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New bike geometry

ColinakmcColinakmc Posts: 10
edited December 2016 in MTB buying advice
It seems about time to replace my ten year old Kona Dawg (too short and steep for me, it's chucked me off too many times, and it occurs to me I don't ride as much because I don't get on with the bike) but I'm puzzled by review references to "aggro" geometry etc. It looks to me like a Whyte 901/905 or Bird Zero would do what I'd like it to (wild trails/ adventure trips, bit of trail centre red with black tinges)?but then I look at the Trek Superfly or Marin Nail Trail 7 which also attract the aggro label, but have 2 or 3 degrees more head angle.
I'm too old to be a speed freak, I want a bike that'll feel confident even on hectic ground. Help!

Posts

  • Maybe I need to ask my question better - does anyone know why 29ers have less slack head angles than 27.5's? I like the idea of the bigger easy rolling 29's but not sure about the steeper frame angles...

    Thing about the Bird Zero (like the Canyon Granf Canyon) is that in Scotland I can't even sit on it before committing.... I can rent a 905 for the day at Glentress and going to do that soon but just not sure what else to compare it to.
  • kajjalkajjal Posts: 3,380
    I would be careful about buying a bike unless you have ridden it or something similar. Test ride a variety of bikes to give you an idea.

    On very similar bikes 29ers roll better over the trail and in my experience also grip better in the climbs. My 26er which is also an xc hardtail is more maneuverable, accelerates faster but you get bounced around more by the trail. As i have a fast, smooth xc style of riding mainly on natural trails with the occasional red run i prefer the 29er.

    Ignore the marketing bs and work out which style of bike suits you and where you ride the best. My 20 year old 26er xc hardtail with v brakes has been up on mountain trails a few times this year and handles it fine with its 50mm elastomer forks.
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    Colinakmc wrote:
    Maybe I need to ask my question better - does anyone know why 29ers have less slack head angles than 27.5's? I like the idea of the bigger easy rolling 29's but not sure about the steeper frame angles...

    Thing about the Bird Zero (like the Canyon Granf Canyon) is that in Scotland I can't even sit on it before committing.... I can rent a 905 for the day at Glentress and going to do that soon but just not sure what else to compare it to.

    29 for XC and going up hills, 26.5 for trails and going downhills, hence different geo. Altho 29 trails and DH bikes are becoming more popular.
  • POAHPOAH Posts: 3,369
    Colinakmc wrote:

    Thing about the Bird Zero (like the Canyon Granf Canyon) is that in Scotland I can't even sit on it before committing.... I can rent a 905 for the day at Glentress and going to do that soon but just not sure what else to compare it to.

    my bro in law bought a bird with out sitting on it, I bought my bikes without sitting on them.
  • Slacker head angle makes the front wheel more stable on descents, but also harder to steer, which is why these bikes will have a shorter stem and wider bars. 29ers are more stable due to the size of the wheel alone, so they can get away with steeper head angles even on descents. 29ers are less nimble as is and sometimes require some forceful persuasion, so lowering the angle could be counterproductive.
    Besides, 29ers are often made as unspecialised all-rounders aiming to please the XC crowd, who need the bike to be fast and climb well.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Super slack 29ers are becoming more common but only really at higher prices.
    Because of the extra wheel and fork flex in 29ers you need a nice stiff fork and wheels which pushes up the price.
    The On One Parkwood is decent value but that fork has all the rigidity of a wet noodle. Stick on a Rockshox Pike and it'll be good.
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