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Wimp out on left hand corners!!

BikeGirlKentBikeGirlKent Posts: 7
edited August 2016 in Road beginners
Evening all....Just after some advice or to be told its common.....Im happy at speed on right hand corners but really flake out of left handers, especially tighter corners...its becoming a real issue! Anyone else had this?? Thanks

Posts

  • nwallacenwallace Posts: 1,465
    Also interested as I do so on Right Hand Corners...
    Do Nellyphants count?

    Commuter: FCN 9
    Cheapo Roadie: FCN 5
    Off Road: FCN 11

    +1 when I don't get round to shaving for x days
  • Frustrating isn't it!! Think its just practise but i really tense up!!
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 6,036
    Main thing is get your technique right - correct technique and it feels safer so you will be less worried and relax more. Two things are get the line right through the corner so don't just stick to the left hand kerb and get your head up and look as far ahead round the corner as you can.

    There is plenty of information on the internet - ignore anyone that mentions counter steering !
    AFC Mercia women - sign for us
  • On a fast left corner I will try to get as much info as I can before I even get to it. First of all I will check behind for any approaching vehicle's from behind, now depending on the observation of no vehicle I will check my right shoulder and pull over to center line to give a better and straight line through the corner and take the corner. Of there is vehicles approaching and depending on speed and distance and also if there is any vehicle approaching from the front I will either get the vehicle from behind in front of me by waving them quickly through now if they don't make their move quickly enough I will take control of the road and set my self up in the command position after doing a shoulder check just in case pull over to the center line and take the corner. Then once safely through the corner let them through and give a wave of thanks for being courteous. The last thing I want is someone passing as I'm taking the corner so by taking control of the situation as much as I can I can take the corner as safely as I can be it either getting any vehicles from behind or making them wait till I'm round the corner safely and letting them pass safely and a wave of thanks we can all carry on with our days
  • slowmartslowmart Posts: 3,944
    Two aspects to consider, first is ability, which partly comes with confidence and increased situational awareness. As for the physical position I'll leave that out the question of hand position on the hoods or drops will just attract the numpties and the correct answer is what's right for you.

    Awareness of the surface, road furniture, junctions and other users are the usual qualifiers. Looking up to see the direction of hedges and street lighting indicate the shape of the oncoming corner. Additionally you can practise using the vanishing point to determine how sharp the corner you're entering is. As you head towards the corner, if the VP moves towards you then the corner ahead is becoming tighter and you'll need to slow down. If the VP moves away from you the corner should be easily ridden. Get this technique sorted and you'll leave most riders behind

    vanishingpoint.jpg


    The second aspect is mental, do you have any inherent physical weakness on your left hand side as the mind naturally protects any perceived weaknesses.

    In both cases increasing your confidence by reading the road better will make you relax and enjoy one of the best bits of cycling.
    “Give a man a fish and feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Teach a man to cycle and he will realize fishing is stupid and boring”

    Desmond Tutu
  • smudgeriismudgerii Posts: 125
    Brilliant post from slowmart.

    One thing I've observed of many cyclists is head position in bends, they don't have their eyes level to the horizon. Instead they have it angled to the 'lean' and are tracking just in front of their own wheel the whole time. I know we need to check road surface, but as a motorcyclist I know that reading the bend and traffic is far more important to my safety and progress so I adopt the same principals in my cycling.
  • nwallacenwallace Posts: 1,465
    Interesting that you mention physical weakness of the left (presumably in relation to the OP) as I do have a weakness on my right. I'll need to deliberatley set up some rides with a variety of right handers as when I think of it all the tougher corners round me are lefts.
    Do Nellyphants count?

    Commuter: FCN 9
    Cheapo Roadie: FCN 5
    Off Road: FCN 11

    +1 when I don't get round to shaving for x days
  • slowmartslowmart Posts: 3,944
    nwallace wrote:
    Interesting that you mention physical weakness of the left (presumably in relation to the OP) as I do have a weakness on my right. I'll need to deliberatley set up some rides with a variety of right handers as when I think of it all the tougher corners round me are lefts.

    If it's a physical weakness you're subconsciously protecting then building your ability in reading corners will help. Take in the relevant information as you approach a corner but be aware of the VP and once this starts to move away get in the gas and look through what's left of the corner. Slow is smooth and smooth is fast.

    Keep on doing this and you'll displace any fear with ability and wanting to nail every corner while dropping your mates. Just ride within your ability and leave plenty of room for error.

    You can learn the VP just by using the same principles in a car.
    “Give a man a fish and feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Teach a man to cycle and he will realize fishing is stupid and boring”

    Desmond Tutu
  • nwallacenwallace Posts: 1,465
    Yeah, I've done LPV driving in the car for a few years, and been trying it on the bike, it really is a mental thing in right handers, first really noticed it on a tight berm on the Laggan lower red years ago and been noticing it as I get considerably faster on the road.

    The other hint of it is my preference for putting my left foot down at junctions even if turning right (which means the bike is banked the wrong way for the turn) and it being first out the pedals; 3 ankle twists on the right foot (all after first noticing my right hand cornering is worse than left) and a weak right shoulder from a PE cricket incident.
    Do Nellyphants count?

    Commuter: FCN 9
    Cheapo Roadie: FCN 5
    Off Road: FCN 11

    +1 when I don't get round to shaving for x days
  • Dan_xzDan_xz Posts: 130
    Could be a hip or spine alignment issue. How is your general posture? Do you find it more difficult looking back over your shoulder left vs right either cycling or walking?
  • me-109me-109 Posts: 1,305
    Stay away from track cycling then!
    :D
  • BrandonABrandonA Posts: 553
    If you ride clockwise more then you will not have to do so many left hand turns.

    Seriously though, this sounds like a case of HTFU
  • “Jij bent niet van suiker gemaakt”
  • nwallacenwallace Posts: 1,465
    :lol:
    Do Nellyphants count?

    Commuter: FCN 9
    Cheapo Roadie: FCN 5
    Off Road: FCN 11

    +1 when I don't get round to shaving for x days
  • PostieJohnPostieJohn Posts: 1,105
    One thing that changed my descending corners was the cranks.

    Naturally I'll make sure the outer crank/pedal was the one facing down, but all rather limply I never really did much with it.

    I now make a conscious effort to apply proper 'force' down on that pedal, that has the effect of planting my bike to the road.
    Couple that with the other great advise, being well prepared, looking far down the road and owning the corner should get you round no problems.
  • Thankyou all so much for your input....incredibly helpful! I put some of this into practise yesterday and found things much better!! Lots more practice and learning to relax but I'm getting there!!
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 6,036
    One other thing - if we are talking about descending I would disagree with Slowmart and recommend using the drops. There may be some individuals who prefer to descend on the hoods and that is fine if it works for them but I would at least try going down hills on the drops - you get better control of the brakes and being able to slow down/stop with control is key to being confident going fast - it also gives you a better grip on the bars if you hit a pothole or rough road surface without having to tense your arms up - a light grip on the hoods is fine until you hit a hole at 40mph.
    AFC Mercia women - sign for us
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