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New bike or not new bike?

its_woody_ukits_woody_uk Posts: 24
edited April 2016 in Road beginners
Hello
Apologies as this kind of question has probably been asked a hundred times before. I used to cycle a reasonable amount but have had a belt size increasing hiatus for the past couple of years and I'm just getting back into it and have signed up to a 60 miler in the near future.

I currently have a 2010 ish Specialized Allez which does a reasonable job. I'm contemplating getting some new wheels through CycleScheme perhaps a Boardman Carbon Road bike or a 2015 Specialized Allez Comp Race with the Roval Rapide CL 40 wheels swapped for some cheaper ones (roughly £1,000).

My question is...would I really notice the difference of one of the above improved bikes? And secondly Boardman or the Specialized?

Any advice would very much be appreciated.
Andrew

Posts

  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    The Allez is a reasonable bike to start with. A carbon bike may soak up a bit more of the road buzz and be a tiny bit lighter (but not neccessarily so) but it's not going to be £1000 better.

    If however you just want a new bike on the tax-dodging Cycle to Work scheme, go ahead. My tight-fisted blue-chip employer still refuses to entertain the idea. Grr!

    Boardman is almost certainly better value for money / more bike per pound than Specialized.
  • AK_jnrAK_jnr Posts: 717
    Personally I wouldnt spend a grand on another Allez.

    If you do want a new bike I would buy the best frame you can find for the money (supersix tiagra as an example) and then upgrade the parts which keep the complete bike price down over time.
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    How's the frame and does it still fit you ok? As spending the money on new wheels (e.g. RS81) and a new groupset (e.g. 5800) as well as a few extra bits and bobs such as shoes, pedals and bar tape, you could well end up with a bike that's better than one of those ones you're looking at buying new.
  • Thanks for the responses. The frame is fine, it's been reasonably well looked after - it wasn't a particularly expensive bike to begin with though. I have no experience of bike mechanics so would probably favour a 'whole' new bike I think.

    As for the employer's refusal...tell them they have a corporate social responsibility to consider their staff's wellbeing!
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,928
    This sounds like a basic "Tyres and wheels" thread. The Boardman is marginally 'better' (whatever that means) than the 2010 Allez but the Allez is still more than good enough for 99% of the riders who cycle. The OP says he has put weight on...well, funnily enough that is the first thing to target to actually improve performance as well as the associated fitness from riding the bike. I would have a look at some nice tyres first (Schwalbe One in 25mm) as they will actually improve many things, particularly if run at the right pressure (as in, not 120 PSI for an 80kg rider) and then, as fitness comes back, some decent standard wheels (like Fulcrum 5LG, etc.). See if you can use your CTW vouchers for kit (some folks are very lenient on what is covered) as some nice shorts and a decent jersey/baselayer/gloves will get you out more, along with maybe a Garmin 200/500, etc., to track your progress.
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    Thanks for the responses. The frame is fine, it's been reasonably well looked after - it wasn't a particularly expensive bike to begin with though. I have no experience of bike mechanics so would probably favour a 'whole' new bike I think.

    That's your choice, of course. But I would say that transferring a groupset is an excellent way to learn about how bicycles are put together. There is a bit to take in at first but once you do you'll be all the richer for it and be able to do your own maintenance on a regular basis, an invaluable skill which you can't get from just buying a bike. It's all pretty straightforward and there are tonnes of guides and youtube videos (I built my turbo bike using almost entirely GCN guides)

    That said you can also get the LBS to do it for you!
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    If you are going to get back into cycling regularly the traditional route of demoting the old bike to winter/wet weather duties and getting a new one for the summer/dry days would seem appropriate - get the Boardman ;)
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • I've taken the sensible advice to relegate my old bike to winter duties.
    I think my decision is now between the Boardman and the Cannondale Supersix 105 from Paul's Cycles...if anybody who knows more than me has opinion on the two it would be appreciated.
  • I've taken the sensible advice to relegate my old bike to winter duties.
    I think my decision is now between the Boardman and the Cannondale Supersix 105 from Paul's Cycles...if anybody who knows more than me has opinion on the two it would be appreciated.

    Between those 2 I'd take the 'dale. But that might just be the snob in me being averse to anything connected with Halfrauds!!

    Joking aside you can't go wrong with either, if price is similar and you're comfy on both then go with whichever looks nicest to you.

    Don't wish to confuse you but have you considered a Giant TCR? Giant are always difficult to beat in terms of bang for buck.
  • If you are going to get a Boardman from Halfords, don't forget to join British Cycling and then you'll get 10% off the bike. I bought a Boardman Team Carbon this way 2 years ago and saved £100. £900 for the bike has proved to be great value and I'd buy another Boardman tomorrow.
  • I hadn't considered Giant really, but I will take a look.
    And, I bought a mountain bike from Halfords a few years back and the experience was less than great...so it's good to hear some positive! The discount is tempting. Thanks!
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