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Anyone tried 650b wheels on CX bike?

alesupperalesupper Posts: 286
edited March 2016 in Cyclocross
I went up Kentmere on my CX bike yesterday and found myself thinking "I wish I had bigger tyres". Has anyone tried 650b wheels in a CX frame with larger volume tyres?

Posts

  • 650b to the best of my knowledge has few if any cx tyres, that is off road tyres.

    There are a few slick, or lightly threaded tyres for road and maybe a bit of gravel, but not CX tyres it's self.
  • 97th choice97th choice Posts: 2,305
    alesupper wrote:
    I went up Kentmere on my CX bike yesterday and found myself thinking "I wish I had bigger tyres". Has anyone tried 650b wheels in a CX frame with larger volume tyres?

    I very much doubt it.

    You should start convincing yourself that you need a mountain bike.
    Too-ra-loo-ra, too-ra-loo-rye, aye

    Giant Trance
    Radon ZR 27.5 Race
    Btwin Alur700
    Merida CX500
  • Yes I think the lack of tyre choice is going to end this project. I was hoping you could get may be a 1.7-1.8" tyre but you can't. Never mind!
  • alesupper wrote:
    Yes I think the lack of tyre choice is going to end this project. I was hoping you could get may be a 1.7-1.8" tyre but you can't. Never mind!

    some of the gravel bikes have impressive clearances for 40+mm tyres or a monster cross?

    I personally like the simplicity of cross bikes, remind me of some of the first MTBs.
  • 650b to the best of my knowledge has few if any cx tyres, that is off road tyres.

    There are a few slick, or lightly threaded tyres for road and maybe a bit of gravel, but not CX tyres it's self.

    But there are loads of MTB tyres, which are too big for UCI rules, but not for your local cake fuelled race.

    I thought of building myself a 650 b wheelset, but I had problems fitting a 2 + inch tyre in the rear triangle and smaller tyres would give very little ground clearance for the BB
  • I'm going to measure the clearance on my CX bike to see if they will take these tyres which would certainly help when I'm riding in MTB territory.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/wtb- ... prod121980
  • alesupper wrote:
    I'm going to measure the clearance on my CX bike to see if they will take these tyres which would certainly help when I'm riding in MTB territory.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/wtb- ... prod121980

    I can fit 40 mm no problem on my CX bike. Pretty sure you'll have no problem at the front, the rear might be more of a hit and a miss
  • Any recommendations for 700x40c off road tyres other than the one linked above?
  • alesupper wrote:
    Any recommendations for 700x40c off road tyres other than the one linked above?

    No idea, the only 40 I have are studded tyres for ice... probably not much choice as 700c... you might want to look at those marketed as 29er... 40 mm is roughly 1.6 inches
  • trek_dantrek_dan Posts: 1,366
    Like most Continental tyres their 35C CX offerings measure up big when actually fitted. Wasn't enough clearance on the rear of my CX bike to actually make fitting them practical.
  • MoonbikerMoonbiker Posts: 1,706
    How about fit a rigid a mtb fork then at least you can have a big front tyre which is more important for small drop off etc I reckon?
  • it's much longer though, it will lift the front of the bike by a couple of inches at least
  • MoonbikerMoonbiker Posts: 1,706
    My cx bike (ridley xbow) fork has pretty tight clearance with 32c tyres & thus annoying clogs up fast in muddy races, 35c or 40c tyes wouldn't fit.

    Looking at all the other bikes though after the race i noticed some of the other cx bikes forks have alot better clearances & they didn't clog as fast in the same conditions.

    Some cx forks here say the can takes 48c tyres:

    http://whiskyparts.co/catalog/forks
  • My Boardman Team CX will take 650b with a 2 inch commuter tyre - only as an experiment, haven't actually ridden it
  • Moonbiker wrote:
    My cx bike (ridley xbow) fork has pretty tight clearance with 32c tyres & thus annoying clogs up fast in muddy races, 35c or 40c tyes wouldn't fit.

    Looking at all the other bikes though after the race i noticed some of the other cx bikes forks have alot better clearances & they didn't clog as fast in the same conditions.

    Some cx forks here say the can takes 48c tyres:

    http://whiskyparts.co/catalog/forks

    The cost of a Whisky fork is that of a new bike, give or take
  • 650b to the best of my knowledge has few if any cx tyres, that is off road tyres.

    There are a few slick, or lightly threaded tyres for road and maybe a bit of gravel, but not CX tyres it's self.

    But there are loads of MTB tyres, which are too big for UCI rules, but not for your local cake fuelled race.

    I thought of building myself a 650 b wheelset, but I had problems fitting a 2 + inch tyre in the rear triangle and smaller tyres would give very little ground clearance for the BB

    Most MTB tyres be they 26/27.5/29 are 2.2-2.4 claimed though sizes varies in actual measured.

    2 inch and below you have a few mud spike tyres such as dirty dan and MudX and a few slick/commuter type tyres, remarkably few tyres at that sizes ie 2inch and below.

    Get a bit more choice if the frame can take 2.1inch and start to get your racing Ralph's and what not. Though more robust tyres are probably too fat starting at 2.25 and climbing.
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,362
    alesupper wrote:
    Any recommendations for 700x40c off road tyres other than the one linked above?

    This may be a little late but Planet X were doing the WTB Tubeless (TCS) 700x40 Nano's for £35 a pair using their 40% off Stock Clearance code. I've just bought some as my "Monster Cross" singlespeed came with the wired bead version as standard and I liked them off road. Not too buzzy on tarmac either.
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
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