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5 Quietly Brilliant Road Products

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  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 22,949
    Rolf F wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSvIWeZj3zDUCsDWWfLGJJwtDulTabJw2SVAgvWB0jumsyBWAwIULplrQ

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSB2Jw8WmzQiby9VbfO3-kWbpBlgtLtpTCGplzZF2OTKPt7LPdE

    $_86.JPG

    (Photo's taken from keef66's stock)

    The scary thing about those was trying to ride on unlit roads with them - they didn't manage to light up any of the tarmac. If you were lucky they might light up a bit of whatever was next to the road before you went off it.
    Not only this, but the weight of the D cells was enough to bounce them out of the contacts when you hit a bump. 20 years later, I still have a vivid memory of riding across a completely unlit Siston Common - road edged with 12" strip/shallow ditch of loose gravel and then grass interspersed with 8" square stone blocks at 2' centres - when those bloody things decided to plunge me into complete blindness.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    rjsterry wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    (Photo's taken from keef66's stock)

    I still have a vivid memory of riding across a completely unlit Siston Common - road edged with 12" strip/shallow ditch of loose gravel and then grass interspersed with 8" square stone blocks at 2' centres - when those bloody things decided to plunge me into complete blindness.

    You're here, which means you survived to tell the tale.

    To think I went out with Eastbourne Rovers on a Tuesday nights in winter with them on. 'Kin 'ell.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 22,949
    Pinno wrote:
    rjsterry wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    (Photo's taken from keef66's stock)

    I still have a vivid memory of riding across a completely unlit Siston Common - road edged with 12" strip/shallow ditch of loose gravel and then grass interspersed with 8" square stone blocks at 2' centres - when those bloody things decided to plunge me into complete blindness.

    You're here, which means you survived to tell the tale.

    To think I went out with Eastbourne Rovers on a Tuesday nights in winter with them on. 'Kin 'ell.

    I remember thinking, "Oh ****! Right, brake, but not too sharply or you'll skid on the gravel and go down anyway." I then got a set with a basic LED rear and a halogen front powered off a small leaf acid battery. Heavy, and barely an hour of charge, but very bright.

    http://www.ebay.com/p/Vistalite-Vl420-H ... 1969717160
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    Why is that link with ebay prices in Norwegian Kroner ?!

    Back OT: There are better options.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 22,949
    keef66 wrote:
    That reminds me, i need something better to cut the stays down on my tortec reflector mudguards. I got new ones after i crumpled my rear one. I've fitted it without the plastic caps as the beefy snips i got couldn't cut the stays. Good steel those stays.

    Don't ride it with the stays untrimmed / capped. You'll invariably impale yourself at some point.

    Easiest with some decent bolt croppers. But buying some only really makes sense if you have another use for them. Know anyone you could borrow from?

    I've successfully used a Dremel with a cutting disc. You can cut and finish them accurately / neatly with the guards on the bike. Just let them cool a bit before trying to fit the caps.

    The Dremel also gets a lot of use finishing the ends of cable outers after cutting with cable cutters.

    Worst option is a hacksaw. Even with a brand new blade it takes a surprisingly long time, and ideally you need to take them off the bike and clamp the stays in a vice
    .

    True, you need to measure up, then remove the stays for cutting, but just gripping them in some heavy pliers and a proper hacksaw (not junior) blade was fine. Cut most of the way through, snap off and remove burr with file. Or croppers if you have them.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 4,021
    I'd borrow my dad's large bolt croppers but after the last time I borrowed them the jaws don't meet! It seems I bought a better quality padlock than the bolt croppers. Only a thin padlock too.

    Wish i could justify a dremel.
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 9,608
    SME wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    In this forum the only correct answer should be cake.

    1. Cake !!! (OK at stops)
    2. Jelly babies (when on the go)
    3. Flapjacks

    Room for two more?

    1. Agreed.
    2. As long as they're vegetarian!
    3. No thanks - low-residue diet for me.

    :)


    The things I would nominate have already been. I'd possibly add Alé bibshorts. Are they quietly brilliant? Well they're certainly brilliant and don't break the bank. And they don't really steal the limelight like Rapha, Castelli and Assos.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    Wtf is a 'low-residue diet'? Less bog roll use?
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 19,992
    I'd borrow my dad's large bolt croppers but after the last time I borrowed them the jaws don't meet! It seems I bought a better quality padlock than the bolt croppers. Only a thin padlock too.

    Wish i could justify a dremel.
    There was me thinking that you just did! :lol:
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 9,608
    Pinno wrote:
    Wtf is a 'low-residue diet'? Less bog roll use?

    Low fibre. It's a medical requirement.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    Ben6899 wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    Wtf is a 'low-residue diet'? Less bog roll use?

    Low fibre. It's a medical requirement.

    Less bog roll use then :wink:
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 9,608
    Pinno wrote:
    Ben6899 wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    Wtf is a 'low-residue diet'? Less bog roll use?

    Low fibre. It's a medical requirement.

    Less bog roll use then :wink:

    It brings it in line with 'normal' folk. :)
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    Ben6899 wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    Ben6899 wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    Wtf is a 'low-residue diet'? Less bog roll use?

    Low fibre. It's a medical requirement.

    Less bog roll use then :wink:

    It brings it in line with 'normal' folk. :)

    Yes it probably does. Me I eat Weetabix before bed every night without fail.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • crispybug2crispybug2 Posts: 2,915
    Pinno wrote:

    $_86.JPG


    I remember having a set of these, they were a Christmas present from my grandad, I know some posters on here comment on the weight of these but at the time I got them I was riding a Raleigh Grifter and, let's be blunt, you could've strapped a sack of concrete to it and it wouldn't have made that much difference to the overall weight of the bike!!!
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    Warning - way off topic:

    My then mate had a Grifter*. He wore out pairs of shoes so often because he was using them as brakes. This compounded by the fact that he was slightly podgy and this (dirty) old town is quite hilly in bits.
    One day, determined to 'race' me as I was with the local cycling club and he was intent on proving himself faster and stronger, he took off along this narrow path. By the end of the narrow path he was trucking and in full flow, occasionally looking over his shoulder to asses the gap between me and him. At the end of this path was a road. A quiet road but a road nonetheless and he wasn't stopping, no matter how hard he tried and into the road and whack into the side of this car, over the bonnet and onto the pavement. My initial thoughts were that he was dead or seriously injured. The lady got out of her car, her face a picture of concern, anguish actually. Said bloke stands up, slightly bewildered but none the worse for wear.
    The front wing of the car was badly dented such was the force of podgy Grifter bloke and the combined mass. The Grifter was virtually unharmed (unfortunately).
    Lucky barsteward.

    *I quickly discovered that he was a [email protected] of epic proportions.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 19,992
    So, in summary, you were beaten by a fat boy on a Grifter? :lol::lol::lol:
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    That reminds me, i need something better to cut the stays down on my tortec reflector mudguards. I got new ones after i crumpled my rear one. I've fitted it without the plastic caps as the beefy snips i got couldn't cut the stays. Good steel those stays.

    This reminds me that I didn't have anything to cut the stays on my guards and got some sugru to go round the end of it.

    I think that was about 5 years ago - it's still there.

    Actually another bit of sugru is holding the stay into the guard after the nut sheared off with me tightening it a fraction too much.

    Sugru is great for all sorts of bike repairs !
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    PBlakeney wrote:
    So, in summary, you were beaten by a fat boy on a Grifter? :lol::lol::lol:

    Au contraire monsieur, most of his efforts were short lived and I was fully aware of the brake problem coupled with the road conundrum. The moment he took off, my mind starts thinking...
    When I get a moment later, i'll tell you about Grifter and Podgy bloke part 2.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • Right, back on topic:

    1. Shimano Romin saddle
    2. Garmin 800
    3. Cheap Cree lights from Amazon (blindingly bright lifesavers)
    4. Clipless pedals
    5. Power meter and Strava
    6. STI

    With the above items, I can plan a route, comfortably ride all day without getting lost or a sore @rse, commute on unlit roads, and then measure my performance after a ride.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    6!? That'll please Rolf F.

    What's with this foam roller? I tried a Rolling pin but it wasn't much fun.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • Pinno wrote:
    6!? That'll please Rolf F.
    7. Pinno - a Godfather of bikeradar and one of the few people you could trust to babysit your drunk wife.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 46,275
    Pinno wrote:
    6!? That'll please Rolf F.
    7. Pinno - a Godfather of bikeradar and one of the few people you could trust to babysit your drunk wife.

    You think?!

    That's one helluva mixed compliment. I'm glad i'm sitting down.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,903
    Pinno wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    6!? That'll please Rolf F.
    7. Pinno - a Godfather of bikeradar and one of the few people you could trust to babysit your drunk wife.

    You think?!

    That's one helluva mixed compliment. I'm glad i'm sitting down.

    Or perhaps FS24 is being less than complimentary about his missus?
  • I've met my wife, and Bally's right.
  • In no particular order

    1) Rapha Classic jersey
    2) New 105 groupset
    3) Fizik Aliante saddle
    4) Vittoria Corsa G+ tyres
    5) My Gabba :)
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,288
    I had some corsa G+ tyres. Thought they were pretty average and non descript. What's quietly brilliant about them?
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,337
    Shortfall wrote:
    I had some corsa G+ tyres. Thought they were pretty average and non descript. What's quietly brilliant about them?

    I was going to say that there's nothing "quietly" brilliant about the Gabba. Even if you believe it's brilliant (I don't, YMMV) it has to be one of the more hyped cycling products for a while (and well done it was).
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • earthearth Posts: 934
    Drop handlebars.

    I can ride all day with these without numbness or discomfort. Went out of a ride today on a MTB. I have been trying a variety of flat handlebars in an attempt to find bars that align my wrists. A 15 degree sweep eases the discomfort but they still were not quite spot on. 20 degrees may be the sweet spot but the more sweep the closer the bar is and I'm already sitting upright. All my weight is now down through the saddle so that starts to ache after a bit. If I have a stem any longer it will effect the steering. Despite the sweep improving the wrist alignment I still found I wanted to rest my hand above the bar rather than hold it. This caused the nerve to be pinched and a shooting sensation down to the fingers when pulling the brakes. All sorts of difficulties with flat bars.


    Road bikes in general are quietly brilliant. All day riding in complete comfort with minimal effort.
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