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How long will my first bike last?

RedwulfRedwulf Posts: 5
edited April 2017 in MTB beginners
After a bit of advice about a new bike?

I'm pretty much nailed down on a hardtail like a Voodoo Bizango or a Calibre Gauntlet, but there is a little bit of doubt in my mind about whether it would be cheaper in the long run to invest in full sus like the Bossnut.

Assuming I rode it regularly through the winter and into next summer on easy to medium trails, how soon am I likely to need, rather than want a full sus. I'm perhaps falsely assuming that a goodish hardtail will last me 18mths to two years.

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    A goodish hard tail will last you for years. You won't need a FS.

    If you think that you will want a FS in a couple of years then yes it may be worth spending the extra now.
  • fat daddyfat daddy Posts: 2,605
    I have a lovely Meta 5.2 full sus .. yet find myself wanting a hardtail for a lot of the "lesser" trails, where getting the power down efficiently and having a lighter stiffer bike would just be more fun.

    So what ever you get ..... if you get bitten by the bug in a years time you will want the other to complement it :D
  • Thats great thanks.

    Now I just have to decide between the Gauntlet and the Bizango...
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    Redwulf wrote:
    Thats great thanks.

    Now I just have to decide between the Gauntlet and the Bizango...

    Just choose one, doesn't matter which one, both are good bikes
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    My 1987 Specialized Rockhopper is still going, and on original cassette, chainrings, wheels, mechs etc.

    My 1996 Kona Explosif is still going, although most of it has been replaced over the years.

    My girlfriends 1993 Marin Palisades Trail is still going, and I just replaced the orignal tyres last week.

    My 2000 Azonic DS1 is still going, having had various incarnations as a race bike, a 150mm gnarly trail bike, and a 120mm more or less XC bike.

    I could go on.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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    Parktools
  • nasha48nasha48 Posts: 231
    Cooldad, you cant seriously have ridden that Rockhopper much surely in the near 30 years i assume you've had it??!!

    Anyway, ive always thought there's a basic correlation between how much you look after/maintain/replace parts on your bike and how long it lasts. Obviously lots of variables but essentially if you keep on top of the maintenance there's little reason why it shouldn't last you for donkeys. A snapped frame obviously changes things a bit.
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    Nasha48 wrote:
    Cooldad, you cant seriously have ridden that Rockhopper much surely in the near 30 years i assume you've had it??!!

    Anyway, ive always thought there's a basic correlation between how much you look after/maintain/replace parts on your bike and how long it lasts. Obviously lots of variables but essentially if you keep on top of the maintenance there's little reason why it shouldn't last you for donkeys. A snapped frame obviously changes things a bit.

    I got the impression OP wasn't talking about lifespan of the bike more that he believes that as his riding progresses he'll need a FS.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Well he said need, not want, so I assumed he meant wearing out.
    I was just pointing out that with a bit of love and replacing parts that wear, bikes can last a very long time.

    The Rockhopper is a case in point. It's been used a lot, has some rust, some brush painted stays where it was looking a bit manky, and some original Mint Sauce stickers.
    But it's true I haven't used it much the last few years. It's still a usable bike though.

    I have too many really, so busy thinning the fleet down a bit. So they don't always get used as much as they should anymore.

    Also have a 1994 Kona Hahanna that gets used as my daily commuter. Although that has new cranks and cassette.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    I've just retired my 2005 Carrera frame, that did 6500miles commuting in the last 5 and a bit years. That was bought used in 2009.
  • Quote - "I got the impression OP wasn't talking about lifespan of the bike more that he believes that as his riding progresses he'll need a FS."

    Yes, that's pretty much it sorry for the confusion.

    I understand that I can replace pretty much everything other than the Frame and generally improve things and keep the wheels turning with new components, but I'd been led to believe that over time my ability and confidence will grow to the point I'll start to push the bike beyond its capabilities and need something more rugged.

    I guess the question could have been "what can't you do on a hard tail and is that something I'm likely to want to do in the next coulple of years?" which I appreciate is entirely subjective.
  • cooldad wrote:
    My 1987 Specialized Rockhopper is still going, and on original cassette, chainrings, wheels, mechs etc.

    My 1996 Kona Explosif is still going, although most of it has been replaced over the years.

    My girlfriends 1993 Marin Palisades Trail is still going, and I just replaced the orignal tyres last week.

    My 2000 Azonic DS1 is still going, having had various incarnations as a race bike, a 150mm gnarly trail bike, and a 120mm more or less XC bike.

    I could go on.

    I had a Marin palisades trail circa 1996, cost me over £500 at the time :shock:

    I loved it, sold it to my mate who still has it and it's still in great nick; sometimes wish I never sold it, frame was awesome!
  • Thank you everyone for the advice.

    I've gone for the Calibre Gauntlet which having had a quick ride feels like a lot of bike for the money.
  • If no accident, a good hardtail lasts for 3~5 years seems not too difficult.
  • robertpbrobertpb Posts: 1,866
    Well quite a long time, my nearly 9 year old Meta 5.2 is still going strong, my custom built Swallow Cycles rigid MTB which was in service up to 2008 from 1986 is still OK and my 1985 Covent Garden Cycles custom built is still in fine fettle.

    The Swallow has still the original bearings in the wheels which were custom Swallow tandem axles. This bike cost at the time close to £1500.00, but it was built with not many off the shelf parts.
    Now where's that "Get Out of Crash Free Card"
  • musclebeachmusclebeach Posts: 116
    Getting a new bike is such a great feeling, chuffed for you, my £500 Trek did me for alot of years being my first proper MTB! enjoy!
  • I've just bought a hardtail (Rockhopper Pro). Great bike and a big improvement on my older 26" Rockhopper. On certain trails I question my choice of getting a hardtail and not a full suspension, but I know I would also want a hardtail if I had a FS for many of the trails I ride.
    At some point I will get an FS but actually I don't think I made the wrong decision, you get a lot more bang for your buck with a hardtail. And a good solution for making some of those rougher trails a bit more comfortable is to go tubeless and lower your tyre pressure.
    At the end of the day I'm trying to say that at least for me having a hardtail is essential, a full suspension could only be as an addition.
  • OMarkOMark Posts: 23
    It really depends on how serious you get about riding. If you get a decent hardtail, physically the bike will last for years. But in reality, you'll want to upgrade to something better in 2-4 years if you are taking riding more serious.
  • In my case 15-16 years steel hard tail.

    Bought a Trek 950 cromoly hardtail, Rigid forks around 1992-3 ish New,
    rode it daily on average 6-8 miles, early 2008 I found a hairline crack
    on the seat tube, caused by using a plastic seat pole shim in the frame
    for the seat pole,

    consequentially over time this shim became squashed and
    deformed, this aloud for the seat pole to move back and forth,
    the leverage action eventually caused the stress hair line crack.

    Had I stuck with the original seat pole this would still be in use,
    obviously chain rings, wheels chains and the general wear parts
    are replaced.
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