Forum home Road cycling forum The cake stop

Killer on the loose

ballysmateballysmate Posts: 13,699
edited October 2016 in The cake stop
and its name is Prostate Cancer.

This isn't a plea for sponsorship or any money, but a plea for those of you of a certain age to drag your ar5e to the quacks for a simple blood test. (PSA) This disease kills over 10,000 men each year in the UK but is one of the most treatable cancers if diagnosed early.

I was diagnosed 5 years ago, just short of my 50th birthday with an advanced aggressive form. Thankfully I am still here and in pretty good shape.
I had none of the classic symptoms and it was my missus who made me go to the docs to be checked. As my doc put it, "Nagging wives save lives".

This cancer is usually thought of as an old man's disease but it can and does strike men in their 40s, It appears to be more aggressive in the younger patients.

I see Ben Stiller was diagnosed at 48 with no symptoms, just like me.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/10 ... te-cancer/

I know that there are many on here who have suffered cancer much worse than mine and this isn't a plea for sympathy. In fact, those of you who may have been minded to post "Good luck" or similar messages, don't bother. Use the time instead to phone to make a doctors appointment for a blood test.

Don't worry about the finger up the bum check :shock: , that doesn't come until later. :lol:

This post may be more suited to the health forum and admin may move it. It was posted here as this is where I thought it would get the most exposure.

Posts

  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    ballysmate wrote:
    I had none of the classic symptoms and it was my missus who made me go to the docs to be checked. As my doc put it, "Nagging wives save lives".

    I'm pretty much doomed. I have no wife, nagging or otherwise, and whenever I go to the docs with some complaint he looks at me, gives me a half smile and says "you're getting old". I'm 49 ffs and fitter than most 30 year olds and healthier than a lot of them and now I find I am more reluctant than ever to go to the docs.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 22,300 Lives Here
    Have to agree with Bally, unfortunately a good friend of mine is terminal with it at 53. He is hoping to hang on until his son turns 18 next year. Desperately sad. I know a few people that have had it and come out the other side, it is treatable if caught early enough. Unfortunately it looks like my mate was diagnosed too late.
    ETA: I'll nag you Rolf, but I'm not doing any other wifely duties for you.
  • andcpandcp Posts: 652
    Hi Bally,

    Thanks for sharing. If you didn't have any of the classic symptoms, what was the trigger that caused your wife to persuade you to go to the docs?

    Andy
    "It must be true, it's on the internet" - Winston Churchill
  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,259
    You mention the blood test for PSA, (Prostate specific antigen?) but I found that getting it isn't as easy as going to your docs unfortunately.

    I have high blood pressure, and so I have to go for a yearly check and blood tests. I asked them to add the PSA to the suite of test they doing at the time but they wouldn't.

    Also want to know what made you go to the docs if there were no symptoms (and the reception you got)


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 39,485
    I'm lucky as my annual company medical includes the blood test for PSA. Fortunately nothing but I also check myself from time to time.

    Even better, rather than have your other half nag you about it, get them to help do the checking :)
    Whippet
    Bruiser
    Panzer
    Commuter

    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 13,699
    Capt Slog wrote:
    You mention the blood test for PSA, (Prostate specific antigen?) but I found that getting it isn't as easy as going to your docs unfortunately.

    I have high blood pressure, and so I have to go for a yearly check and blood tests. I asked them to add the PSA to the suite of test they doing at the time but they wouldn't.

    Also want to know what made you go to the docs if there were no symptoms (and the reception you got)

    I didnt have the classic symptoms of upin the night for a p1ss or poor flow.
    I used to watch the Trinations on a Sat morning while drinking endless coffee. Of course this meant endless trips to the toilet. My missus took this as a sign and nagged and nagged. I went to the docs and explained I was pissing 3 times an hour. Gave me a test. The rest is history.
    Psa 70
    Tumor 3b
    Gleason 9
    Lucky boy.

    Being diagnosed changed my life but not as much as not being diagnosed would have. :wink:
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 46,579 Lives Here
    Sorry to hear that Bally.

    I may think you're a number of 4 letter words but wouldn't want to wish that on anyone. Get well soon (if you haven't already).
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 13,699
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    I'm lucky as my annual company medical includes the blood test for PSA. Fortunately nothing but I also check myself from time to time.

    Even better, rather than have your other half nag you about it, get them to help do the checking :)

    That's coz you like the finger up the bum. :lol:
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 13,699
    Sorry to hear that Bally.

    I may think you're a number of 4 letter words but wouldn't want to wish that on anyone. Get well soon (if you haven't already).

    Thanks Rick, hopefully I will be OK. It's looking good unlike VN's poor mate.

    But spread the word to anyone in late 40s onwards to get checked.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,939
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    but I also check myself from time to time.)

    I feel Queeezy :(
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • trek_dantrek_dan Posts: 1,366
    Lots of journals suggest that dairy consumption significantly increases risk of prostate cancer.
  • WheelspinnerWheelspinner Posts: 4,641
    Found out after he'd passed away that my old man had a minor benign tumour for many years, but they'd never treated it, just left it and monitored for a while.

    PSA test in blood samples is pretty standard here. There's also a national screening program (free) where after age 50 or 55 I think you can get a kit sent out by Government, and you send back a stool sample for analysis. They will tell you if any follow up is necessary with your doc. Sounds yuk, but is a good alternative for the doctor-averse men out there (and there are LOADS of them).
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    but I also check myself from time to time.)

    I feel Queeezy :(

    That's exactly what you are supposed to be doing........
    Faster than a tent.......
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,939
    Rolf F wrote:
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    but I also check myself from time to time.)

    I feel Queeezy :(

    That's exactly what you are supposed to be doing........
    has he got a small part in Snow White?
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 39,485
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    but I also check myself from time to time.)

    I feel Queeezy :(
    Who's Queezy? :)

    Seriously, a quick of your knackers is not difficult. Although I think that's testicular rather than prostate. Doh.
    Whippet
    Bruiser
    Panzer
    Commuter

    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 22,300 Lives Here
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Although I think that's testicular rather than prostate. Doh.
    We just figured you enjoyed a digital jacksy.
  • xdocxdoc Posts: 331
    Testing for prostate cancer is not straight forward, there are risks/benefits that have to be considered.
    There are many causes for a raised PSA, and this may lead to an unnecessary invasive test such as a prostate biopsy which can have complications.
    PSA can be normal in some one with prostate cancer.
    Many prostate cancers are very slow growing and may never cause problems, post mortem examinations in elderly men frequently will show the presence of prostate cancer which was not apparent when they were alive.
    Experts in the field still 'argue' over what is the best management/treatment, particularly in the early stages.
    Some men may be over treated, and suffer complications/side effects for treatment that may be of no benefit.

    That's just a very brief synopsis of some of the issues.

    Before having a PSA test I would urge any one to discuss fully with their GP, avoid private/free testing at work/golf clubs etc without proper counselling/discussion.

    To those above who have been diagnosed, then the prognosis is usually excellent and I wish you well.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 13,699
    xdoc wrote:
    Testing for prostate cancer is not straight forward, there are risks/benefits that have to be considered.
    There are many causes for a raised PSA, and this may lead to an unnecessary invasive test such as a prostate biopsy which can have complications.
    PSA can be normal in some one with prostate cancer.
    Many prostate cancers are very slow growing and may never cause problems, post mortem examinations in elderly men frequently will show the presence of prostate cancer which was not apparent when they were alive.
    Experts in the field still 'argue' over what is the best management/treatment, particularly in the early stages.
    Some men may be over treated, and suffer complications/side effects for treatment that may be of no benefit.

    That's just a very brief synopsis of some of the issues.

    Before having a PSA test I would urge any one to discuss fully with their GP, avoid private/free testing at work/golf clubs etc without proper counselling/discussion.

    To those above who have been diagnosed, then the prognosis is usually excellent and I wish you well.

    From your username, I assume you are, or once were a doctor, and as such respect your view. But the fact remains that without my doc giving me this test, the only way I would be conversing with anyone on here today would be through a spiritualist.
    It would appear that the Aussies, according to Wheelspinner, have a testing programme, as do some other countries, so perhaps the benefit of early detection outweigh the risk of a false positive result.

    As I said earlier. I went to the docs and he elected to test me, in fact he ran several tests.
    The next day, I received a call at work telling me to get my ar5e into the surgery asap.
    The following day, I went to the surgery and saw a different doc. He told me my PSA was 70 (this meant nothing to me at the time). During his consultation he learnt that I cycled and he stated that cycling had probably caused the, what I subsequently learned, extremely high result, and that I should stay off the bike for 6 weeks or so to see if the result came down. He was however obliged to refer me as I had hit a trigger point for referral. He did a digital rectal examination :shock: and said that both halves of my prostate felt smooth and normal.
    During my subsequent appointment with an urologist I was again examined. I mentioned the conversation with my GP regarding cycling and she was aghast. She said that she could feel that my prostate wasn't normal, feeling 'nobbly' and although she couldn't say with certainty without biopsy, she was pretty sure I had cancer. And so it proved.

    So Xdoc, as much as I respect your medical opinion, I would still urge anyone in the at risk age group to seek the test. By all means discuss the ramifications with your GP, but bear in mind he may be a quack like the doctor I saw when getting my test results.
  • xdocxdoc Posts: 331
    ballysmate wrote:
    xdoc wrote:
    Testing for prostate cancer is not straight forward, there are risks/benefits that have to be considered.
    There are many causes for a raised PSA, and this may lead to an unnecessary invasive test such as a prostate biopsy which can have complications.
    PSA can be normal in some one with prostate cancer.
    Many prostate cancers are very slow growing and may never cause problems, post mortem examinations in elderly men frequently will show the presence of prostate cancer which was not apparent when they were alive.
    Experts in the field still 'argue' over what is the best management/treatment, particularly in the early stages.
    Some men may be over treated, and suffer complications/side effects for treatment that may be of no benefit.

    That's just a very brief synopsis of some of the issues.

    Before having a PSA test I would urge any one to discuss fully with their GP, avoid private/free testing at work/golf clubs etc without proper counselling/discussion.

    To those above who have been diagnosed, then the prognosis is usually excellent and I wish you well.

    From your username, I assume you are, or once were a doctor, and as such respect your view. But the fact remains that without my doc giving me this test, the only way I would be conversing with anyone on here today would be through a spiritualist.
    It would appear that the Aussies, according to Wheelspinner, have a testing programme, as do some other countries, so perhaps the benefit of early detection outweigh the risk of a false positive result.

    As I said earlier. I went to the docs and he elected to test me, in fact he ran several tests.
    The next day, I received a call at work telling me to get my ar5e into the surgery asap.
    The following day, I went to the surgery and saw a different doc. He told me my PSA was 70 (this meant nothing to me at the time). During his consultation he learnt that I cycled and he stated that cycling had probably caused the, what I subsequently learned, extremely high result, and that I should stay off the bike for 6 weeks or so to see if the result came down. He was however obliged to refer me as I had hit a trigger point for referral. He did a digital rectal examination :shock: and said that both halves of my prostate felt smooth and normal.
    During my subsequent appointment with an urologist I was again examined. I mentioned the conversation with my GP regarding cycling and she was aghast. She said that she could feel that my prostate wasn't normal, feeling 'nobbly' and although she couldn't say with certainty without biopsy, she was pretty sure I had cancer. And so it proved.

    So Xdoc, as much as I respect your medical opinion, I would still urge anyone in the at risk age group to seek the test. By all means discuss the ramifications with your GP, but bear in mind he may be a quack like the doctor I saw when getting my test results.

    Hi Ballysmate.

    Yes I am a medic, not in the field of prostate cancer so don't pretend to be an expert, but I am deeply involved with a well known cancer screening programme, which similarly has potential risks/benefits.

    I fully appreciate where you are coming from, and can understand your enthusiasm for encouraging other men to be tested.
    I just wished to clarify that nothing in medicine is straight forward or black and white and people should be fully aware of any potential negatives.
    It may well be that if studies can prove that a national prostate screening programme will produce an overall reduction in mortality, and it is 'affordable', then testing of men over a certain age by checking their PSA may be introduced. As far as I am aware however, in the UK at least, the jury is still 'out'.

    And I would encourage any man of a certain age with any urinary symptoms to consult their GP.

    What I particularly wished men to be aware of, and I have heard this from my brother who is a GP, that some unscrupulous private companies go around offering PSA tests for a small 'fee' at golf clubs etc. It would appear that men are offered the test with little or no 'counselling', and if the PSA is found to be raised it is left to the GP to 'pick up the pieces'.

    I am aged 56, and at present I would not consider having my PSA checked, rightly or wrongly who knows!

    Best wishes, xdoc
  • I am on blood thinning tablets due to a couple of DVT incidents so get regular blood tests. One aspect of the blood tests is PSA. The PSA tests were routinely normal until one spiked last year showing high levels.

    The NHS hospital where I attend quickly called me in and gave me the "fingering" which showed a slightly enlarged Prostate, not uncommon for people of my age (60). They talked it through with me and for peace of mind recommended the biopsy.

    I have to say I was dreading it but the anticipation was actually worse than the procedure and a week later I was given the all clear. The spike in the blood test, they explained, could have been something as simple as an infection.

    I feel relieved that it is all over and would rather have an all clear (although as explained even a biopsy is not always conclusive) than be worrying about what may or may not be happening "down there"

    I have been in and out of our local NHS hospital with various things this past couple of years (it comes with age) and I have to say despite the downer some people have on the NHS I cannot compliment them enough, the nurses, doctors etc always put you at ease, always have a smile for you (despite what may be going on in their lives) and this attitude takes away a lot of the worry for the patients. If only the receptionists could do likewise.
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