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Chain lock or D-lock??

londoncommuterlondoncommuter Posts: 1,550
edited January 2017 in Road buying advice
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  • If only carrying one, then the d-lock as long as you understand how best to position it. Possibly even 2 d-locks (or 1 and a chain) if you work in a high-risk area. If you haven't seen them already, have a browse of these threads -

    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/144109/

    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/177217/

    I use the highly recommended Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini. Weighs a million tons and expensive, but I like my work hack.
  • Also consider your anchor point. Mine won't take a d lock. I've got a big d lock but i have one position on the bike rack I can use it. If the space is taken I've got a backup cable lock. I know they're useless but I hope in vain something is better than nothing although perhaps not with cable locks.

    I've switched to a Hiplock chain. It's not got a bigger internal diameter but it works in more than one space on the rack. It's a busy bike shed/rack so I prefer the chain.

    PS ignore manufacturers security grade and look at sold secure rating. Bronze, silver or gold. It's what any insurance company will request if you tag your bike insurance onto your house insurance. It means more than the various ratings of different brands.
  • davidofdavidof Posts: 2,371
    How you lock up your bike is vital. If someone can get leverage then the lock can be bolt croppered. Chains are easier to get into a position where you can cut them.

    Someone with a lock picker tool can pick them pretty quickly too.

    https://youtu.be/GiJ3DzW_tII

    My son bought an electric one of ebay, amazing what it can open.
  • davidof wrote:
    How you lock up your bike is vital. If someone can get leverage then the lock can be bolt croppered. Chains are easier to get into a position where you can cut them.

    Someone with a lock picker tool can pick them pretty quickly too.

    https://youtu.be/GiJ3DzW_tII

    My son bought an electric one of ebay, amazing what it can open.

    Blimey, that's depressing! I suppose it did take him a little while but why would you risk an angle grinder when you could silently do that in only a few seconds more. Maybe I'll borrow a Brompton...
  • No bike is truly safe if a well equipped thief decides they want it. However, making your bike better secured than the ones around it is a good idea. If your commuter is remotely desirable (and bearing in mind the most nicked bike in London is the Spec Sirrus) it might be worth getting a cheap but functional rat bike to use for the next few months, sell it on afterwards.
  • But if you can't use a d lock due to anchor point then chain is best alternative.

    AFAIK a gold rated chain is considered as good as a gold rated d lock to the insurance companies. Since any lock can be beaten insurance is the best way to make sure you do not lose out if/when your bike gets nicked. If it insists on a gold rated lock then you need to use one. It is irrelevant which gold rated lock you use to the insurance company just that you use it to secure your bike to a suitable anchor.

    One more point there's some serious chain locks out there. Praxis locks IIRC come in as very secure. 15mm links in some with locks as good as any d lock. Even thicker links for motorbikes i think. Supposedly some of their chain links can beat any battery powered disc cutters and take significant time for petrol powered disc cutters. The only trouble is they're not exactly portable. Leave at work?
  • andy9964andy9964 Posts: 930

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    I use one of those, with the 7ft Kryptonite cable to tie up the wheels. Used it for around 3 years without issue
  • photonic69photonic69 Posts: 1,052
    If you are always using the same rack of bike stands at work can you not leave your locks attached to the stands so that you don't have to carry them on your commute? If that particular stand is taken you can always move them to where your bike is to be secured. That way you can use 2 or even 3 locks to secure your bike without having to cart them around.
    Just an idea.
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