motorcyclist. (its not nearly as dull as it sounds). Most of my rides are RoSPA rides these days. Too many hobbies, not enough time.