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How do you weigh your bike??

SportivemanSportiveman Posts: 157
edited April 2016 in Road general
Hi
How do you weigh your bike / components I see people quoting weights but want to know how you weigh the bike / components ?
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Posts

  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Small bits you could do on kitchen Scales. Whole bike on luggage type scales or fishing ones. If you were that sad anyway.
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 1,658
    Luggage type scale that the bike hangs from seems to be the one that many prople use.
    Either that or take it along to fat fighters every week in the village hall.
  • 1. Get on the bathroom scales and weigh yourself.
    2. Weigh yourself again, this time holding the bike in the air.
    3. Do some simple mathematics.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,825
    As above, use the bathroom scales.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    Park Tools bike weighing scales........Its the only way to be sure :twisted:

    Digital food scale for the skewers etc. :lol:
  • My carbon fibre bike was build in a clean room on the space station. Their tests showed that both its weight and aerodynamic drag were negligible.
    I'm not a racist! My f'in car is black!
  • banditvicbanditvic Posts: 517
    As above bought the Park tool one, well impressed.
  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    For the tandem, we tend to use:

    medium_images.jpg?hkau2
  • redvisionredvision Posts: 2,670
    Simple luggage scale does the job.

    The weight obsession begins... :D
  • debelidebeli Posts: 582
    You look at it with head inclined, step back, step forward, lift it in both hands (one on head tube, one on seatpost) then sort of raise and lower it in mid-air by about six inches.

    Then you put it down, look at it and do one of those Robert DeNiro quizzical faces and make a "Hmmmm..." noise.

    You don't need to know the actual weight; you just need to look as if you understand these things.
  • step83step83 Posts: 3,997
    Small parts - kitchen scales
    Whole bike - Park tools scale

    Means you can justify buying titanium bolts for everything because you can see the grams saved.
  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,112
    Do you weigh the bike on the Park Tools scales once it's been cleaned in the ultrasonic tank?
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    No, but air pressure has to be favorable.

    Weighing your new skewers on kitchen food scales then has to be confirmed with Park tool bike scales when fitted to bike. 8)

    I am getting Garmin Index™ Smart Scales next :D
  • CiBCiB Posts: 6,098
    I looked on the manufacturer's web site to find out, said 'mmmm' then discarded the info as irrelevant as it was light enough.

    Debeli got it right. :idea:
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,692
    redvision wrote:
    Simple luggage scale does the job.

    Only if you are packing the bike as luggage :wink:
    redvision wrote:
    The weight obsession begins... :D

    Its not Obsessive for me, just interesting.
    Bike tarting is far more of an obsession for me, and even thats just fun.

    Enve stem is the biggest weight saving I have spent per gram.
    Over £100 each at list price! Both of them!! :lol:
  • Kick the tyres? It's how I buy a 2nd hand car and I am sure would equally well for assessing the wirght of your pride and joy.
  • ravey1981ravey1981 Posts: 1,111
    Submerge bike into a large tank of water then collect the displaced water and measure the volume of the water. Since 1 litre of water = 1kg (on earth at least) then you can work out the weight of the bike. Far more accurate than a luggage scale....
  • bernithebikerbernithebiker Posts: 4,148
    ravey1981 wrote:
    Submerge bike into a large tank of water then collect the displaced water and measure the volume of the water. Since 1 litre of water = 1kg (on earth at least) then you can work out the weight of the bike. Far more accurate than a luggage scale....

    That would give you the volume of your bike, not it's weight, and besides your wife is going to be seriously cheesed off to find your pride and joy in the bath......
  • joe2008joe2008 Posts: 1,531
    fisherman scales
  • ravey1981ravey1981 Posts: 1,111
    ravey1981 wrote:
    Submerge bike into a large tank of water then collect the displaced water and measure the volume of the water. Since 1 litre of water = 1kg (on earth at least) then you can work out the weight of the bike. Far more accurate than a luggage scale....

    That would give you the volume of your bike, not it's weight, and besides your wife is going to be seriously cheesed off to find your pride and joy in the bath......

    Same thing, as long as you make sure all cavities are filled with water too.... frame tubes, handlebars etc etc.... Wouldn't be the first time a bike has found its way into the bath believe me....
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,761
    ravey1981 wrote:
    Submerge bike into a large tank of water then collect the displaced water and measure the volume of the water. Since 1 litre of water = 1kg (on earth at least) then you can work out the weight of the bike. Far more accurate than a luggage scale....

    Damn you I was gonna say that :evil:

    Okay my tank would be full of beer and you must drink the displaced ale in pints natch!

    Hmmm bike weight in pints of beer I like it.
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • 1. Get on the bathroom scales and weigh yourself.
    2. Weigh yourself again, this time holding the bike in the air.
    3. Do some simple mathematics.

    Lordy ..... I have a lot of qualifications and this hadn't crossed my mind.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,761
    My Cervelo weighs 11.2 pints awesome
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • bernithebikerbernithebiker Posts: 4,148
    ravey1981 wrote:
    ravey1981 wrote:
    Submerge bike into a large tank of water then collect the displaced water and measure the volume of the water. Since 1 litre of water = 1kg (on earth at least) then you can work out the weight of the bike. Far more accurate than a luggage scale....

    That would give you the volume of your bike, not it's weight, and besides your wife is going to be seriously cheesed off to find your pride and joy in the bath......

    Same thing, as long as you make sure all cavities are filled with water too.... frame tubes, handlebars etc etc.... Wouldn't be the first time a bike has found its way into the bath believe me....

    No - what if your frame were made of lead? It would displace the same amount of water, but it would be much heavier.
  • nbalcombenbalcombe Posts: 87
    Don't forget kids, dust adds grams.
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 1,002
    Personally, I proclaim mythical weight savings, directly proportional to the amount of money I have spent on something.

    For example, my carbon tubs on my CX bike save me almost 2kg.*


    *note, if you add this to all the other bits, most of my bikes are now under -16kg
    Insert bike here:
  • What if your bike is sensitive about it's weight and doesn't want to be weighed? :oops:
  • ravey1981ravey1981 Posts: 1,111
    ravey1981 wrote:
    ravey1981 wrote:
    Submerge bike into a large tank of water then collect the displaced water and measure the volume of the water. Since 1 litre of water = 1kg (on earth at least) then you can work out the weight of the bike. Far more accurate than a luggage scale....

    That would give you the volume of your bike, not it's weight, and besides your wife is going to be seriously cheesed off to find your pride and joy in the bath......

    Same thing, as long as you make sure all cavities are filled with water too.... frame tubes, handlebars etc etc.... Wouldn't be the first time a bike has found its way into the bath believe me....

    No - what if your frame were made of lead? It would displace the same amount of water, but it would be much heavier.

    Yeah ok, you're right. To be fair I was so engrossed in being a clever bugg3r I forgot to be clever.... :oops:
  • Just take the bathroom scales and weigh yourself. do not complicate your life... :D

    life is too short :mrgreen::mrgreen:

    http://cancelesusdeudas.blogspot.mx/
    _____________________________________
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 3,849
    Re the bath. Doesn't chopping the bike up to get it beneath the waterline kind of pose some performance issues?
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