light or heavy grease for wheel bearings

dennisn
dennisn Posts: 10,601
edited March 2016 in Workshop
Since the rear wheel has more weight on it should I be looking into a heavier grease because of the higher loads back there? Possibly up front using a much lighter, smoother, more yielding, softer to the touch lube to help increase my speed?

Comments

  • mamba80
    mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    dennisn wrote:
    Since the rear wheel has more weight on it should I be looking into a heavier grease because of the higher loads back there? Possibly up front using a much lighter, smoother, more yielding, softer to the touch lube to help increase my speed?

    Depends on how much climbing you do and if you are standing or seated, standing climbing (honking) places more weight on the front wheel, using a lighter grease in these circumstances might result in greater bearing wear, voiding any warranty on the wheels if applicable?
    i always carry different weight greases with me when riding in the mountains.
  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382
    I always have a range of greases with me and a thermometer. As the days warms up I change the grease to suit the temperature. I save the grease I remove so I can put it back when the temperature drops.
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    mamba80 wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    Since the rear wheel has more weight on it should I be looking into a heavier grease because of the higher loads back there? Possibly up front using a much lighter, smoother, more yielding, softer to the touch lube to help increase my speed?


    i always carry different weight greases with me when riding in the mountains.
    Couldn't you just carry spare bearings already greased and ready to insert?
  • mamba80
    mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    dennisn wrote:
    mamba80 wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    Since the rear wheel has more weight on it should I be looking into a heavier grease because of the higher loads back there? Possibly up front using a much lighter, smoother, more yielding, softer to the touch lube to help increase my speed?


    i always carry different weight greases with me when riding in the mountains.

    Couldn't you just carry spare bearings already greased and ready to insert?

    When i commute thats exactly what i do, however, training and racing in the Mountains...? weight penalty of those bearings means lost watts, i dont ride for 2nd place.
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    Yepp, I ensure peak climbing performance in wet weather by carrying my mudguards over my shoulder on the way up and then only putting them back on prior to descending. I also make sure I empty my water bottles by drinking all the water at the foot of a climb. Seems to work well.
  • Alex99
    Alex99 Posts: 1,407
    mamba80 wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    mamba80 wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    Since the rear wheel has more weight on it should I be looking into a heavier grease because of the higher loads back there? Possibly up front using a much lighter, smoother, more yielding, softer to the touch lube to help increase my speed?


    i always carry different weight greases with me when riding in the mountains.

    Couldn't you just carry spare bearings already greased and ready to insert?

    When i commute thats exactly what i do, however, training and racing in the Mountains...? weight penalty of those bearings means lost watts, i dont ride for 2nd place.

    Don't much around changing your bearings, just carry spare wheels. That way, you can have light wheels for the climb, and special heavy ones for the descent.
  • homers_double
    homers_double Posts: 8,156
    I don't grease mine so don't have an issue.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • me-109
    me-109 Posts: 1,915
    Save weight - take the bearings (and grease) out completely.
  • fudgey
    fudgey Posts: 854
    dennisn wrote:
    Since the rear wheel has more weight on it should I be looking into a heavier grease because of the higher loads back there? Possibly up front using a much lighter, smoother, more yielding, softer to the touch lube to help increase my speed?

    You tear into me for tweaking a few spokes and then come out with the above...

    Cant tell if serious!
    My winter bike is exactly the same as my summer bike,,, but dirty...
  • homers_double
    homers_double Posts: 8,156
    Fudgey wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    Since the rear wheel has more weight on it should I be looking into a heavier grease because of the higher loads back there? Possibly up front using a much lighter, smoother, more yielding, softer to the touch lube to help increase my speed?

    You tear into me for tweaking a few spokes and then come out with the above...

    Cant tell if troll!

    FTFY
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    If bearings are ceramic, then use oil not grease. And if using unobtainium steel bearings you need neither oil nor grease.
    WyndyMilla Massive Attack | Rourke 953 | Condor Italia 531 Pro | Boardman CX Pro | DT Swiss RR440 Tubeless Wheels
    Find me on Strava
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    You hardly need any grease to go uphill, given the speed, but you need grease to go downhill, so heavy grease is best, as it'll get you down quicker... it's gravity, innit... :-)
    left the forum March 2023
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,859
    plus the heavier grease holds speed better, just like heavy rims
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    sungod wrote:
    plus the heavier grease holds speed better, just like heavy rims

    Another argument for Heavy Metal, if there was any need for it...
    left the forum March 2023