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Shoes for flat pedals?

slamoureuxslamoureux Posts: 3
edited June 2016 in Road beginners
Any reccomondations for some grippy shoes to use on flat pedals? Everything I own is very slippery, and I do not plan on using clipless pedals anytime soon. I was thinking about some mtb shoes like five ten free riders.

Posts

  • sungodsungod Posts: 13,207
    may as well wear trainers if you want flat pedals, if things are slippy it might be better/cheaper to change pedals for some pinned ones, for instance...

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/bbb-bpd-32-moun ... tb-pedals/

    ...many others available, this is just for example
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • sungod wrote:
    may as well wear trainers if you want flat pedals, if things are slippy it might be better/cheaper to change pedals for some pinned ones, for instance...

    <span class="skimlinks-unlinked">http://www.wiggle.co.uk/bbb-bpd-32-mountainhigh-mtb-pedals</span>/

    ...many others available, this is just for example

    I have some shimano flat/spd combo pedals that I would like to keep, instead of putting mtb pedals on my road bike.
  • sungodsungod Posts: 13,207
    in that case try mtb shoes, the grip/stbility on the flats may still be poor though, you'd do better to try spd on them if you already have the pedals, it only takes a few minutes to learn spd clip/unclip

    you can usually set the release tension low if you're worried
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • grenwgrenw Posts: 788
    I use freeriders and flats on my MTB. With decent pedals/pins they very rarely part ways.

    Not sure I'd want them on a road bike though. Pins can take chunks out of you fairly easily. Not sure how well the sticky soles would work without them though.

    If you're going to have to buy new shoes you may as well go spd. It's pretty straightforward and takes no time to get used to them
  • GiraffotoGiraffoto Posts: 2,078
    slamoureux wrote:
    I have some shimano flat/spd combo pedals that I would like to keep, instead of putting mtb pedals on my road bike.

    If this is an aesthetics thing rather than not liking to be clipped in, try SPDs - lots of riders use them on the road. If not, Five Ten Freeriders are where it's at.
    Specialized Roubaix Elite 2015
    XM-057 rigid 29er
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    slamoureux wrote:
    sungod wrote:
    may as well wear trainers if you want flat pedals, if things are slippy it might be better/cheaper to change pedals for some pinned ones, for instance...

    <span class="skimlinks-unlinked">http://www.wiggle.co.uk/bbb-bpd-32-mountainhigh-mtb-pedals</span>/

    ...many others available, this is just for example

    I have some shimano flat/spd combo pedals that I would like to keep, instead of putting mtb pedals on my road bike.
    I'm a bit confused as you said at first you didn't plan using clipless pedals, but the combo you now mention has an SPD side, i.e. clipless.

    I have a pair of Specialized touring MTB SPD shoes - they have a grippy ridged sole like trainers. They are about 6 years old, but if you can find something similar they would be ideal for the flat side of the pedal, but also have SPDs for clipping-in to the SPD side of the pedal if you want to.
  • Paul0975Paul0975 Posts: 14
    Normally I would recommend 5-tens... but this is a road forum.

    I don't like wearing trainers for any real distance, they are just too soft and flexy.

    My Brother has some hiking shoes that he uses that are quite stiff, but not as good as proper bike shoes.
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 1,662
    I used a ride in a set of Lonsdale trainers (Just had a search online and they looked like the lonsdale Camden) which had a hard plastic sole and fitted really well into toe clips.
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