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  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    fenix wrote:
    To be fair though - without people taking a salary and working hard - you'd not get the funds.

    Not many of us can afford to work for nothing - and if the job is done right - the salaries should be a tiny part of the fund raising. This will be audited and anyone can see the reports online.

    Organisation always costs - we know this.
    We also know the more you raise the higher your salary will be, the commercialisation of Charity. Personally, I think there should be fewer charities and they should be far more regulated in how they can raise money to stop the 'holiday' or 'trip of a lifetime' events that most people who contribute to them don't know/realise how much is going to third parties
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    coriordan wrote:
    Kinda like government and all public spending for that matter?

    Pay peanuts and get monkeys....
    bit of a sweeping statement?
    Plenty of Monkeys running big companies
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    There are a LOT of charities - and there must be a huge overlap. So many charities = much duplication or organisation.

    I'm wary of a lot of these unknown charities - especially all of these collection bags that you get posted through the door - and usually for troops charities that I don't know ? Very odd. In the bin they go.
  • debelidebeli Posts: 582
    There has been some disarmingly blunt comment on here to the OP. However, there is an extent to which advertising one's own altruism and getting a jolly out of it can be wearisome to the solicited donor.

    I was for years a door-to-door fundraiser for Christian Ai d. I'm not a Christian myself, but I quite like what they do. I stopped only when the abuse I occasionally elicited made me want to reply in kind. I still feel guilty when Christian Aid week comes round and I know nobody else has taken over 'my' roads in our town.

    I also used to do sponsored bike rides with my kids when they were younger. It was not to raise money, but to let them have a spin out in a larger group with no pressure. The Anthony Nolan Trust used to do rides all over the country and the distances suited us very well when the kiddies were little.

    That is the sort of thing I sponsor people for..... I would be disinclined to sponsor even a close friend to ride to Paris and catch the rugby and maybe slip a few quid to charity. I do not think I am particularly mean or cynical.... but there is giving and giving. And some giving smells slightly like taking.

    Have a fun ride and well done for highlighting the work of the charity, but there are things one should pay for oneself and there is a moment when altruism is not all it at first appears to be.
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,479
    dinyull wrote:
    Effort and reward, says Tom Bell, who raised money for the air ambulance by cycling 350 miles in a week and paid all expenses himself.
    "I'm self-employed, so I lost money. I trained for months.
    "I'll sponsor someone if there's sacrifice.
    "I wouldn't sponsor a mountaineer to climb Everest - but I'd sponsor a lorry driver."

    50 miles a day. Trained for months. Fark off.

    I think your missing the point. He took on the challenge as a novice, so training for months was required. Look at his comment on climbing everest. Seems a reasonable attitude to me.
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,962
    mrfpb wrote:
    dinyull wrote:
    Effort and reward, says Tom Bell, who raised money for the air ambulance by cycling 350 miles in a week and paid all expenses himself.
    "I'm self-employed, so I lost money. I trained for months.
    "I'll sponsor someone if there's sacrifice.
    "I wouldn't sponsor a mountaineer to climb Everest - but I'd sponsor a lorry driver."

    50 miles a day. Trained for months. Fark off.

    I think your missing the point. He took on the challenge as a novice, so training for months was required. Look at his comment on climbing everest. Seems a reasonable attitude to me.

    Aside from medical conditions and/or being extremely unfit (ie. massively overweight), anyone can cycle 50 miles a day for 7 days. Could do it in blocks of 10 miles as slowly as you wanted with minimal training.

    7 people have died on Everest this year alone - Everest to a mountineer isn't a foregone conclusion. You can't compare 350 miles in 7 days to Everest.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    bye
  • dinyull wrote:
    mrfpb wrote:
    dinyull wrote:
    Effort and reward, says Tom Bell, who raised money for the air ambulance by cycling 350 miles in a week and paid all expenses himself.
    "I'm self-employed, so I lost money. I trained for months.
    "I'll sponsor someone if there's sacrifice.
    "I wouldn't sponsor a mountaineer to climb Everest - but I'd sponsor a lorry driver."

    50 miles a day. Trained for months. Fark off.

    I think your missing the point. He took on the challenge as a novice, so training for months was required. Look at his comment on climbing everest. Seems a reasonable attitude to me.

    Aside from medical conditions and/or being extremely unfit (ie. massively overweight), anyone can cycle 50 miles a day for 7 days. Could do it in blocks of 10 miles as slowly as you wanted with minimal training.

    7 people have died on Everest this year alone - Everest to a mountineer isn't a foregone conclusion. You can't compare 350 miles in 7 days to Everest.

    I started cycling in April. I wasn't particularly fit, but I was able to cycle 60-80 km reasonably soon (within three weeks or so). Not so sure I could have done it seven days in a row though.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    Holdey wrote:
    bye :cry:
    Nothing personal, hope it's given you a different insight into what you ask of people or makes you think twice before asking family and friends to donate via a second, third, fourth and fifth party before it gets to the deserving cause
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,747
    Thick Mike wrote:
    dinyull wrote:
    mrfpb wrote:
    dinyull wrote:
    Effort and reward, says Tom Bell, who raised money for the air ambulance by cycling 350 miles in a week and paid all expenses himself.
    "I'm self-employed, so I lost money. I trained for months.
    "I'll sponsor someone if there's sacrifice.
    "I wouldn't sponsor a mountaineer to climb Everest - but I'd sponsor a lorry driver."

    50 miles a day. Trained for months. Fark off.

    I think your missing the point. He took on the challenge as a novice, so training for months was required. Look at his comment on climbing everest. Seems a reasonable attitude to me.

    Aside from medical conditions and/or being extremely unfit (ie. massively overweight), anyone can cycle 50 miles a day for 7 days. Could do it in blocks of 10 miles as slowly as you wanted with minimal training.

    7 people have died on Everest this year alone - Everest to a mountineer isn't a foregone conclusion. You can't compare 350 miles in 7 days to Everest.

    I started cycling in April. I wasn't particularly fit, but I was able to cycle 60-80 km reasonably soon (within three weeks or so). Not so sure I could have done it seven days in a row though.
    Same here, in fact I'm still not up to your distance yet thanks to repetition of the injury i'm trying to use cycling to recover from. It's precisely this type of cycling snobbery that puts some people off the sport/activity. not everyone gets on a bike to go as fast/high/far as they can!
    I'm using the L2B as an incentive for my recovery, but also as a challenge and a way of raising funds for 2 worthwhile charities i care about. The 56 miles would be a walk in the park for some here, it's going to kill me, but I WILL do it!
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,962
    How is it snobbery?

    I'm not talking about bashing out a 2 1/2 hour 50 mile ride a day. Or even a century every other day.

    Riding 50 miles at 10 mph with a 30 min breather/break between 10 mile spells would add up to 7.5 hours a day. An average working day.

    I think most people could manage that. Whether they'd really want to or not is another question - but's it's very achievable.
  • fat daddyfat daddy Posts: 2,632
    not sure my censored could manage it ..... everything else would be fine though

    I think I need to harden my butt up .... martial artists punch sand and wood to toughen their hands up ... I wonder if a similar thing can be done for my censored ?

    anyone got wood for my censored ?
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,747
    It's quite posibly a massive achievement for the guy in the article. You know nothing about him.
    Assuming that everyone is capable of certain things just because you deem it to be easy
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,479
    Tashman wrote:
    Same here, in fact I'm still not up to your distance yet thanks to repetition of the injury i'm trying to use cycling to recover from. It's precisely this type of cycling snobbery that puts some people off the sport/activity. not everyone gets on a bike to go as fast/high/far as they can!
    I'm using the L2B as an incentive for my recovery, but also as a challenge and a way of raising funds for 2 worthwhile charities i care about. The 56 miles would be a walk in the park for some here, it's going to kill me, but I WILL do it!

    Search the term "Ditchling Beacon" on this site to get some good advice on L2B. Good luck with it. I found a cheapish leather saddle that suited me well, though it took a while to break in. (It was a Charge saddle, but I don't know if they still make them)
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,962
    Fair enough, I don't know the bloke - he could have medical conditions etc.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/vgrPhwRvgf4Gb4XkM0NXXB/the-rickshaw-challenge-2016
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,747
    mrfpb wrote:
    Tashman wrote:
    Same here, in fact I'm still not up to your distance yet thanks to repetition of the injury i'm trying to use cycling to recover from. It's precisely this type of cycling snobbery that puts some people off the sport/activity. not everyone gets on a bike to go as fast/high/far as they can!
    I'm using the L2B as an incentive for my recovery, but also as a challenge and a way of raising funds for 2 worthwhile charities i care about. The 56 miles would be a walk in the park for some here, it's going to kill me, but I WILL do it!

    Search the term "Ditchling Beacon" on this site to get some good advice on L2B. Good luck with it. I found a cheapish leather saddle that suited me well, though it took a while to break in. (It was a Charge saddle, but I don't know if they still make them)
    Thanks, I know it well as it's only 10 miles from home so I'm well aware of the challenge and often see people flying, grinding, walking up if I'm heading that way. Thaks for the advice on the saddle, Mine seems fine currently but i may think differently as i grow the mileage :D
  • priorypriory Posts: 743
    I did a number of charity rides when my children were at school.
    before each one for a few weeks people who saw me at work were given a leaflet which said '' i intend to ride 100miles on sunday in an event organised for xx charity.I am expected to take some money for the charity. i will pay all my expenses and entry fee and all money donated goes direct to the charity, whether I complete the ride or not. If you would like to support that charity please speak to our receptionist.'' As the event was organised by the school it was clear there were no payments by the charity for the fundraising or organisation of the ride .
    Interestingly one year I added ''for example 50p'', but that resulted in a very slow uptake until I removed it. the staff said that specifying an amount made people feel more pressurised and they refused to give. I put it in because I felt that a few people were giving more than they could easily afford, but clearly folk want to decide for themselves.
    Raleigh Eclipse, , Dahon Jetstream XP, Raleigh Banana, Dawes super galaxy, Raleigh Clubman

    http://s189.photobucket.com/albums/z122 ... =slideshow
  • Holdey wrote:
    bye :cry:

    Damn I missed it. I love a nice flounce :cry:
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • I've raised a fair bit of money (ca. £40k) for cancer charities

    Jimmy Saville raised £40 million for charities

    Lance Armstrong over $500 million

    .....and Kevin Keegan raised sweet FA
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • Cheerio now
  • Holdey wrote:
    bye :cry:

    Damn I missed it. I love a nice flounce :cry:
    It was a splendid one. I expect he needs a holiday now. It's just a question of who pays for it...
  • sniper68sniper68 Posts: 2,899
    Holdey wrote:
    bye :cry:

    Damn I missed it. I love a nice flounce :cry:
    It was a splendid one. I expect he needs a holiday now. It's just a question of who pays for it...

    I saw the original request last year and then this.I was going to comment but it looks as though he's spat his dummy out now and buggered off :roll:
  • ibbo68 wrote:
    Holdey wrote:
    bye :cry:

    Damn I missed it. I love a nice flounce :cry:
    It was a splendid one. I expect he needs a holiday now. It's just a question of who pays for it...

    I saw the original request last year and then this.I was going to comment but it looks as though he's spat his dummy out now and buggered off :roll:
    The best bit was his saying that all the money went directly to the charity... omitting to mention that the charity then paid for hotels, transport, food, and tickets to the rugby. And then expecting a smooth ride here. Charities, even the most worthy ones, don't do themselves any favours when they go for this sort of scheme. There's a fundamental dishonesty about it.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Don't think the OP gets forums.
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    Looking at the OP's JustGiving page, I cant see that they have donated anything themself. Shows how much they think of the charity...
  • andy9964andy9964 Posts: 930
    ibbo68 wrote:
    I saw the original request last year and then this.I was going to comment but it looks as though he's spat his dummy out now and buggered off :roll:
    No need to worry, wait another 12 months.............
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,713
    fat daddy wrote:
    not sure my ars* could manage it ..... everything else would be fine though

    I think I need to harden my butt up .... martial artists punch sand and wood to toughen their hands up ... I wonder if a similar thing can be done for my ars* ?

    anyone got wood for my ars* ?

    you want wood in your censored ?

    you might be on the wrong forum
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    Holdey wrote:
    bye :cry:

    Damn I missed it. I love a nice flounce :cry:
    It was a splendid one. I expect he needs a holiday now. It's just a question of who pays for it...
    Class :)
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    apreading wrote:
    Looking at the OP's JustGiving page, I cant see that they have donated anything themself. Shows how much they think of the charity...

    And that's the whole point with these adventure fund raising events. The very first donation on there should be by the event entrant covering the whole cost of entering. At least that way, everything else raised will go to paying the salaries and expenses of the charity. Oh and about 9% to the charities aims.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,928
    I think the problem though is that many events are (understandably) coy about exactly how much of the money raised is used to fund the event rather than go to the charity. In the case of 'sponsored' events where a charity has paid for association with an event, most donors would be dismayed to see that most of the money left over from the organisers goes to the charity...to pay off the cash paid by the charity to the organisers in the first place!
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