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What's a bikes main selling point?

lawmanlawman Posts: 6,868
edited April 2016 in MTB general
Been wondering recently why folks buy the bikes they do? Is it purely down to perceived value for money and the "best" ki? Brand loyalty? Great reviews? Or is it a more technical approach I.E. geometry, wheelsize etc? I imagine for most it's a combination of many but if you could pick one overriding thing which would would you say was most important for you?

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Posts

  • kickaxekickaxe Posts: 446
    For me it's the bike that feels the most intuitive. I should be able to ride it right away and not have to get used to it much. Obviously I do look at the specs and they go into the choice, but the feel is the most important for me personally.
    -Cube Acid 29" 2013
    -A new Giant Trance 3 2015!
  • oodboooodboo Posts: 2,177
    Looks, colour, then I'd be looking at how it rides, spec can be changed to what I prefer when the original kit wears out.
    I love horses, best of all the animals. I love horses, they're my friends.

    Strava
  • FishFishFishFish Posts: 2,152
    Arguably it is the person who is selling it that is the most important factor.
    ...take your pickelf on your holibobs.... :D

    jeez :roll:
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    For me, the frame comes first. I've ridden a couple bikes which were loaded with top end kit but rode like censored because the frame flexed or suspension wasn't good.
    I always get a demo ride one way or another before buying.
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Value for money. Providing it is the right type of bike for me. I won't pick certain types of full suspension, and the sizing geometry has to fit what I want.
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 23,446 Lives Here
    I bought the Cotic for what I would say are all the wrong reasons if I was advising someone else. I wanted to treat myself after getting a fairly hefty insurance payout having been knocked off. After treating the family to a holiday and buying some other stuff I had money to spoil myself. Fancied a steel frame for no particularly good reason and a 29er seemed better suited to my type of riding. Any half decent bike would be more than adequate for my level so I bought the frame and built it up with what I considered to be good quality components at the right price. I'm happy with it which is the main thing.
    If advising anyone else I'd say the most important thing is that it fits you and feels right. But clearly I'm too stupid to heed my own advice.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    I haven't actually bought a bike for years. I have loads of bits and pieces and kind of assemble them depending on what I want.
    Currently being used:
    A Specialised Enduro, with DH wheels, big tyres and Magura Wotans for gnarly stuff.
    An old Azonic DS1 with more or less period 130mm Marzocchis for somewhat gnarly stuff.
    A middle aged Kona Four for comfy XC type stuff.
    A rather old Kona Explosif with hydraulic rim brakes for arsing around on and girlfriend rides. She has an old rigid Marin.

    I'm always at the back of any group I ride with anyway, so having the latest greatest won't help me much. My only criteria is having a bit of fun on it. If not it gets taken apart and resurrected as something else.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    edited March 2016
    I have never bought a new bike for myself, the only new bike I had was when I was 8.....

    Like CD I build up bikes for what I want
    1/ Litespeed Niota 100mm FS XC lightweight, this I use for most mountain biking, local XC and trail centres, the geo is non standard
    2/ A 1997 Fuji Nevada rigid steel framed mountain bike, all retro parts for summer rides
    3/ A 1997 Gary Fisher Piranha, very tatty that is on slicks and used as a town hack bike, kept looking tatty on purpose, it's also used on a turbo trainer as the high front end gives a reasonable riding position without the need for a wheel chock.
    4/ Carrera Gryphon hybrid frame with mostly MTB parts (26" wheels and slicks) with rack and guards as a commuter.

    All fit their intended purpose just right for me.

    All the bikes in the family are home built, currently that's four more.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    I use an old 1995 Kona Hahanna as a commuter as well. Cheap.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • oodboooodboo Posts: 2,177
    So, everyone saying "I build my own bikes". What led you to the choice of frame? Obviously you can't test ride a frame, did you test ride a bit frame, recommendation, reviews or just liked it and it was available?
    I love horses, best of all the animals. I love horses, they're my friends.

    Strava
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I built mine but know someone who rides for Transition so I borrowed his for a weekend.
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    Selling is just making people believe they need what you offer in otther words marketing,

    buing is more of figuring out what you really need for the things you ride most, and of course skill level. Where I ride, you see a lot of people riding DH bikes, FR bikes and the most recend trend of enduro ones but single tracks with pedalling sections and no lift is not the perfect place for the above and even enduro bikes need a somehow fit rider to hawl them to the top again for a second run. I buy second hand bikes that fit me just to expirement, and then sell on, the only new one I have bought it was a hardtail frame and build from parts I had with the exception of a new fork and wheels. I still ride it and getting the most out of it while now I want to try an aggro 29er.
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    edited March 2016
    Reviews and how it looks, no one wants an ugly bike (unless it's so ugly that it's cool),
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    I bought the Kona Four based on reviews, and liking old Konas - it was originally a xmas present for my son.

    He bought the Enduro, but we'd both ridden and liked them before that.

    The Azonic was originally Ben Pinnick's (Bird). Inherited it when he was clearing his garage. It's just a fun bike - horizontal drop outs, can handle pretty much any fork. Really tough and not too heavy. Short so feels like a big BMX, and the only bike I feel comfortable getting massive air on. (If 6 inches is massive.)

    The Explosif is just a lovely zingy frame, light, stiff but not harsh. It's old, scratched, a bit rusty. I love the look of old Konas.

    Lying around are also a Nicolai - way too much for me, a Diamondback frankenbike (SS with drop bars), Kona Caldera SS and a few in bits - old Marin, Rockhopper, couple more I've lost track of.

    To be honest I'm not young, am a coward, and not a particularly good rider, so I just like to have a bit of fun. If it makes me smile I'll ride it. If it's a bit censored I'll just ride it slower than usual.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    Looks is down the very bottom of the list
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Yep, bottom of my list, as is brand and perceived brand quality. I'd happily ride an luminous green censored if it fit my bill. I used to by a lot of Zaskars, as I was familiar with the geometry and they held their value well.
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    you can always use a little paint remover to get that sorted huh?!
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    Herdwick wrote:
    Looks is down the very bottom of the list

    For you maybe, but looks is a significant factor in most purchases
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I think aesthetics is very low on the list for the majority of serious mountain bikers.
    Everyone I ride with would always put performance at the top of the list with durability, geometry, value and spares availability as the other priorities.
    I really don't understand using aesthetics as a criteria for buying a high performance mountain bike. You can't see it when you're enjoying it, they all look the same when plastered in mud and if you don't care about the looks then you don't care about scratches, dents etc.
    I can guarantee that it's not a criteria considered by Orange's customers!
  • BloggingFitBloggingFit Posts: 919
    Frame for me. A combination of Geometry and suspension design and kinematics followed by material, weight and cost. Past this components aren't such a concern as a rarely buy complete bikes now. If I do then suspension would be the next component for consideration. Generally as long as the overall cost is reasonable with the frame ticking the boxes then functional components are fine as these wear and get replaced.
    Bird Aeris : Trek Remedy 9.9 29er : Trek Procaliber 9.8 SL
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    JGTR wrote:
    For you maybe, but looks is a significant factor in most purchases

    That's why lots of people buy censored , because look good, making something pretty takes half the time and effort than make it work.

    I like to scratch the surface... or so I believe :?
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    When I look like I look on a bike, buying a bike on aesthetics would be a complete waste of time.....that said my SID forks came off a specialized so are a not terribly fetching red colour, I'm sure that helped me get them cheap!
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    So why aren't all bike the same generic colour then?
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Ask the manufacturers...... I'd personally be quite happy if they were all one colour in fact both my main use frames are black.

    Unlike a car you can't choose a make and model AND colour of a bike, you choose a make and model and are told what colour it is (bespoke build brands aside which probably ,make up less than 1% of the market), so the colour's are all for marketing reasons.
  • Components, weight, value, looks, fit.

    Not in any order and I don't intend buying another bike for a very long time, I'm a hobby rider and I'm happy with my bike. It won't be changed untill it falls to bits and it will see upgrades only when needed (with the exception of a dropper post).

    That's my intention but it's easy to get suckered in by new tech or a great deal!
  • UbersonicUbersonic Posts: 11
    How well the bike lends itself to being used single handedly, I.E decent front shocks, the brake/gear levers not being integrated, etc.
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    JGTR wrote:
    So why aren't all bike the same generic colour then?

    Because will put a lot of people off of the sport, it has nothing to do with functionality, in fact if it where the same colour would be cheaper
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    And people like to feel they have a choice even if it's of litle importance
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • ThewaylanderThewaylander Posts: 8,767
    Test ride and what I enjoy riding most!

    Pretty much most components on disposable! so if it has some rubbish bits on that doesn't matter! most important thing is the suspension (as I ride FS) works in the way I like and the bike handles the way I like. the rest is just trimming!
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