newbie buying advice

danielseward408
danielseward408 Posts: 10
edited December 2016 in Road beginners
Hey guys, I've been getting the itch to go out and buy a road bike for a while now. I am a runner as well but recently I've been getting some pain from the impact so i have been thinking about different activities to keep me going.

My question to you guys is this, I have a short-list of bikes but the spec is boggling. I've done a bit of goggling about things and found some info out but would i notice the difference between a sora groupset or a 105 groupset. i could save £200-£300 on a sora bike. I've been told that the Synapse is a good frame for me hence the slight biased list.

These are the bikes I've been looking at.

* http://paulscycles.co.uk/m7b65s6p6599/C ... -SORA-2016

* http://paulscycles.co.uk/m7b65s6p5261/C ... RIPLE-2013

* http://paulscycles.co.uk/m7b65s6p5460/C ... RIPLE-2014

* http://paulscycles.co.uk/m7b65s6p6600/C ... -DISC-2016

* http://paulscycles.co.uk/m7b65s6p6601/C ... -DISC-2016

Thanks
Dan

Comments

  • You would probably notice a bit of difference between Sora/105 but more important is whether this would have an impact on performance, both the bikes and yours. In truth, it probably won't.

    One thing to think about is longer term. If you get into cycling you will want to upgrade components and ultimately your first bike in the not too distant future. A 105 equipped bike will probably last a bit longer and save you a bit of money in the long run, so you'll have to decide whether it's worth investing more from the outset.

    A lot of forum members will, quite rightly, point out that the most important thing for a first road bike is getting one that fits. I would always recommend going down to a bike shop if you have one close by and getting measured up. They will also be able to give advice on the right bike for you.

    Whatever you do, try not to get too hung up on trying to make the perfect choice with a first bike, you will soon outgrow it and develop a better idea of what you want from a bike with more riding experience. This will quickly lead to bike number 2, then 3,4 etc. :D
  • You would probably notice a bit of difference between Sora/105 but more important is whether this would have an impact on performance, both the bikes and yours. In truth, it probably won't.

    One thing to think about is longer term. If you get into cycling you will want to upgrade components and ultimately your first bike in the not too distant future. A 105 equipped bike will probably last a bit longer and save you a bit of money in the long run, so you'll have to decide whether it's worth investing more from the outset.

    A lot of forum members will, quite rightly, point out that the most important thing for a first road bike is getting one that fits. I would always recommend going down to a bike shop if you have one close by and getting measured up. They will also be able to give advice on the right bike for you.

    Whatever you do, try not to get too hung up on trying to make the perfect choice with a first bike, you will soon outgrow it and develop a better idea of what you want from a bike with more riding experience. This will quickly lead to bike number 2, then 3,4 etc. :D

    Hi, thanks for the reply.

    I agree with you about getting fitted, i will be heading there this weekend hopefully. i was thinking about future-proofing the bike and spending a little more but if you look at spending a little more everytime i can see this getting expensive, especially with
    This will quickly lead to bike number 2, then 3,4 etc.

    I would like to try and do a ride before you buy but i'm not sure many shops do that. is there anywhere on this forum where you can appeal to people niceness? :D:D
  • ForumNewbie
    ForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    The main difference in these bikes you have listed are that two have triple chainsets. I like these as it gives you lower gears, and I think a smoother transition through the gears, although a lot of cyclists here is the UK look down on triples - I don't really know why. Also two of the bikes have disc brakes, which are relatively new to road bikes but are now becoming more common. I've never used disc brakes, but not sure if they are really necessary for a beginner's bike.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Sora is a perfectly good groupset for a newcomer to road cycling, and it will last for years if you maintain it. My son bought an entry level Felt F95 with Sora 2 years ago, and it's not needed anything doing to it apart from lubing the chain.

    Nothing wrong with triple chainsets either; I chose one when I returned to road cycling at the age of 50 after a 25 year absence, and I'm still riding it 9 years on. 90% of the time I just stay in the middle chainring, but it's nice to know the 30t chainring is there at the end of a long day or if I encounter any unusually steep hills.

    I've only ever ridden rim brakes, and set up properly they are fine. I think I'd only consider disc brakes if I rode somewhere really hilly or was doing stop-start commuting in the wet
  • If its your first bike to test things out then buy the Sora. The new Sora system is absolutely brilliant in my opinion and not a lot different to 105 in looks or performance. Very slick.

    If you then get right into it but want to upgrade later, keep the cheap Sora bike, chuck it on a turbo trainer and buy a slightly better one. Don't waste anything is my motto, trickle everything down.
  • Hey guys,

    Sorry for the late reply. Thanks for all your advice. I think going for entry level is a good idea especially as I may end up on the ground more often then i'm planning on it.

    So Sora is the way forward i think and from the sounds of it the Triples (which are the better groupset), if i'm understanding things, is an easier bike to ride as you need less effort?

    What else would be on the shopping list then? Helmet obviously.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    The absolute minimum is a mini pump, spare inner tubes, tyre levers. You need to be able to deal with a puncture if it happens any distance from home. (unless you'd rather rely on calling a taxi / mate / family member to rescue you?)

    And practice changing a tube at home; you need to know you can do it. Not the kind of thing to be attempting for the first time as the light is failing and rain setting in.

    Saddle pack to carry these in, alternatively stuff them in your jersey pockets.

    And some chain lube and a supply of clean rags.

    After that, the world's your lobster!

    Water bottle(s) and cage(s), helmet (optional), glasses (I use Bolle Contour safety specs; £7 off Ebay. You might want to spend £150 on some Oakleys...) Cycling jerseys, short and long sleeved; rear pockets for carrying stuff.
    Padded lycra shorts. Bibshorts are way more comfy that those with a waistband.
    Cycling mitts. Cycling shoes, clipless pedals and cleats. Toolkit. Track pump. Lights. Garmin.

    If you get hooked you'll end up spending the GDP of a small country...
  • keef66 wrote:
    After that, the world's your lobster!

    Water bottle(s) and cage(s), helmet (optional), glasses (I use Bolle Contour safety specs; £7 off Ebay. You might want to spend £150 on some Oakleys...) Cycling jerseys, short and long sleeved; rear pockets for carrying stuff.
    Padded lycra shorts. Bibshorts are way more comfy that those with a waistband.
    Cycling mitts. Cycling shoes, clipless pedals and cleats. Toolkit. Track pump. Lights. Garmin.

    If you get hooked you'll end up spending the GDP of a small country...

    HOLY CRAP!!!!!
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I do stress that once you get beyond the puncture repair stuff, everything else is optional. As a teenager back in the 70s I rode thousands of miles in ordinary shoes / clothes. The only cycling specific things I had were a saddlebag, water bottle / cage and a puncture kit.
  • keef66 wrote:
    I do stress that once you get beyond the puncture repair stuff, everything else is optional. As a teenager back in the 70s I rode thousands of miles in ordinary shoes / clothes. The only cycling specific things I had were a saddlebag, water bottle / cage and a puncture kit.

    No, I understand what you meant. I can just see this getting expensive. Lol. I would have thought a helmet would have been on the compulsory list?
  • ForumNewbie
    ForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    If you are planning to go clipless, I would recommend MTB SPD pedals and shoes, as the pedals are double-sided and easier to clip into, especially for a beginner, and the shoes are easier to walk in than road shoes. I would recommend these pedals as I have them on my road bikes:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-pd-m540-pedals/
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,766
    Just a minor note of caution, and i have not had time to investigate, but at a quick glace both of the SORA triples are from a few years back, and I thought SORA had taken strides in very recent years, and was now 10 spd.

    It may be that the triple SORA's are an older generation, and that a current 10spd compact SORA is the better buy, don't have any SORA knowledge myself, but hopefully someone who does can elaborate if required.
    If not, please ignore me!
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • If you are planning to go clipless, I would recommend MTB SPD pedals and shoes, as the pedals are double-sided and easier to clip into, especially for a beginner, and the shoes are easier to walk in than road shoes. I would recommend these pedals as I have them on my road bikes:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-pd-m540-pedals/
    I don't like the idea of having to clip into the peddles. Not on my first bike at least. I'll just stick with the bog-standard peddles to begin with.
  • Daniel B wrote:
    Just a minor note of caution, and i have not had time to investigate, but at a quick glace both of the SORA triples are from a few years back, and I thought SORA had taken strides in very recent years, and was now 10 spd.

    It may be that the triple SORA's are an older generation, and that a current 10spd compact SORA is the better buy, don't have any SORA knowledge myself, but hopefully someone who does can elaborate if required.
    If not, please ignore me!

    Hi, thanks for the advice but the triples are tiagras, not soras. Does that change you mr opinion or should I still be careful with the older generation triples?
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    keef66 wrote:
    I do stress that once you get beyond the puncture repair stuff, everything else is optional. As a teenager back in the 70s I rode thousands of miles in ordinary shoes / clothes. The only cycling specific things I had were a saddlebag, water bottle / cage and a puncture kit.

    No, I understand what you meant. I can just see this getting expensive. Lol. I would have thought a helmet would have been on the compulsory list?

    Helmet is a matter for you and you alone. I wear one partly to keep my wife happy, and partly because I think it might make it a bit less painful if I hit the road head first. A helmet doesn't guarantee survival / freedom from injury though.

    There is also the added incentive that if you were knocked off by an insured driver, his / her insurers couldn't argue reduced compensation because you weren't wearing a helmet.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Daniel B wrote:
    Just a minor note of caution, and i have not had time to investigate, but at a quick glace both of the SORA triples are from a few years back, and I thought SORA had taken strides in very recent years, and was now 10 spd.

    It may be that the triple SORA's are an older generation, and that a current 10spd compact SORA is the better buy, don't have any SORA knowledge myself, but hopefully someone who does can elaborate if required.
    If not, please ignore me!

    Hi, thanks for the advice but the triples are tiagras, not soras. Does that change you mr opinion or should I still be careful with the older generation triples?

    I'm running a 105 triple that's coming up for 10 years old, so don't let that put you off...
  • ForumNewbie
    ForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    If you are planning to go clipless, I would recommend MTB SPD pedals and shoes, as the pedals are double-sided and easier to clip into, especially for a beginner, and the shoes are easier to walk in than road shoes. I would recommend these pedals as I have them on my road bikes:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-pd-m540-pedals/
    I don't like the idea of having to clip into the peddles. Not on my first bike at least. I'll just stick with the bog-standard peddles to begin with.
    That's wise. Some people jump in at the deep end and go for one-sided road pedals, which are more tricky to get started with than two-sided MTB pedals. However nothing wrong with starting with normal flat pedals.
  • Ascot17
    Ascot17 Posts: 97
    I would suggest you but a used bike from eBay, rather than new.
    You will get a lot more for your money.
    It is amazing how many people buy a new bike, hardly use it, and sell it a year later!

    Much better to buy a used 105, than a brand new Sora.
  • ForumNewbie
    ForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    Ascot17 wrote:
    I would suggest you but a used bike from eBay, rather than new.
    You will get a lot more for your money.
    It is amazing how many people buy a new bike, hardly use it, and sell it a year later!

    Much better to buy a used 105, than a brand new Sora.
    That's okay for someone who definitely knows the right size for them. If you buy a used there also may be some upgrading you need to do initially. I think the OP would be better buying new, preferably from an LBS, with a view to upgrading components when they wear out.
  • Ascot17 wrote:
    That's okay for someone who definitely knows the right size for them. If you buy a used there also may be some upgrading you need to do initially. I think the OP would be better buying new, preferably from an LBS, with a view to upgrading components when they wear out.

    LBS? ......bike shop?

    I'm the sort of person that like the reassurance of if anything goes wrong I can come back to the shop.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Ascot17 wrote:
    That's okay for someone who definitely knows the right size for them. If you buy a used there also may be some upgrading you need to do initially. I think the OP would be better buying new, preferably from an LBS, with a view to upgrading components when they wear out.

    LBS? ......bike shop?

    I'm the sort of person that like the reassurance of if anything goes wrong I can come back to the shop.

    LBS = Local Bike Shop. Sensible option for a first bike.

    Well worth finding a good one and building a relationship with them.
  • Ascot17
    Ascot17 Posts: 97
    Ascot17 wrote:
    That's okay for someone who definitely knows the right size for them. If you buy a used there also may be some upgrading you need to do initially. I think the OP would be better buying new, preferably from an LBS, with a view to upgrading components when they wear out.

    No. That quote was not me. That is the exact opposite of what I was suggesting!
  • Ascot17 wrote:
    No. That quote was not me. That is the exact opposite of what I was suggesting!

    My bad. Can quite figure out this quoting thing out fully.
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,814
    Re.: Clipless. No need to be frightened of them. You can support yourself in a doorway and practice clipping and unclipping. Or even borrow a turbo trainer and learn how to clip and unclip.
    Then go outside and go to a park or somewhere quiet to practice the same. Clipping in when pointing the bike uphill, I find even to this day (22 years riding clipless) is a PITA (Pain in the aris) so I try to avoid it.
    The only thing is to get help fitting the cleats to your shoe because it's important to get it right for so many reasons, i'm not going to start listing them here. Get comfortable on your bike with standard 'platform' pedals and then consider clipless. You will notice a big difference when you swap over to them.

    Have a look in the Classified section of BR and you could pick up a truck load of half decent clothing, spare parts and accessories for less and probably better quality as your initial choice of clothing will be a stab in the dark with so much to choose from.

    As said before, the more you ride, the more you will know what you want out of a bike and clothing. So don't spend too much in the first place. If you get bitten by the bug, cycling is a continuous and interminable life of upgrading anyway - it's f*cking endless (fun).
    The first thing to buy is a pair of shorts. In winter, you can chuck a pair of tracksuit bottoms over the top of them and wear some layers up top. F*ck looking cool and trendy - just go pedal as much as you can and then decide what the next step is.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!