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EPS on a plane?

EebijeebiEebijeebi Posts: 91
edited March 2016 in Road general
Hi,
Have taken my bike abroad a couple of times and going again in a couple of weeks. Each time has been in a BB Alan and will be again. After the last trip I was advised by LBS to take the rear mech off as it had been bent over very slightly both times. No other issues.
My bike is due to be fitted with EPS prior to flying and my questions are -
Does anyone know if there are any issues re flying re the internal battery, wires etc., and is taking the rear mech off likely to give me problems? Yes, of course I can ask the shop about the mech when it gets fitted, and I could always delay the whole thing until I get back but would rather not.
Thanks.

Posts

  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,016
    I've travelled with my EPS fitted C59 on a plane in a BBA and never had any issues with security if that's what you mean?

    If you're worried about bending the hanger/mech then take the mech off and make sure it's bubble wrapped up then tape it to something (chain/seat stay) so it can't move. I've got a small frame so the mech stays on the hanger.
  • EebijeebiEebijeebi Posts: 91
    I've travelled with my EPS fitted C59 on a plane in a BBA and never had any issues with security if that's what you mean?

    If you're worried about bending the hanger/mech then take the mech off and make sure it's bubble wrapped up then tape it to something (chain/seat stay) so it can't move. I've got a small frame so the mech stays on the hanger.

    Yes, have visions of having to remove the battery at the check in! Thanks for the reassurance. Does the wire just plug into the mech? Not likely to jigger anything if not ham fisted?
  • sungodsungod Posts: 12,214
    you can check the baggage restrictions for the airline you will be travelling with as they do vary, for instance...

    http://www.virgin-atlantic.com/eu/en/tr ... table.html
    http://www.britishairways.com/cms/globa ... attery.pdf

    ...i think you'll be fine though

    i've got a bba too, large frame so i always take off the rear mech, otherwise i've found the hanger can easily be bent slightly, as above bubble wrap it and strap it down, as long as you don't bend anything an electric rear mech should hold adjustment perfectly

    i'd disconnect the battery just in case a shift is inadvertently activated while packing or in transit
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,180
    I believe the guidance is to take the batteries hand luggage if you can. but if internal then no problem to keep in the bike.
  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,016
    Eebijeebi wrote:
    I've travelled with my EPS fitted C59 on a plane in a BBA and never had any issues with security if that's what you mean?

    If you're worried about bending the hanger/mech then take the mech off and make sure it's bubble wrapped up then tape it to something (chain/seat stay) so it can't move. I've got a small frame so the mech stays on the hanger.

    Yes, have visions of having to remove the battery at the check in! Thanks for the reassurance. Does the wire just plug into the mech? Not likely to jigger anything if not ham fisted?

    Yeah you could unplug the mech if you wanted to but there's two wee clips that hold the sockets together and they can break easily if you're not careful. There's a special tool for the job if you're not nimble of fingers. But there should be enough cable in the chain stay to allow the mech to detach the hanger and then get it taped to the stay.
  • EebijeebiEebijeebi Posts: 91
    Thanks all.
    Links especially helpful and managed to find the Easyjet version which appears identical. Battery type and capacity appear well within the 'permission not required' category.
    Just be careful with the mech then and all should be good.
  • patrickfpatrickf Posts: 536
    fenix wrote:
    I believe the guidance is to take the batteries hand luggage if you can. but if internal then no problem to keep in the bike.
    I believe you are generally not allowed to carry spare batteries in hand luggage - especially lithium variants.

    Some airports require you to verify devices by asking you to power them on with functioning batteries.

    Best keep it in hold - connected or otherwise.
  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,016
    patrickf wrote:
    fenix wrote:
    I believe the guidance is to take the batteries hand luggage if you can. but if internal then no problem to keep in the bike.
    I believe you are generally not allowed to carry spare batteries in hand luggage - especially lithium variants.

    Some airports require you to verify devices by asking you to power them on with functioning batteries.

    Best keep it in hold - connected or otherwise.

    Taking a bike on a plane with an electronic drive train is not an issue. You do NOT have to take the batteries out.
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,844
    patrickf wrote:
    I believe you are generally not allowed to carry spare batteries in hand luggage - especially lithium variants.

    Some airports require you to verify devices by asking you to power them on with functioning batteries.

    Best keep it in hold - connected or otherwise.

    If you don't know, you shouldn't offer advice. The advice you have offered there is incorrect and potentially extremely dangerous. Lithium batteries are classified as dangerous goods and can only be carried according to the International Civil Aviation Organization's Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (Technical Instructions).

    The operator must hold approval for the transport of dangerous goods by air, in the UK this would be an EASA approval. The carrier relies upon the passenger to declare any items that they suspect could be classed as dangerous and if you read the 'small print' or check the website of your carrier you will find advice about what constitutes a dangerous good and what is a prohibited item.

    Spare lithium batteries MUST NOT be placed in hold luggage, if they comply with the limitations on size/ power output they should be carried in your carry on luggage. The reason is fairly obvious. If one bursts into flames (which some have a nasty habit of doing) the crew are trained to deal with it. If it is in the hold there is no access to it and an uncontrolled and uncontained fire can bring an aircraft down in under 20 minutes.

    When travelling it is imperative that you read and understand and then follow the carriers advice regarding dangerous goods. They are classed as such as they can have catastrophic effects on the safety of an aircraft in flight. They are classified into categories, some of which can never be placed on passenger aircraft, those which can must be packed, handled and labelled in accordance with the regulations and the everyday consumer type items must be carried in accordance with the limitations. Please do not give incorrect advice if you don't know, this is an extremely serious subject that the general public are largely ignorant of.

    PP

    (for those who wish to know my qualification to comment so robustly - I am an airline training captain who undergoes dangerous goods training annually)
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    Personally, I take the battery out of my bike. We've got a bit hooked up on spare Lithium batteries - it isn't a spare battery. BUT I like to disconnect my Di2 when boxed up because else it might be operating under movement in the box. A disconnected battery is a "spare" battery to all intents and purposes. As PP says, Li batteries have a poor track record for fires - I've visited the labs where they do the standards tests - they could as well be testing small bombs (there's lots of concentrated energy in batteries).
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,016
    Just to clarify to the OP - again - taking a bike with an electronic drive train on a plane is absolutely fine. You don't have to take the battery out and leaving it connected is entirely up to you.

    The Di2 and EPS battery (and no doubt eTap) is sub 100wh which puts it in the mobile/camera/laptop category and requires no airline approval. In fact I think Di2 and EPS are less than 5wh (Edit - just checked Di2 and it's 3.7wh!).
  • bernithebikerbernithebiker Posts: 4,148
    I would imagine pretty much every suitcase contains a lithium battery of some kind, be it a camera, phone, laptop, drone, vibrator, etc. the list goes on....
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,180
    I always take my lithium battery things in the cabin - mainly as they're things I don't want to lose in transit somewhere.
    Who puts their phone in a suitcase ?
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,844
    I would imagine pretty much every suitcase contains a lithium battery of some kind, be it a camera, phone, laptop, drone, vibrator, etc. the list goes on....

    Yes and that is fine. If you read what I put the regulations don't allow for spare batteries to be carried in hold luggage. The reason being that an item with a battery correctly attached is less likely to short than a loose battery with its terminals uncovered...

    If Bernie likes to carry his valuables in his hold luggage then he is braver than me. Even with a lock on your case (which are hopeless) you will find that in certain cultures stealing from suitcases is seen as part of the 'perks' attached to the baggage handling role...and I don't just mean third world countries, Miami had an organised crime syndicate nicking from passenger bags!

    As thegreatdivide has correctly stated, EPS or Di2 is not an issue on your bike in the hold. However, you may come across some check-in staff or outsize baggage staff * who have no idea and when they see wires and batteries will think they have just entered security nirvana and will start questioning and 'telling' you where you are wrong... :roll:

    PP

    * that's the bags that are outsized, not necessarily the staff... :wink:
  • moscowflyermoscowflyer Posts: 531
    Sounds like a good idea for a film. Samuel L Jackson battles leaking battery acid from a whole host of Campag equipped bikes in the hold.
  • protoproto Posts: 1,470
    Not sure what the guidelines are for Di2 and Campag EPS V2 & V3, but on my V1 EPS I always switch the power off with the magnet, just in case something rests against shift lever whilst in transit, draining the battery.
  • patrickfpatrickf Posts: 536
    Pilot Pete wrote:
    patrickf wrote:
    I believe you are generally not allowed to carry spare batteries in hand luggage - especially lithium variants.

    Some airports require you to verify devices by asking you to power them on with functioning batteries.

    Best keep it in hold - connected or otherwise.

    If you don't know, you shouldn't offer advice. The advice you have offered there is incorrect and potentially extremely dangerous. Lithium batteries are classified as dangerous goods and can only be carried according to the International Civil Aviation Organization's Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (Technical Instructions).

    The operator must hold approval for the transport of dangerous goods by air, in the UK this would be an EASA approval. The carrier relies upon the passenger to declare any items that they suspect could be classed as dangerous and if you read the 'small print' or check the website of your carrier you will find advice about what constitutes a dangerous good and what is a prohibited item.

    Spare lithium batteries MUST NOT be placed in hold luggage, if they comply with the limitations on size/ power output they should be carried in your carry on luggage. The reason is fairly obvious. If one bursts into flames (which some have a nasty habit of doing) the crew are trained to deal with it. If it is in the hold there is no access to it and an uncontrolled and uncontained fire can bring an aircraft down in under 20 minutes.

    When travelling it is imperative that you read and understand and then follow the carriers advice regarding dangerous goods. They are classed as such as they can have catastrophic effects on the safety of an aircraft in flight. They are classified into categories, some of which can never be placed on passenger aircraft, those which can must be packed, handled and labelled in accordance with the regulations and the everyday consumer type items must be carried in accordance with the limitations. Please do not give incorrect advice if you don't know, this is an extremely serious subject that the general public are largely ignorant of.

    PP

    (for those who wish to know my qualification to comment so robustly - I am an airline training captain who undergoes dangerous goods training annually)
    I stand corrected. Thanks for the correction.
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