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Worth getting road specific shoes for road cycling?

neiglassneiglass Posts: 10
edited November 2016 in Road beginners
okay so i do a lot of racing on mtb but i'm kind of a noob on the road, and just recently bought a trek emonda to train/do long rides on. I only have mtb shoes though, so should i buy road specific shoes and pedals? And aside from the aesthetics, what are the benefits?
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  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,867
    If running spd,s just carry on using them. Plastic cleats wear out quickly if you walk on them unlike metal spd,s Ideal low budget road shoe is shimano RT32 suitable for spd,s
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • Mad_MalxMad_Malx Posts: 4,119
    Lots of us start out with spd pedals and never feel the need to move to the spd-sl for road.

    There are some 'road' spd pedals (A530), but m520 work fine too. I have the former on my best bike but can't tell much difference.
    Shoes I would say yes, to be more sleek and less clunky. Shimano touring use spd (rather than spd-sl) fittings so you can walk in them. I prefer my rt82s over previous mtb spd shoes.
    Cheaper rt32s ok too, but don't fit me so snugly.
  • sniper68sniper68 Posts: 2,899
    The soles on Road specific shoes tend to be stiffer and the shoes less bulky.Better transfer of power is one benefit(not sure how average joe will notice this).
    The cleats do wear and can snap,as I found out 30miles into a 100mile Sportive last year,so I now carry cleat covers.
    I still use MTB shoes/pedals on my Winter/CX bike but I'm a total convert to Road shoes on my "best" bike.
  • rpatonrpaton Posts: 15
    Are stiff soles good?

    Sore knees, aches and pains and...
    https://www.bikejames.com/strength/why- ... at-pedals/

    Are clipless pedals better than flats?
    More power, more efficient?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNedIJBZpgM

    https://www.bikejames.com/strength/why- ... oke-power/
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 14,204
    It is worthwhile getting road SPD shoes IMO, but mostly on looks over mtb versions, presuming stiff soles. Post count check......
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • sniper68sniper68 Posts: 2,899
    rpaton wrote:
    Are stiff soles good?

    Sore knees, aches and pains and...
    https://www.bikejames.com/strength/why- ... at-pedals/

    Are clipless pedals better than flats?
    More power, more efficient?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNedIJBZpgM

    https://www.bikejames.com/strength/why- ... oke-power/

    Why post two links to MTB sites?
    MTB and Road riding are totally different :roll:
    I've ridden MTB for 30 years both Flats and clipless and that's a debate that'll never go away but on the road I'd always use clipless.
    As for sore knees,aches and pains?I'm pushing 50 and have none 8)
    Poor set up of any kind can result in sore knee,aches and pains.
    pblakeney wrote:
    It is worthwhile getting road SPD shoes IMO, but mostly on looks over mtb versions, presuming stiff soles. Post count check......

    Mmm just noticed :wink:
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Just put your mtb pedals and shoes on for the winter. They tend to be warmer than most Road shoes. See how you get on and maybe think of changing for the summer?
  • daniel_bdaniel_b Posts: 8,785
    I have carbon soled MTB shoes, and carbon soled road shoes, they are identical in terms of stifness.

    I rode M520's for a good few years on my roadbike, but after occasionally getting slight discomfort on longer rides, decided to try Look pedals and treadless road shoes (This was when I was building my first road bike up from scratch) - it is now a much nicer experience, and no foot discomfort at all.

    Downsides are the cleats wearing, where as for me the metal ones just go on and on and on and on.
    You can slightly alleviate this by using cleat covers for cafe stops, but whichever foot you put down for traffic light stops will always wear down.
    Some cleats have tougher make up, so do not break down as easily though - Look do one called a Grip cleat I think possibly.

    If I had not had any foot pain, I would probably still be on M520's, or a slightly lighter equivalent.
    Having changed now, I would never go back, but would still use SPD if I had to commute.
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 14,204
    pblakeney wrote:
    Post count check......
    8
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • ibbo68 wrote:
    Better transfer of power is one benefit(not sure how average joe will notice this).

    Good MTB race shoes are very similar to road racing shoes. Comparing like for like, there's no performance difference.

    Both systems work - it's marketing that separates the two. SPD pedals are excellent all rounders.
  • Both systems work - it's marketing that separates the two.
    And cost. Shimano must sort of hate having a system on sale that is cheap, and both works and lasts for 1000s and 1000s of miles with no maintenance/sales, with pedals and cleats for under £20. If only they could persuade everyone to go to a more expensive system...
  • kirkeekirkee Posts: 369
    Another consideration for going to road pedals for your road bike could depend on your fore / aft cleat positioning, as I have found. Most race geometry road bikes have short wheelbases. I use an 'aft' position on all my shoes.
    I experienced bad toe overlap issues when Id tried my Time Atacs on my road bike with my Shimano mtb shoes. I ride with the cleat in furthest back slot on my shoes for both mtb and commuter. On my road bike I use Speedplays on road specific shoes with rear extender plates to get a more mid - foot ish position that mimicks my mtb set up. It doesnt give me as bad toe overlap as the Atacs do. Maybe the road shoes do not allow as much rear placement as the mtb shoes do.
    Also the smaller your feet the less likely toe overlap will be.
    Caveat - I buy and ride cheap, however, I reserve the right to advise on expensive kit that I have never actually used and possibly never will
  • Jerry185Jerry185 Posts: 143
    Check the weight of both, lighter shoes will have a better effect on your performance.

    I read threads on here arguing this both ways (the shoe is fixed so it makes no difference versus you're moving a weight up and down thousands of times so it does).

    Then I changed my 720 gram clipless plastic soled shoes to 460 gram carbon soled shoes. Noticed the difference straightaway; felt like I wasn't even wearing shoes and knocked 14% off my PB for the first long hill.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    Worth it but not a big deal if you have other things to spend the money on.

    I came from MTB and much prefer road shoes for road bike.
    I wish I had converted sooner.

    Have both, use both.
    Try not to listen to people who have never used road, and swear by MTB :roll:

    I would not bother with touring shoes, they are primarily designed to be walked in first, and cycle in second.

    If you plan to walk a bit, keep the MTB shoes.
    If you plan to walk a lot, get touring shoes ............. or even better, just take a pair of trainers in your pannier bag.
  • I rode road for a couple of years on MTB pedals and shoes and pretty much changed over because I needed a birthday present idea.

    Do they make a difference in performance to me? Probably not.

    Do they feel lighter in the summer months? Yes

    At the moment I'm using road shoes with overshoes but if the rain gets worse and I keep riding I'll probably swap the systems over so I can use my Gore Tex MTB boots and pedals as they are so much warmer for the deep winter months.

    See, both options have benefits.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Jerry185 wrote:

    Then I changed my 720 gram clipless plastic soled shoes to 460 gram carbon soled shoes. Noticed the difference straightaway; felt like I wasn't even wearing shoes and knocked 14% off my PB for the first long hill.

    14% ?? Tailwind perhaps ?
  • There is a substantial weight saving to be had, I think my combo lost about 5 or 600 grams in total but I didn't see a huge improvement going anywhere.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Does anyone get faster if they forget their water bottle ? Thats 750gr easy weight savings ! ;-)
  • Jerry185 wrote:
    Check the weight of both, lighter shoes will have a better effect on your performance.

    I read threads on here arguing this both ways (the shoe is fixed so it makes no difference versus you're moving a weight up and down thousands of times so it does).

    Then I changed my 720 gram clipless plastic soled shoes to 460 gram carbon soled shoes. Noticed the difference straightaway; felt like I wasn't even wearing shoes and knocked 14% off my PB for the first long hill.

    Lighter shoes are nice (another reason to use laces), but if there's a pair of shoes that can increase pbs by that much, you probably want to keep it a secret.
  • Jerry185Jerry185 Posts: 143
    fenix wrote:
    Jerry185 wrote:

    Then I changed my 720 gram clipless plastic soled shoes to 460 gram carbon soled shoes. Noticed the difference straightaway; felt like I wasn't even wearing shoes and knocked 14% off my PB for the first long hill.

    14% ?? Tailwind perhaps ?

    No tailwind and PR's now all over the place. Average speed up by c 1 mph
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I think you're just trying harder or getting fitter then. Weight on the shoes really won't make a huge difference. Remember that the weight is balanced by the other shoe - like a funicular railway - so it doesn't matter too much.
  • Jerry185Jerry185 Posts: 143
    Maybe, Fenix; everyday's a school day. 18 months ago I thought you just got a half decent bike and rode it. 60 miles? Just ride it harder. Right?
    Lots of things have improved but, honestly, the shoes were an instantaneous Dorothy effect and a quantum leap (OK, a smallish step, but vertical) in my stats.
    Get what you're saying from the 'doesn't matter' camp, but I'm a convert to the lighter shoes.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I'm sure its all going to help.

    For me my best upgrade was a pair of Oakley Racing Jackets. I rode like an Armstrong domestique all day on the first ride with them !
  • Jerry185 wrote:
    Maybe, Fenix; everyday's a school day. 18 months ago I thought you just got a half decent bike and rode it. 60 miles? Just ride it harder. Right?
    Lots of things have improved but, honestly, the shoes were an instantaneous Dorothy effect and a quantum leap (OK, a smallish step, but vertical) in my stats.
    Get what you're saying from the 'doesn't matter' camp, but I'm a convert to the lighter shoes.

    It's great that you like your new shoes, but there's very little difference between this and 'red bikes are faster'.
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    It's great that you like your new shoes, but there's very little difference between this and 'red bikes are faster'.

    Cough - b****cks - cough....

    Losing 250gms and having stiffer soles (with reduced stack height) will make a certain degree of difference - simple physics mandates this when climbing. Yes it's not huge but it is there nonetheless and somewhat patronising to say otherwise.
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • svetty wrote:
    It's great that you like your new shoes, but there's very little difference between this and 'red bikes are faster'.

    Cough - b****cks - cough....

    Losing 250gms and having stiffer soles (with reduced stack height) will make a certain degree of difference - simple physics mandates this when climbing. Yes it's not huge but it is there nonetheless and somewhat patronising to say otherwise.

    There are myriad things that can make 'a certain degree of difference' - putting it in such vague terms is of almost no usefulness at all, particularly in real world cycling. The fact is that changing from one pair of cycling shoes to another pair of cycling shoes is not going to increase speed by 1mph.
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    svetty wrote:
    It's great that you like your new shoes, but there's very little difference between this and 'red bikes are faster'.

    Cough - b****cks - cough....

    Losing 250gms and having stiffer soles (with reduced stack height) will make a certain degree of difference - simple physics mandates this when climbing. Yes it's not huge but it is there nonetheless and somewhat patronising to say otherwise.

    There are myriad things that can make 'a certain degree of difference' - putting it in such vague terms is of almost no usefulness at all, particularly in real world cycling. The fact is that changing from one pair of cycling shoes to another pair of cycling shoes is not going to increase speed by 1mph.

    Agreed but that's not what you said, you made a condescending comment suggesting that the OP was deluding himself and that the difference was equivalent to a 100% placebo effect. I simply pointed out that this wasn't in fact correct....
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • svetty wrote:
    svetty wrote:
    It's great that you like your new shoes, but there's very little difference between this and 'red bikes are faster'.

    Cough - b****cks - cough....

    Losing 250gms and having stiffer soles (with reduced stack height) will make a certain degree of difference - simple physics mandates this when climbing. Yes it's not huge but it is there nonetheless and somewhat patronising to say otherwise.

    There are myriad things that can make 'a certain degree of difference' - putting it in such vague terms is of almost no usefulness at all, particularly in real world cycling. The fact is that changing from one pair of cycling shoes to another pair of cycling shoes is not going to increase speed by 1mph.

    Agreed but that's not what you said, you made a condescending comment suggesting that the OP was deluding himself and that the difference was equivalent to a 100% placebo effect. I simply pointed out that this wasn't in fact correct....

    Read it again. 'Very little difference between' and 'equivalent to' are not synonymous.
  • Haven't ridden in MTB shoes for years, but from what I remember, I wouldn't fancy sprining in them in a crit. They wouldn't feel secure enough.

    For commuting or club runs would probably be fine. Depends on the type of riding you do.
  • Haven't ridden in MTB shoes for years, but from what I remember, I wouldn't fancy sprining in them in a crit. They wouldn't feel secure enough.

    For commuting or club runs would probably be fine. Depends on the type of riding you do.

    There's a fair bit of resistance available on SPDs; I've never felt the need to crank it up all the way. I don't race on them, but I use toestraps for hillclimbs on fixed, and would want to regardless of which clipless system I had on.
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