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New Dura-Ace

teebs_123teebs_123 Posts: 356
edited July 2016 in Road general
Going to be announced today, around mid afternoon...
Orbea Orca OMX DI2 MyO
Kinesis 4s Di2

Posts

  • mamil314mamil314 Posts: 1,103
    'This apparently means a 30ºC reduction in rotor temperature over Shimano’s previous top-end rotors.'


    Time to return unused RT99 Freeza stash?
  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,983
    Twitter - @NapD
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  • About time they went to a 30 cassette
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • me-109me-109 Posts: 1,427
    About time they went to a 30 cassette
    On Dura-Ace???
  • Looks very 105ish to me
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • noodlemannoodleman Posts: 852
    Looks very 105ish to me

    I agree. None of their stuff looks great but at least the previous incarnations of Dura-ace looked superior to the lower level groupsets in the range.
    argon 18 e116 2013 Vision Metron 80
    Bianchi Oltre XR Sram Red E-tap, Fulcrum racing speed xlr
    De Rosa SK pininfarina disc
    S Works Tarmac e-tap 2017
    Rose pro sl disc
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    Looks excellent. A Shimano power meter being the biggest announcement.
  • alex222alex222 Posts: 598
    I liked the look of the previous iteration but for me the asymmetric crank set is unpleasant.
  • philbar72philbar72 Posts: 2,228
    like the look of it. sensible product roadmapping and a concession for the non climbers or climbers that like the zoncolan :)
  • dodgydodgy Posts: 2,890
    This is going to be expensive, I think.
  • vinnymarsdenvinnymarsden Posts: 560
    I agree with the poster who said the game changer is Sram etap..Im a total Shimano man, but if I were building a top range bike I would drop for the e tap..it just seems WAY easier..no cable threading etc… whats not to like!!
    But everyone has a choice…no doubt the new DA will be a big seller, but I do think it looks a lot less top end than previous iterations.
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 7,313
    Must admit if I were going electronic shifting I'd probably go with wireless once it's proven reliable.

    I don't mind the look of the Shimano stuff in a utilitarian way - I actually think they should push that further and drop any pretence of elegance or classic looks and go full brutalist - I suppose that might only have niche appeal though.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • jjshjjsh Posts: 142
    I like the syncro shift, or whatever it is called, as I have never understood why you would have two levers on an electronically controlled groupset~ you are either shifting up or down all things considered. I don't get the big advantage of wireless, it isn't a bit deal running non mechanical cables and I would always think they would be more reliable. So once there is a thru axle standard that is used by most gravel / road bikes, and frames start appearing, this might be my next dream build....

    .... once this all trickles down to Ultegra, of course :-)
  • The advantage I can see for wireless is that it makes fitting it to older frames easier. Converting a frame with externally routed mechanical shifting to DI2 is possible, but messy.

    The other thing I like about Etap is the fact that you have two batteries, and they are swappable mid ride. Carrying a third, charged battery would remove any "range anxiety". I realise Di2 has a battery life measured in months, but I'd always be worrying that I'd be 30 miles from home, on the wrong side of the hills, when the battery went flat.

    Having said that, for a money-no-object bike, I'd go with the new DuraAce.

    I would imagine that at some point in the future, a software update will allow the combination of cadence, speed and crank load information to provide fully automatic shifting.
  • amrushtonamrushton Posts: 1,040
    I tried Etap recently - v.intuitive and certainly takes things on. DA just sets a level but the range of cassettes is good. Of course you could go etap and fit the DA cassettes (assuming compatible hub). I presume Campagnolo are going to be left out in the cold again.
  • mikeneticmikenetic Posts: 486
    At least they've revised the front mech to work with wider tyres - can't wait until that's introduced further down the product range.
  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,138
    amrushton wrote:
    I tried Etap recently - v.intuitive and certainly takes things on. DA just sets a level but the range of cassettes is good. Of course you could go etap and fit the DA cassettes (assuming compatible hub). I presume Campagnolo are going to be left out in the cold again.

    In what way?
  • The cranks look quite similar to the 6800 Ultegra. Trickle up ?

    $3046 looks pretty steep. I wonder how much it costs to replace a damaged rear derailleur if you have an off ?

    The synchronised shifting looks good. I wonder if you can just use one button on the left hood to change up and one other button on the right hood to change down, like a car flappy paddle gearbox thing. Im surprised it took them so long to do this.

    Does the Bluetooth functionality mean you can set up your Di2 using your phone or tablet, rather than plug it into a diagnostics laptop ? Is the inbuilt power meter comparable with Garmin?

    Charging the internal battery by placing a magnet against it sounds good (inductance charging). No USB sockets or removing the battery.

    My thoughts... I cant wait for the cheaper Ultegra version. If only it was wireless like SRAM eTap.
    "The Prince of Wales is now the King of France" - Calton Kirby
  • amrushtonamrushton Posts: 1,040
    amrushton wrote:
    I tried Etap recently - v.intuitive and certainly takes things on. DA just sets a level but the range of cassettes is good. Of course you could go etap and fit the DA cassettes (assuming compatible hub). I presume Campagnolo are going to be left out in the cold again.

    In what way?

    Currently no wireless, do their brakes accommodate wider tyres, any deep drop option?. Is there a standard for their disc brakes. Are their prices a bit too reassuringly expensive, are they offering a built in power option and are the levers adjustable in terms of reach?
  • keith57keith57 Posts: 163
    I realise Di2 has a battery life measured in months, but I'd always be worrying that I'd be 30 miles from home, on the wrong side of the hills, when the battery went flat.

    Except it doesn't work like that. As the battery dies the front shifter drops to the inner ring and then won't shift again. You have plenty of power left in the battery to work the rear mech for a few more days if need be. So it means you can get home, always :D

    It's kind of the last message to charge up the battery for those people who are kind of forgetful! I charge mine about twice a year....
    http://www.fachwen.org
    https://www.strava.com/athletes/303457

    Please note: I’ll no longer engage deeply with anonymous forum users :D
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,337
    Keith57 wrote:
    I realise Di2 has a battery life measured in months, but I'd always be worrying that I'd be 30 miles from home, on the wrong side of the hills, when the battery went flat.

    Except it doesn't work like that. As the battery dies the front shifter drops to the inner ring and then won't shift again. You have plenty of power left in the battery to work the rear mech for a few more days if need be. So it means you can get home, always :D

    It's kind of the last message to charge up the battery for those people who are kind of forgetful! I charge mine about twice a year....

    Exactly - you have 100 rear shifts left when you lose the front. I played "charger chicken" with mine just to find out what would happen. When it did finally give up, I dropped into my LBS and they stuck it on their charger for 15 mins whilst I had a coffee. But, honestly, you'd have to be unbelievably daft to let it run that flat in normal use: London to Edinburgh and I was still in the top quarter of charge.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • keith57keith57 Posts: 163
    Interesting, I didn't know it was a 100 rear shifts after the front stops working.

    When I first installed Di2 the LBS hadn't seen too many, the front mech failed a week or so after the build. Turned out a cable in the front shifter was a bit tight and had worked it way out. A bit of fiddling and all was well for a long time.

    When it happened again many months later, I assumed it was a cable problem. The LBS and I couldn't work out what was wrong for about 30 mins, the rear mech was working fine as before ... Turned out the battery was nearly flat!! There was no mention of this in any documentation I could find at the time...
    http://www.fachwen.org
    https://www.strava.com/athletes/303457

    Please note: I’ll no longer engage deeply with anonymous forum users :D
  • Bo DukeBo Duke Posts: 1,058
    I'm rock'n'roll happy with my 3 year old Dura Ace, see no reason to change. It was the dog's bowlocks when it was made and it still is.
    'Performance analysis and Froome not being clean was a media driven story. I haven’t heard one guy in the peloton say a negative thing about Froome, and I haven’t heard a single person in the peloton suggest Froome isn’t clean.' TSP
  • robbo2011robbo2011 Posts: 1,017
    Keith57 wrote:
    I realise Di2 has a battery life measured in months, but I'd always be worrying that I'd be 30 miles from home, on the wrong side of the hills, when the battery went flat.

    Except it doesn't work like that. As the battery dies the front shifter drops to the inner ring and then won't shift again. You have plenty of power left in the battery to work the rear mech for a few more days if need be. So it means you can get home, always :D

    It's kind of the last message to charge up the battery for those people who are kind of forgetful! I charge mine about twice a year....

    Exactly - you have 100 rear shifts left when you lose the front. I played "charger chicken" with mine just to find out what would happen. When it did finally give up, I dropped into my LBS and they stuck it on their charger for 15 mins whilst I had a coffee. But, honestly, you'd have to be unbelievably daft to let it run that flat in normal use: London to Edinburgh and I was still in the top quarter of charge.


    Except I know someone who has run a battery flat mid ride in a mountain sportive. bike left leaning against other bikes at a stop, shift lever inadvertently left depressed and come back to a flat battery.

    Unbelievably daft? I don't think so.
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