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What to do cycling a blind bend

Gouldy-89Gouldy-89 Posts: 49
edited March 2017 in Road beginners
So I have recently started cycling with the SO and have leant to deal with the usual naivete of other road users (oncoming cars flashing when we're two abreast and no impediment on them, motorbike overtaking within and inch on a dual carriageway) but I recently had a close call with a car on a blind bend and wondered what I should do in the future as it is part of my usual route.

I was going up hill round a right hand blind bend, the usual 1mish from the verge to avoid the roadside censored , when a car came up behind me and started to overtake to my utter disbelief. Well as luck would have it a car came round the other side and suddenly there was not enough road for the three of us. The cars bonnet was just level with my front wheel and rather than break, put their foot down. Luckily I had the foresight to swerve onto the verge when I heard the engine rev and the oncoming car slammed their breaks on as less than a second later my original stretch of road was occupied by the car nearly colliding with the one in front as well as me.

I was wondering whether next time I should move to the middle of my side of the road to further discourage a blind overtake, stay tight to the edge or something else?
Thanks :)

Posts

  • I tend to hold my position a metre or so from the kerb/verge etc. Sensible drivers (which to be fair is the majority) will be discouraged from overtaking anyway but not allowing them more space to pass helps as well. Personally I don't move to the centre of the lane. Idiots who will overtake on a blind bend will likely do so regardless of your position so IMO it is safer to be left side away from any possible collision between two vehicles.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I would move out further if its not safe to overtake. It will make most people think twice.

    If an idiot does try it then you've some space to deal with the consequences.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    As soon as you hear them moving over to overtake in a stupid place drift out a bit to make them think twice. Most will drop back.

    Obviously the odd idiot won't, and you will probably die, but such is life.
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  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Or death.
  • hsiaolchsiaolc Posts: 492
    First you slow down and be very aware of the car or any car that's coming up next to you. Once you can see over the bend just a bit then guage to see if the car is going to go long side you and will give you room or if not then slow down further to let the car go pass you.

    Or like you said just take the middle of the road.

    But it seems like you've got enough intuition about other car drivers to know better and can anticipate their next move.

    So I think you will do fine.
  • bondurantbondurant Posts: 857
    cooldad wrote:
    As soon as you hear them moving over to overtake in a stupid place drift out a bit to make them think twice. Most will drop back.

    Obviously the odd idiot won't, and you will probably die, but such is life.

    Hahaha!
  • Gouldy-89 wrote:
    So I have recently started cycling with the SO and have leant to deal with the usual naivete of other road users (oncoming cars flashing when we're two abreast and no impediment on them, motorbike overtaking within and inch on a dual carriageway) but I recently had a close call with a car on a blind bend and wondered what I should do in the future as it is part of my usual route.

    I was going up hill round a right hand blind bend, the usual 1mish from the verge to avoid the roadside censored , when a car came up behind me and started to overtake to my utter disbelief. Well as luck would have it a car came round the other side and suddenly there was not enough road for the three of us. The cars bonnet was just level with my front wheel and rather than break, put their foot down. Luckily I had the foresight to swerve onto the verge when I heard the engine rev and the oncoming car slammed their breaks on as less than a second later my original stretch of road was occupied by the car nearly colliding with the one in front as well as me.

    I was wondering whether next time I should move to the middle of my side of the road to further discourage a blind overtake, stay tight to the edge or something else?
    Thanks :)

    Stick to the dual carriageways and use crossing slip roads as interval training. If it does go wrong at least it will be over quickly.
  • HillNoHillNo Posts: 6
    Hey guys, that's you long time riders, what's your opinion on if one was to stay well to the left in a blind bend as when I go through one that's what I do. At least I feel the cars who don't see me coming from behind won't suddenly be pouncing on me in the middle of the lane or even a little to the inside (towards centre of road). There are single A roads that are narrow and I'd rather just ride very very defensively there on a blind bend. What's your thoughts about riding this way. Acceptable? I can't justify to myself going to the middle if it's a true blind bend and you get some real idiots that decide to push the acc in a bend. Not my cup of tea. Thoughts lads?
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,337
    Generally, on a blind LH corner, I'd want to be as near to the centre of the road as possible:

    1. It stops drivers from trying a blind overtake (like the OP's example)
    2. It gives you the best possible view around the corner so that you can see hazards earlier
    3. It makes you the most visible to vehicles both behind you and coming the other way - giving them the most time to respond.

    RH blind bends are more tricky because for "1" you want to be over to the right, and for "2" and "3" over to the left. I tend to stick to the 1m position.
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  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    By staying to the extreme left you'll be reducing the amount of time the driver has to see you.

    There's lots of debris left there too.

    I don't think it is a good strategy. You want to be seen and make motorists think before overtaking.
  • Defensive riding is the key. See the hazard early and command the piece of road you need to make your manoeuvre safely. If the vehicle behind has to wait a few seconds tough luck. Just take the usual two finger salute on the chin and enjoy the rest of your ride.
  • kajjalkajjal Posts: 3,380
    As above defensive riding to keep everyone safe.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    I move out. If dont want a motorist to overtake me I will plonk myself in a position where they cant without risk of death.

    I generally find road position takes care of most numpties.
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  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    #1 rule is if an overtaking car has to choose between a head on collision and swiping left, taking you out - they will always choose the latter.

    So yep - move out. Make them think twice before overtaking, ideally decide not to and if they do anyway you have somewhere to swerve. And if they do try to overtake, you could slow down a bit and let them complete the manoevre more quickly.

    If you keep far over to the left, next to the verge, thats even worse - they will try to squeeze through when there is oncoming traffic, even if there isnt enough room - you are tempting them to do it.
  • fudgeyfudgey Posts: 854
    Assume everyone is trying to kill you. Thats how i ride and take whatever position i feel most 'safe'
    But you will always get people that just dont give a censored and will go for gaps that arnt there.
    My winter bike is exactly the same as my summer bike,,, but dirty...
  • clickrumbleclickrumble Posts: 304
    I move out. If dont want a motorist to overtake me I will plonk myself in a position where they cant without risk of death.

    I generally find road position takes care of most numpties.

    This is what I do. It takes a bit of nerve when you first start but once you get used to it it will keep you safer. If I've held someone up for longer than the usual motorists patience lasts (about 5 secs) I might even give a wave of thanks when I move in to let them go past.
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