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New Cannondale?

andrewlwoodandrewlwood Posts: 224
edited September 2016 in Road buying advice
I lost the cycling habit a few years back and I'm desperate to find it again. Knowing myself as I do, a new bike is a good way to do it. I've got a 2010 trek alpha 2.3 105 that has quite a few miles on it in the hallway, and I think it's time for an upgrade. Much of my riding will be a 12-mile commute, with shortish (20mi) weekend spins.

So bikes are moving on and I'm weighing up the options at around £1500. I loved my CAAD10 and I'm drawn back to cannondale.

caad12 105 disc?
Caad12 ultegra non-disc
Super six Evo 105?
Synapse 105?

I'm 40; 5'10; and too heavy (120kg - hence the urgency to cycle!). What should I be trying out and looking for? I like the idea of disc brakes but is the non-through axles on the card a real issue? And the weight?

Posts

  • I test rode the synapse and the CAAD12 (in disc). My preference was the CAAD 12 as the Synapse was a bit to relaxed, could be the set up and it felt more forgiving.

    You could spend a fortune and save 3-4kg on a CAAD12 frame and light weight bits, which I have done on my summer project. Myself, I am going to lose the weight off my frame and bits ..... mostly my tummy.
  • Thanks - I'm getting the same feedback from elsewhere. Any thoughts on disc vs calliper (e.g 105 disc vs Ultegra non-disc); and I'm assuming a big difference between a 2010 £1500 bike and a 2016 one?
  • gusm41gusm41 Posts: 92
    I bought the Synapse 105 earlier this year and found the disc brakes were not great for me being also over the 100 kg mark.
    The wheels are also very heavy. Saying that its a very comfortable and fairly quick bike.
    I changed the brakes to Juin tech r1 with a 160 on the rear as well as the front.
  • I like the idea of disc brakes but is the non-through axles on the caad a real issue?

    Yes it is
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • I like the idea of disc brakes but is the non-through axles on the caad a real issue?

    Yes it is
    Thanks - because of safety? Stiffness? Futureproofing? What would you say makes it an issue?
    And
    What would you recommend instead - a non disc CAAD, a super six, or a disc bike from another manufacturer?
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    CAAD12 Ultegra - disc brakes not needed and Ultegra is so much better than 105.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • If you're commuting in the wet then go discs 100%. My bike has hydraulic discs and it's fantastic in the wet (you can also use wider tyres with disc brake bikes which help greatly with grip and comfort)

    I don't believe there's a problem with qr vs thru axle tbh
  • bmxboy10bmxboy10 Posts: 1,917
    My Caad 10 Black Inc Disc is the best all round bike i have ever owned and trust me I've had a few. I am similar to you in terms of "rider profile" lol and my Caad is comfy fast and the disc brakes are defo worth having. Just been out on my rim braked Tarmac and it rained most of the time and I was craving for the wide tyres and disc brakes of my Caad. If the Caad 12 disc is as good as the 10 you will be happy trust me.
  • solboy10 wrote:
    My Caad 10 Black Inc Disc is the best all round bike i have ever owned and trust me I've had a few. I am similar to you in terms of "rider profile" lol and my Caad is comfy fast and the disc brakes are defo worth having. Just been out on my rim braked Tarmac and it rained most of the time and I was craving for the wide tyres and disc brakes of my Caad. If the Caad 12 disc is as good as the 10 you will be happy trust me.

    Brilliant, thank you, that's reassuring and encouraging in equal measure. So as an all rounder and regular (4 season) commuter, you think it's a solid option - better for example than the tarmac comp (seeing as you're a Tarmac owner)?
  • bmxboy10bmxboy10 Posts: 1,917
    Defo and the Tarmac is awsome too. Recently had a condor fratello disc and a van Nicholas mistral and the Caad beats them all seriously. Make sure you get the right size though and if in doubt size down.
  • For 20 mile rides, maybe just service the trek and get riding?
  • For 20 mile rides, maybe just service the trek and get riding?
    well - that's a sensible, head decision of course, but like most people I'm not an entirely rational consumer. There's not much wrong with the bike - needs new tires, a new cassette and chain and a fettle. But there's the heart bit too - I was staring at an on-sale Super Six Ultegra this afternoon after a really enjoyable ride - I've got a bit of money put aside for a 'treat' and I know that shiny things will get me riding more regularly - that's just who I am, sad to say.


    So, still looking for opinions on this!
  • dazz_ni45dazz_ni45 Posts: 468
    I can't comment on the disc v non disc question, but I have a supersix evo hm and a synapse ultegra.

    I love the evo and it just wants to make you go fast, but for a longer day in the saddle I go for the synapse every time. Granted, I get lower back pain which certainly influences the comfort factor but even though the synapse has a more relaxed geometry it is no slouch and there is no tangible difference in speed over a longer ride between it and evo. I have also raced the synapse and again haven't been disadvantaged.

    Basically if I had to chose one bike (with my head) it would be the synapse due to the combination of the comfort and speed.

    I am awaiting delivery of a CAAD12 Ultegra so I will hopefully be able to report back on that.
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 2,183
    I have a CAAD10 105 10 speed and recently added a CAAD12 ultegra rim brake and it's a big step forward. I had a supersix previously and I prefer the CAAD12. As far as brakes are concerned, the ultegra rim brakes along with new pads are a very good rim brake option.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    Let's face it, 120kg is bloody heavy so whatever bike you go for I would recommend that you spend some time ensuring that you ride a bike with the right wheels, something like handbuilts with 32/36 spoke combo as a minimum, wide rim and running decent wide tyres. The best bet would be to talk to the shop prior to purchase so that they can swap the wheels out prior to purchase so that you get a good deal. Failing that, keep some cash back and buy some good wheels off DCR or Cycle Clinic and sell the stock wheels unused, etc.

    If you need motivation to get out and ride then another way to look at it is to get riding on what you have and set a target weight of 100kg. When you reach that you could buy a new bike with racier looking wheels, etc, so maybe a good target for April next year, but only if you hit the mark. That should keep you going in mid January :-)
  • Bobbinogs wrote:
    Let's face it, 120kg is bloody heavy so whatever bike you go for I would recommend that you spend some time ensuring that you ride a bike with the right wheels, something like handbuilts with 32/36 spoke combo as a minimum, wide rim and running decent wide tyres. The best bet would be to talk to the shop prior to purchase so that they can swap the wheels out prior to purchase so that you get a good deal. Failing that, keep some cash back and buy some good wheels off DCR or Cycle Clinic and sell the stock wheels unused, etc.

    If you need motivation to get out and ride then another way to look at it is to get riding on what you have and set a target weight of 100kg. When you reach that you could buy a new bike with racier looking wheels, etc, so maybe a good target for April next year, but only if you hit the mark. That should keep you going in mid January :-)

    Indeed it is heavy, which is part of the reason to get back out on the bike; I've not had problems with wheels for a while though; last time was when I was significantly lighter on my old CAAD9, when spokes kept pinging and I eventually had the wheel rebuilt.

    After realising that I can legitimately put the bike through my own business and save the corporation tax, and finding a good unpublished deal on a current year bike, I've just put down for a Synapse 105 disc - which comes with 28mm tyres as standard. I'll give them a go and see where I end up.

    Tried the CAAD12, which was great - really lively - but the comfort and slightly more go-anywhere nature of the synapse had me sold, plus it was available for a similar price.
    Thanks for your help everyone!
  • You won't regret the choice of the Synapse. Its comfort will encourage you to stay in the saddle for longer, thereby burning more calories.
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