Forum home Commuter cycling forum Commuting chat

Don't be a d!ck. Point your lights down.

135

Posts

  • I'll just leave this here: DSCF2588_zpsbifmgjzz.jpg

    100 of the finest German luxes, all hitting the road at the same time.
  • I'll just leave this here: DSCF2588_zpsbifmgjzz.jpg

    100 of the finest German luxes, all hitting the road at the same time.
    Reinforcing the need for stvzo style lighting regs
    I can't remember if that was a safe ride or a b&m ?

    http://en.bumm.de/innovations/headlight ... rison.html
    Intent on Cycling Commuting on a budget, but keep on breaking/crashing/finding nice stuff to buy.
    Bike 1 (Broken) - Bike 2(Borked) - Bike 3(broken spokes) - Bike 4( Needs Work) - Bike 5 (in bits) - Bike 6* ...
  • jds_1981jds_1981 Posts: 1,858
    I'll just leave this here: DSCF2588_zpsbifmgjzz.jpg

    100 of the finest German luxes, all hitting the road at the same time.

    That looks quite reasonable/impressive (although it is very bright so might still be a bit much for someone coming the other way along an unlit road.)

    You know though that if that was the only option, people would think "Hmm, I can't illuminate the people/cars coming the other way, I'll just point this up a bit" :?
    FCN 9 || FCN 5
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,337
    jds_1981 wrote:

    That looks quite reasonable/impressive (although it is very bright so might still be a bit much for someone coming the other way along an unlit road.)

    To my point above, you don't know the camera settings to know how bright it really is. But that does illustrate my point: with cameras, the aperture setting and the sensitivity of the sensor makes the difference and the same goes with your eyes.

    (ETA - the sky in the pic is quite blue against the trees - suggests, given how bright the foreground is, that it's quite a "lightened" picture).
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • jds_1981 wrote:

    That looks quite reasonable/impressive (although it is very bright so might still be a bit much for someone coming the other way along an unlit road.)

    To my point above, you don't know the camera settings to know how bright it really is. But that does illustrate my point: with cameras, the aperture setting and the sensitivity of the sensor makes the difference and the same goes with your eyes.

    (ETA - the sky in the pic is quite blue against the trees - suggests, given how bright the foreground is, that it's quite a "lightened" picture).

    It was the 'blue hour' after sunset but before real darkness - straight off what is admittedly a very good camera. Bought the light late in the season last year and that was as dark as it got by the time I reached the unlit part of my commute.

    As for someone coming the other way, it's a very hard cut-off at the top of the beam, so perhaps if they were riding a 'bent it may dazzle them, but I don't think it'd be a problem for most on flat roads, if I'm cresting a hill, perhaps.
  • jds_1981 wrote:

    That looks quite reasonable/impressive (although it is very bright so might still be a bit much for someone coming the other way along an unlit road.)

    To my point above, you don't know the camera settings to know how bright it really is. But that does illustrate my point: with cameras, the aperture setting and the sensitivity of the sensor makes the difference and the same goes with your eyes.

    (ETA - the sky in the pic is quite blue against the trees - suggests, given how bright the foreground is, that it's quite a "lightened" picture).

    1/5th, f/2 and ISO6400 according to the EXIF data, the sky is pretty much exactly how I'd expect it to look for those exposure settings in the blue hour (or blue 10 minutes as it more typically is). That's definitely a lot of light to throw out from a bike!
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,337
    That's definitely a lot of light to throw out from a bike!

    Yeah - it's better than the headlights of my Mercedes
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 20,049
    Should have bought a BMW
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • rhodrichrhodrich Posts: 867
    So, after sounding all smug about my StVZO approved light, it looks like its becoming increasingly unreliable, by turning off when I go over bumps.

    Please can I have a recommendation for an economical, UK road legal front light, with decent shaped light output that I can buy in the UK?
    1938 Hobbs Tandem
    1956 Carlton Flyer Path/Track
    1960 Mercian Superlight Track
    1974 Pete Luxton Path/Track*
    1980 Harry Hall
    1986 Dawes Galaxy
    1988 Jack Taylor Tourer
    1988 Pearson
    1989 Condor
    1993 Dawes Hybrid
    2016 Ridley Helium SL
    *Currently on this
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    Rhodrich wrote:
    So, after sounding all smug about my StVZO approved light, it looks like its becoming increasingly unreliable, by turning off when I go over bumps.

    Please can I have a recommendation for an economical, UK road legal front light, with decent shaped light output that I can buy in the UK?
    The Garmin Varia front looks like a decent bet, shame it costs one meeeeeelion dollars.

    My saferide appears to have had some water ingress and the button was misbehaving on the last ride. Fortunately when Rose had them cheap I bought two of them.
  • rhodrichrhodrich Posts: 867
    It's a great shame they don't sell SafeRides any longer. I've got a dynamo version on my tourer, and it's fantastic.
    1938 Hobbs Tandem
    1956 Carlton Flyer Path/Track
    1960 Mercian Superlight Track
    1974 Pete Luxton Path/Track*
    1980 Harry Hall
    1986 Dawes Galaxy
    1988 Jack Taylor Tourer
    1988 Pearson
    1989 Condor
    1993 Dawes Hybrid
    2016 Ridley Helium SL
    *Currently on this
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    You never used to get these dazzling problems with the good old Ever Ready Night Riders of the 80's...

    http://simple-living-in-suffolk.co.uk/tag/nightrider/
  • Fenix wrote:
    You never used to get these dazzling problems with the good old Ever Ready Night Riders of the 80's...

    http://simple-living-in-suffolk.co.uk/tag/nightrider/
    Actually you did. Out in the sticks with those you got absolutely blinded by oncoming car mainbeam headlights as they were blissfully unaware that you exists. :lol:
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I'll just leave this here: DSCF2588_zpsbifmgjzz.jpg

    100 of the finest German luxes, all hitting the road at the same time.

    Am I right in thinking that's a dynamo powered B&M of some description? Curious to know which model and which dynohub?

    I have the battery powered Ixon IQ Premium which does 80 Lux and is generally pretty good for my quiet rural bimbling round Newmarket after dark. In theory it should do 4 hrs plus on a set of 4 AAs, but never been out that long at night so I don't know...

    But the other night I'd cocked up on the battery charging front and went out with nearly depleted ones in the light and 4 similarly discharged spares in my pocket :roll: . Cue 2 miles properly illuminated, a battery swap by the light of my Cateye rear, another 2 miles with lights followed by 15 miles on greatly reduced power. Just about enough to navigate by because I know the roads well, but I must have been virtually invisible to oncoming cars because I lost count of the number who blinded me with headlights on full beam. That rarely happens when the thing's on full power. But the whole thing got me thinking about the simplicity / fit and forget reliability of a dynamo setup...
  • keef66 wrote:
    I'll just leave this here: DSCF2588_zpsbifmgjzz.jpg

    100 of the finest German luxes, all hitting the road at the same time.

    Am I right in thinking that's a dynamo powered B&M of some description? Curious to know which model and which dynohub?

    I have the battery powered Ixon IQ Premium which does 80 Lux and is generally pretty good for my quiet rural bimbling round Newmarket after dark. In theory it should do 4 hrs plus on a set of 4 AAs, but never been out that long at night so I don't know...

    But the other night I'd cocked up on the battery charging front and went out with nearly depleted ones in the light and 4 similarly discharged spares in my pocket :roll: . Cue 2 miles properly illuminated, a battery swap by the light of my Cateye rear, another 2 miles with lights followed by 15 miles on greatly reduced power. Just about enough to navigate by because I know the roads well, but I must have been virtually invisible to oncoming cars because I lost count of the number who blinded me with headlights on full beam. That rarely happens when the thing's on full power. But the whole thing got me thinking about the simplicity / fit and forget reliability of a dynamo setup...

    I'm tempted by a front dynamo hub, like you I'm using the Ixon IQ Premium, used with Eneloop pro's, though I almost have an OCD when it comes to keeping things charged.
  • tincamantincaman Posts: 508
    jamesco wrote:
    Another thing to consider is a freznel lens if your light is unshaped.
    Are there Fresnel lenses that can be fitted to small bicycle lights? I've got these on the front, for example. The Fresnel lenses I could find had a diameter of 29-39mm and were made to repace lenses screwed in with a bezel, rather than one piece plastic.
    Buy these, you can easily cut to the shape you need.
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll? ... _920wt_175
    The material sticks to the lens without any adhesive
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    mudcovered wrote:
    Fenix wrote:
    You never used to get these dazzling problems with the good old Ever Ready Night Riders of the 80's...

    http://simple-living-in-suffolk.co.uk/tag/nightrider/
    Actually you did. Out in the sticks with those you got absolutely blinded by oncoming car mainbeam headlights as they were blissfully unaware that you exists. :lol:

    That's very true !

    I used to ride with a MTB helmet and peak on - slathered in reflectives and lowering your head was the only way to not be blinded and hope that the reflectives got them to take the mainbeams off. It really doesn't happen as much any more since we got proper lights.
  • keef66 wrote:
    I'll just leave this here: DSCF2588_zpsbifmgjzz.jpg

    100 of the finest German luxes, all hitting the road at the same time.

    Am I right in thinking that's a dynamo powered B&M of some description? Curious to know which model and which dynohub?

    I have the battery powered Ixon IQ Premium which does 80 Lux and is generally pretty good for my quiet rural bimbling round Newmarket after dark. In theory it should do 4 hrs plus on a set of 4 AAs, but never been out that long at night so I don't know...

    But the other night I'd cocked up on the battery charging front and went out with nearly depleted ones in the light and 4 similarly discharged spares in my pocket :roll: . Cue 2 miles properly illuminated, a battery swap by the light of my Cateye rear, another 2 miles with lights followed by 15 miles on greatly reduced power. Just about enough to navigate by because I know the roads well, but I must have been virtually invisible to oncoming cars because I lost count of the number who blinded me with headlights on full beam. That rarely happens when the thing's on full power. But the whole thing got me thinking about the simplicity / fit and forget reliability of a dynamo setup...

    I'm tempted by a front dynamo hub, like you I'm using the Ixon IQ Premium, used with Eneloop pro's, though I almost have an OCD when it comes to keeping things charged.

    It's the 100 lux IQ-X from Busch & Müller. I power it using a SP dynamo. Quite the best setup I've had/seen. Sadly the fork crown mount rattled itself to death, though, so I had to use one from a regular Cyo.
  • Fenix wrote:
    mudcovered wrote:
    Fenix wrote:
    You never used to get these dazzling problems with the good old Ever Ready Night Riders of the 80's...

    http://simple-living-in-suffolk.co.uk/tag/nightrider/
    Actually you did. Out in the sticks with those you got absolutely blinded by oncoming car mainbeam headlights as they were blissfully unaware that you exists. :lol:

    That's very true !

    I used to ride with a MTB helmet and peak on - slathered in reflectives and lowering your head was the only way to not be blinded and hope that the reflectives got them to take the mainbeams off. It really doesn't happen as much any more since we got proper lights.

    When MTBing in winter and dark and crossing the odd road/lane get the odd car who doesn't dip, releasing the light (for that sort of use I shield the light) normally forces them into diping very quickly!
  • jedsterjedster Posts: 1,717
    It's the 100 lux IQ-X from Busch & Müller. I power it using a SP dynamo.

    Just bought exactly that combination for my new commuter. Have a shimano hub and IQ-CYO 2 (80 lux I think) currently which is already enough for 30mph downhill on unlit roads. This pics above look even better.
  • What's your view of head torches/helmet lights with a gazillion lumens? Had one today riding north on the A6 through Bolton le Sands. You can't dip them, where he.looks he dazzles.

    Sorry if you really need bright attach to your bike with dipped angle or the decent lenses you can get. Then any head mounted light is a duller, to be seen light only. You are not in the mountains at night but in a dull morning on the road. You don't need the bright, directional light like that on your head.

    Anyone got an idea what light it could have been? As bright as a good car headlight, large round light and stuck on the front of the helmet but I couldn't see how it was attached (band or strap?). Reckon a Chinese cheapo ultra bright one,
  • What's your view of head torches/helmet lights with a gazillion lumens? Had one today riding north on the A6 through Bolton le Sands. You can't dip them, where he.looks he dazzles.

    Sorry if you really need bright attach to your bike with dipped angle or the decent lenses you can get. Then any head mounted light is a duller, to be seen light only. You are not in the mountains at night but in a dull morning on the road. You don't need the bright, directional light like that on your head.

    Anyone got an idea what light it could have been? As bright as a good car headlight, large round light and stuck on the front of the helmet but I couldn't see how it was attached (band or strap?). Reckon a Chinese cheapo ultra bright one,

    d*ckheads use these on cable st CS3 each winter...gonna call them out this year. Totally blinds you on a narrow track with a dodgy kerb next to you with peds all around...not a good combo
  • Call them out for me too.

    This guy was a going the other way. He's full Lycra lout and I'm late for work. Even if I wasn't full of a viral infection unable to get much above 10mph without a steep hill assist I doubt I'd catch him up to argue with him.
  • thistle_thistle_ Posts: 6,896
    dhope wrote:
    I've seen a few riders with a white light on the back. Pulled them up on it and was told they wanted to keep drivers guessing. ******* idiots.
    I just popped out for lunch and saw a Renault Clio with red front lights (sidelights/daytime running lights) :roll:
  • pangolinpangolin Posts: 5,260
    jedster wrote:
    It's the 100 lux IQ-X from Busch & Müller. I power it using a SP dynamo.

    Just bought exactly that combination for my new commuter. Have a shimano hub and IQ-CYO 2 (80 lux I think) currently which is already enough for 30mph downhill on unlit roads. This pics above look even better.

    I got the SP dynamo front hub built up with an Archetype rim, and a B+M Cyo Premium light recently from Spa. Really helpful chap on the phone, I ordered on a Monday and received it that Thursday or Friday. Only a couple of hundred miles so far but all good. The light is great.

    This hub: https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/dynamos/black-sp-dynamo-pd8-disc-front-hub-32-hole/

    This light: https://www.rosebikes.com/article/b--m-lumotec-iq-cyo-premium-t--senso-plus-front-headlamp/aid:709237
    Genesis Croix de Fer
    Cube Attain
  • alan_shermanalan_sherman Posts: 1,157
    There were two selfish bedazzlers last night going down the New Kings Road. Don't they realize that by blinding oncoming traffic they are making it more dangerous for everyone? Bloody scooters riders are as bad, I've been known to flick their lights to dipped when at traffic lights before......

    So the question is how do we get the bedazzlers to stop? Beat them to a pulp? Friendly request to dip theri light (if you get a chance to as nicely), or request the police to target all traffic with too-high beams (like they did all traffic jumping reds a couple of years ago)?



    I like the idea of shouting "Don't bedazzle you vajazzle"! But i doubt they would understand what I was talking about.
  • rower63rower63 Posts: 1,991
    In Richmond Park I generally shout "DIP YOUR LIGHT!" as we cross in as loud and as non-offensive way I can. About 25% of the time I get the response "F*ck Off!"
    Dolan Titanium ADX 2016
    Ridley Noah FAST 2013
    Bottecchia/Campagnolo 1990
    Carrera Parva Hybrid 2016
    Hoy Sa Calobra 002 2014 [off duty]
    Storck Absolutist 2011 [off duty]
    http://www.slidingseat.net/cycling/cycling.html
  • BikequinBikequin Posts: 402
    The embankment Superhighway is not much fun for this in the evenings, imho anyone cycling with more than a decent "be seen" light on in Central London is being an inconsiderate c0ckw0mble. One guy going West to East last night probably had enough light for a day/night cricket match!

    If you need more lights the turn them on when you get out into the sticks.
    You'll not see nothing like the mighty Quin.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 20,049
    Maybe this is how ninja riders start
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • rhodrichrhodrich Posts: 867
    So there have been horrendous roadworks on the Portsmouth Road in Kingston, whilst they're doing more work to the 'Dutch' cycle infrastructure. This has meant long queues of traffic, and my actually using the 'cycle lane' to get past these queues.

    The cycle lane is a two way lane, on one side of the road, with a very narrow curb between it and the main carriageway. If you're cycling south, keeping to the left hand side of the cycle lane, you're about 2 feet from cars coming directly towards you in the main carriageway.

    Headlights for cars which drive on the left are designed to dip to the left, with a sharp cut off of the beam to prevent drivers in cars coming the other way being blinded. However, if you're in a cycle lane which is on the 'wrong' side of the road, this means that car headlamps effectively are shining straight at you. This sort of thing is deemed to be so dangerous and unpleasant that RHD cars driving on the continent are required to have beam benders, headlamp stickers, or other headlamp modifications to prevent drivers coming the other way from being dazzled.

    In the meantime, our 'safe' cycling infrastructure puts us directly in a location where such dazzling is unavoidable. Combined with unlit bollards in the middle of the cycle path, ambiguous crossovers with unclear rights of way, and other cyclists riding the other way with million lumen lights pointed straight at you, this makes for a pretty dangerous set of affairs.
    1938 Hobbs Tandem
    1956 Carlton Flyer Path/Track
    1960 Mercian Superlight Track
    1974 Pete Luxton Path/Track*
    1980 Harry Hall
    1986 Dawes Galaxy
    1988 Jack Taylor Tourer
    1988 Pearson
    1989 Condor
    1993 Dawes Hybrid
    2016 Ridley Helium SL
    *Currently on this
Sign In or Register to comment.