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Advice on buying first bike (plus hypermobile joints?)

melimeli Posts: 7
edited March 2017 in Road beginners
Hi!

I have only ridden a bike a couple of times in my childhood when borrowing a friend's bike (I'm pretty terrible at it) but I really want to start to cycle now I'm 22 and I have to rely on public transport. I live in the suburbs of a town and I would just use it to cycle down to town, around and back (about 2-3 miles) and then maybe use it to cycle through cities at a later date.

I have no idea what type of bicycle to get, I was hoping to buy one quite cheap as it's my first ever bicycle, but I could probably go up to £350 at a push (I know it's not a great budget). I also have very hypermobile joints so I wondered if something like a beach/town cruiser would be best as it puts less pressure on the knees?

Any advice would be great, thank you!!

Posts

  • bbrapbbrap Posts: 610
    The advice for bikes in that price range always seems to come back to Decathlon https://www.decathlon.co.uk/C-10829-bikes if buying new, or a secondhand model if you know what you are looking for. Given the distances you are talking about a hybrid would probably suit unless you definitely want drop handlebars.
    Regarding your loose joints, any bike will to an extent put pressure through your knee joints, Whatever the bike you will be turning the pedals and the movement will be pretty similar (recumbents excluded), the amount of stress will depend on a number of factors, e.g. what gear you are in, how heavy the bike (plus you) is, going up/down hill, how you have it set up etc etc.
    The cruiser style you talked about tend to be quite heavy, so not ideal but given the distances could work for you. My advice would be to pop into a local bike shop and sit on a few styles to see what feels right. Given you are just pootling about almost anything will work and not damage your joints. If anything the cycling will tighten them up as muscles strengthen over time.
    Rose Xeon CDX 3100, Ultegra Di2 disc (nice weather)
    Ribble Gran Fondo, Campagnolo Centaur (winter bike)
    Van Raam 'O' Pair
    Land Rover (really nasty weather :lol: )
  • melimeli Posts: 7
    bbrap wrote:
    The advice for bikes in that price range always seems to come back to Decathlon https://www.decathlon.co.uk/C-10829-bikes if buying new, or a secondhand model if you know what you are looking for. Given the distances you are talking about a hybrid would probably suit unless you definitely want drop handlebars.
    Regarding your loose joints, any bike will to an extent put pressure through your knee joints, Whatever the bike you will be turning the pedals and the movement will be pretty similar (recumbents excluded), the amount of stress will depend on a number of factors, e.g. what gear you are in, how heavy the bike (plus you) is, going up/down hill, how you have it set up etc etc.
    The cruiser style you talked about tend to be quite heavy, so not ideal but given the distances could work for you. My advice would be to pop into a local bike shop and sit on a few styles to see what feels right. Given you are just pootling about almost anything will work and not damage your joints. If anything the cycling will tighten them up as muscles strengthen over time.

    Thank you!! I was just looking at that site, do you think the Hoprider 520 Women's City Hybrid Bike would work?

    I will travel to the nearest city to have a look in a couple of bike shops to try them out :D

    I'm about 110lbs and 5'7 so I think I would need quite a lightweight bike for the time being. Thanks for the info about the joints - I did read that cycling is a good way to build muscle to help support my joints more, like you said!
  • bbrapbbrap Posts: 610
    I would say the Hoprider 300 would be a better bet. The 520 has a suspension fork which to be fair is probably overkill for the sort of distance and type of riding you will be doing. And the 24 vs 21 gears will probably make no difference whatsoever. You are however an excellent weight for a cyclist which means you can drop the tyre pressures a little and be really comfy.
    Rose Xeon CDX 3100, Ultegra Di2 disc (nice weather)
    Ribble Gran Fondo, Campagnolo Centaur (winter bike)
    Van Raam 'O' Pair
    Land Rover (really nasty weather :lol: )
  • £350 doesn't get you much these days, unfortunately. My sound advice is... If your budget is only £350 then buy second hand, from Gumtree or http://www.findthatbike.co.uk
    You'll get a much better deal buying second hand, component wise. There's something seriously flawed with the bike if it's only a few £100 brand new, you just can't make a good bike that cheap. The biggest example is for all you mountain bikers... You can't get a good full suspension mountain bike for a £100 in a supermarket, all those components cost money to make.

    If you get a good quality bike you're happy and confident with, then you will want to cycle more.
    "The Prince of Wales is now the King of France" - Calton Kirby
  • melimeli Posts: 7
    £350 doesn't get you much these days, unfortunately. My sound advice is... If your budget is only £350 then buy second hand, from Gumtree or http://www.findthatbike.co.uk
    You'll get a much better deal buying second hand, component wise. There's something seriously flawed with the bike if it's only a few £100 brand new, you just can't make a good bike that cheap. The biggest example is for all you mountain bikers... You can't get a good full suspension mountain bike for a £100 in a supermarket, all those components cost money to make.

    If you get a good quality bike you're happy and confident with, then you will want to cycle more.

    What would you suggest as a good brand new bicycle, for the best price? :D
  • melimeli Posts: 7
    bbrap wrote:
    I would say the Hoprider 300 would be a better bet. The 520 has a suspension fork which to be fair is probably overkill for the sort of distance and type of riding you will be doing. And the 24 vs 21 gears will probably make no difference whatsoever. You are however an excellent weight for a cyclist which means you can drop the tyre pressures a little and be really comfy.

    Thank you, I didn't know I could drop the tire pressure, I'll remember that!
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
  • tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 4,021
    Cycling is a good exercise for your knees. I was waiting for an operation on my knee and got told cycling was a good exercise to do. Meant i was still able to commute 7 miles each way and got me out at the weekends. It's to do with the lack of twisting with cycling, which you can get with walking/running the doctor told me.

    It may be that you need a more uptight position if hyper mobility is an issue. A good bike shop should be able to give you options if you find position is an issue.

    I hate to say it due to people's bad experiences with them, but halfords might have something. Voodoo is a kind of house brand which gives good value for money. Just you might need it serviced elsewhere before riding. Halfords has a bad reputation for setting up bikes. They also do carrera bikes which are cheap but decent value for that money. You'll not get much but it could be serviceable until you can save up for something better. Bear in mind you might find the first bike isn't right and have to get another one later on.
  • SalsaSalsa Posts: 753
    It's a good starter bike Meli, if you liked the style and position it puts you in I would pay the extra £70 and get the bike it's based on which is the Subway. That has better brakes/gears and rear wheel for not a lot more money.
    http://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/h ... ybrid-bike
  • melimeli Posts: 7
    Thank you all once again - I ended up finding a Raleigh Loxley bike at my local Halfords, the last one in the sale for £170 instead of £300, and it felt comfortable for my joints! http://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/h ... ybrid-bike

    Can't wait to start cycling!! :D
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